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Chemistry: 1,001 Practice Problems For Dummies by Richard H. Langley, Heather Hattori

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Chapter 16

Answers and Explanations

Here are the answer explanations for all 1,001 chemistry questions in this book. For reference, you can find the periodic table in the Appendix.

1.    a gram

A gram (g) is a common metric unit of mass used in the laboratory.

2.    a centimeter

A centimeter (cm) is a common metric unit of length used to measure small objects in the laboratory. You can also measure small objects in millimeters (mm).

3.    a milliliter

A milliliter (mL) is a common metric unit of volume used in the laboratory. You can also measure volume in cubic centimeters (cm3 or cc), but that unit is less common in the lab.

4.    a millimeter of mercury

A millimeter of mercury (mm Hg), also known as a torr, is a common metric unit of pressure used in the laboratory when dealing with gases. Other units of pressure are pascals, atmospheres, and bars; however, they aren’t as common in the chemistry lab.

5.    a joule

The joule (J) is a basic unit of energy or work in the metric system. It’s equal to a ­newton-meter (N·m).

6.    kilo-

Kilo- is the metric prefix that represents 1,000, or 103.

7.    milli-

Milli- is the metric prefix that represents 9781118549322-eq160001.eps, or 10–3.

8.    centi-

Centi- is the metric prefix that represents 9781118549322-eq160002.eps, or 10–2.

9.    nano-

Nano- is the metric prefix that represents ...

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