You are previewing Challenges for Game Designers.

Challenges for Game Designers

Cover of Challenges for Game Designers by Ian Schreiber... Published by Course Technology PTR
  1. Copyright
  2. Acknowledgments
  3. About the Authors
  4. Introduction and Welcome
    1. Professional Game Designers
    2. Not a Game Designer... Yet!
    3. Game Design Instructors
    4. Continuing the Conversation
    5. Random Trivia: How This Book Happened
  5. I. Building Blocks
    1. 1. The Basics
      1. What Is Game Design?
      2. What Game Design Is Not
      3. Types of Design
      4. What Is a Game?
      5. The Core of a Game
      6. Where Do Ideas Come From?
      7. Learning Game Design
      8. Common Terms in Game Design
      9. Approaches to Game Design
      10. Iterative Design
      11. Constraints on Game Design
      12. Overcoming Designer’s Block
      13. Resources
    2. 2. Game Design Atoms
      1. The Game State and Game Views
      2. Players, Avatars, and Game Bits
      3. Mechanics
      4. Dynamics
      5. Goals
      6. Theme
      7. What Comes First?
      8. Putting It All Together
      9. Challenges
      10. Resources
    3. 3. Puzzle Design
      1. Basic Puzzle Characteristics
      2. What Makes Puzzles Fun?
      3. Puzzle Types
      4. Level Design and Puzzle Design
      5. All for One and One for All
      6. Challenges
      7. Non-Digital Shorts
      8. Resources
    4. 4. Converting Digital to Physical
      1. Practical Application
      2. How to Start
      3. Challenges
      4. Non-Digital Shorts
  6. II. Chance and Skill
    1. 5. Elements of Chance
      1. The Role (Roll?) of Chance in Games
      2. Mechanics of Chance
      3. All Randomness Is Not Created Equal
      4. Completely Random Games
      5. Challenges
      6. Non-Digital Shorts
      7. Resources
    2. 6. Elements of “Strategic” Skill
      1. The Role of Skill in Games
      2. Types of Decisions
      3. Frequency or Anticipation of Decisions
      4. Strategy and Tactics
      5. Completely Skill-Based Games
      6. Mechanics of Skill
      7. Strategic Evaluation
      8. Challenges
      9. Non-Digital Shorts
      10. Resources
    3. 7. Elements of “Twitch” Skill
      1. Challenging the Player
      2. Tuning
      3. Twitch Decision Making
      4. Twitch Mechanics
      5. Challenges
      6. Non-Digital Shorts
      7. References
    4. 8. Chance and Skill: Finding the Balance
      1. Consider the Target Audience
      2. Playtesting for Luck/Skill Balance
      3. Exchanging Luck and Skill
      4. Combining Luck and Skill
      5. Challenges
      6. Non-Digital Shorts
  7. III. Writing Game Concepts
    1. 9. What Is Intellectual Property?
      1. Types of IP
      2. Why IP?
      3. Working with an IP
      4. Challenges
      5. Non-Digital Shorts
    2. 10. Creating Sequels
      1. Why Sequels?
      2. Types of Sequels
      3. Working on Sequels
      4. Honoring the Player
      5. Research
      6. Challenges
      7. Non-Digital Shorts
    3. 11. Targeting a Market
      1. Why Do I Care? Isn’t This for Marketing People?
      2. Learning About Your Target Market
      3. Abilities of the Target Market
      4. Focus Groups
      5. The Mass Market
      6. Challenges
      7. Non-Digital Shorts
    4. 12. Learning an Unfamiliar Genre
      1. Why Start with Genre?
      2. How to Start
      3. Challenges
      4. Non-Digital Shorts
    5. 13. Designing a Game to Tell a Story
      1. Writer, Designer, or Both?
      2. Story Arcs
      3. Narratology and Ludology
      4. Types of Stories in Games
      5. Storytelling Methods
      6. Tell, Show, Do
      7. Setting and Character
      8. Working Backward
      9. Choosing Mechanics to Match the Story
      10. Challenges
      11. Non-Digital Shorts
      12. References
  8. IV. Additive and Subtractive Design
    1. 14. Adding and Subtracting Mechanics
      1. Why Add Mechanics?
      2. Why Cut Mechanics?
      3. After the Tinkering
      4. Challenges
      5. Non-Digital Shorts
    2. 15. “But Make It Multiplayer”
      1. Looking Forward
      2. Types of Multiplayer Games
      3. Issues in Multiplayer Game Design
      4. Challenges
      5. Non-Digital Shorts
  9. V. Special Topics
    1. 16. Creating a User Interface
      1. Goals of the UI
      2. Affordances: Right = Easy, Wrong = Hard
      3. A Note About Accessibility
      4. Feedback
      5. The Process of UI Design
      6. Intentionally “Bad” UI
      7. Challenges
      8. Recommended Reading
    2. 17. Games as Art
      1. Beyond the Visual
      2. Beyond Fun
      3. Passage: A Game That Almost Made Me Cry Patrick Dugan, Game Designer
      4. Columbine, Videogames as Expression, and Ineffability Ian Bogost, Persuasive Games
      5. On Authorship in Games Clint Hocking, Design Director, Ubisoft
      6. Challenges
      7. Non-Digital Shorts
      8. Resources
    3. 18. Games as a Teaching Tool
      1. What About Those Crazy Stories I Hear?
      2. Using Games as a Catalyst for Learning
      3. Designing and Modifying Games for Students
      4. Challenges
      5. Non-Digital Shorts
      6. References
    4. 19. Serious Games
      1. Types of Serious Games
      2. The Purpose Is the Core
      3. The Focus Test
      4. Why Serious Games?
      5. Challenges
      6. Non-Digital Shorts
    5. 20. Casual Games
      1. Why Casual?
      2. Challenges
      3. Non-Digital Shorts
    6. 21. Social Networks and Games
      1. Categorizing Social-Network Games
      2. What Works Best?
      3. Social-Network Propagation Mechanics
      4. Slowing the Spread
      5. High Score and the Social Network
      6. The Future of Social Networks and Games
      7. Challenges
      8. Non-Digital Shorts
      9. Resources
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Chapter 20. Casual Games

Fifteen minutes here. Ten minutes there. All over the world, people are playing casual games. From Solitaire to Diner Dash to Bejeweled to Zuma, casual games are a booming market, and generally speaking, they are amazingly popular with people who ignore other games entirely: the 30+ female crowd. It’s a lucrative and growing market, too.

What is a casual game? It’s not an easy question to answer. The IGDA’s Casual Games SIG defines casual games as “games that generally involve less complicated game controls and overall complexity in terms of gameplay or investment required to get through the game”.[1] The Casual Game Association defines casual games as those “developed for the general public and families” and that are “fun ...

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