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Case Studies in Novel Food Processing Technologies

Book Description

Novel food processing technologies have significant potential to improve product quality and process efficiency. Commercialisation of new products and processes brings exciting opportunities and interesting challenges. Case studies in novel food processing technologies provides insightful, first-hand experiences of many pioneering experts involved in the development and commercialisation of foods produced by novel processing technologies.

Part one presents case studies of commercial products preserved with the leading nonthermal technologies of high pressure processing and pulsed electric field processing. Part two broadens the case histories to include alternative novel techniques, such as dense phase carbon dioxide, ozone, ultrasonics, cool plasma, and infrared technologies, which are applied in food preservation sectors ranging from fresh produce, to juices, to disinfestation. Part three covers novel food preservation techniques using natural antimicrobials, novel food packaging technologies, and oxygen depleted storage techniques. Part four contains case studies of innovations in retort technology, microwave heating, and predictive modelling that compare thermal versus non-thermal processes, and evaluate an accelerated 3-year challenge test.

With its team of distinguished editors and international contributors, Case studies in novel food processing technologies is an essential reference for professionals in industry, academia, and government involved in all aspects of research, development and commercialisation of novel food processing technologies.

  • Provides insightful, first-hand experiences of many pioneering experts involved in the development and commercialisation of foods produced by novel processing technologies
  • Presents case studies of commercial products preserved with the leading nonthermal technologies of high pressure processing and pulsed electric field processing
  • Features alternative novel techniques, such as dense phase carbon dioxide, ozone, ultrasonics, cool plasma, and infrared technologies utilised in food preservation sectors

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. Contributor contact details
  6. Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
  7. Preface
  8. Chapter 1: Non-thermal food pasteurization processes: an introduction
    1. Abstract:
    2. 1.1 Introduction
    3. 1.2 Pulsed electric field
    4. 1.3 High hydrostatic pressure
    5. 1.4 Ionizing irradiation
    6. 1.5 Ultraviolet radiation
    7. 1.6 Non-thermal plasma
    8. 1.7 Concentrated high intensity electric field
    9. 1.8 Conclusions
  9. Part I: Case studies in high pressure and pulsed electric field processing of food
    1. Chapter 2: Commercial high pressure processing of ham and other sliced meat products at Esteban Espuña, S.A.
      1. Abstract:
      2. 2.1 Introduction
      3. 2.2 High pressure processing (HPP) equipment
      4. 2.3 Commercialized HPP-treated food products
      5. 2.4 Treatment costs
      6. 2.5 Conclusions
      7. 2.6 Company information
    2. Chapter 3: High hydrostatic pressure processing of fruit juices and smoothies: research and commercial application
      1. Abstract:
      2. 3.1 Introduction
      3. 3.2 Fruit composition, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment and recommended fruit intake
      4. 3.3 Basic research on high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing of fruit juices and derivatives
      5. 3.4 Commercialization of juices treated by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP)
      6. 3.5 Future trends
      7. 3.6 Sources of further information and advice
      8. 3.7 Acknowledgements
    3. Chapter 4: Pulsed electric field (PEF) systems for commercial food and juice processing
      1. Abstract:
      2. 4.1 Introduction
      3. 4.2 Key process parameters
      4. 4.3 Pulsed electric field (PEF) system overview
      5. 4.4 Pulsed electric field (PEF) system trade-offs and optimization
      6. 4.5 Pulsed electric field (PEF) processing and commercialization status
      7. 4.6 Conclusions
    4. Chapter 5: The environmental impact of pulsed electric field treatment and high pressure processing: the example of carrot juice
      1. Abstract:
      2. 5.1 Introduction
      3. 5.2 Goal definition and scoping
      4. 5.23 Data sources and quality of data
      5. 5.3 Inventory of carrot juice processing
      6. 5.4 Choice of impact categories and impact assessment methods
      7. 5.5 Results
      8. 5.6 Discussion and conclusions
      9. 5.7 Acknowledgements
  10. Part II: Case studies in other novel food processing techniques
    1. Chapter 6: Industrial applications of high power ultrasonics in the food, beverage and wine industry
      1. Abstract:
      2. 6.1 Introduction
      3. 6.2 High power ultrasound
      4. 6.3 Process and scale-up parameters
      5. 6.4 Applications and benefits
      6. 6.5 Large-scale implementation
      7. 6.6 Roadmap to successful commercialization
      8. 6.7 Conclusion
    2. Chapter 7: The potential of novel infrared food processing technologies: case studies of those developed at the USDA-ARS Western Region Research Center and the University of California-Davis
      1. Abstract:
      2. 7.1 Introduction
      3. 7.2 Effect of infrared (IR) on food molecular constituents
      4. 7.3 Case studies in novel infrared (IR) technologies for improved processing efficiency and food safety
      5. 7.4 Simultaneous infrared blanching and dehydration (SIRBD)
      6. 7.5 Sequential infrared (IR) and freeze-drying of strawberry slices
      7. 7.6 Infrared (IR) pasteurization of raw almonds
      8. 7.7 Infrared (IR) dry-roasting of almonds
      9. 7.8 An overview of infrared (IR) rough rice drying and disinfestation
      10. 7.9 Effectiveness of infrared (IR) heating for simultaneous drying and disinfestation of freshly harvested rough rice
      11. 7.10 Effectiveness of infrared (IR) heating for disinfestation of stored rough rice
      12. 7.11 Infrared (IR) radiation heating for tomato peeling
      13. 7.12 Future trends
      14. 7.13 Acknowledgements
    3. Chapter 8: Validation and commercialization of dense phase carbon dioxide processing for orange juice
      1. Abstract:
      2. 8.1 Introduction
      3. 8.2 Dense phase carbon dioxide processing
      4. 8.3 Better Than Fresh™ (BTF) system
      5. 8.4 Commercialization of the Better Than Fresh™ (BTF) system
      6. 8.5 Conclusion
    4. Chapter 9: Progress and issues with the commercialization of cool plasma in food processing: a selection of case studies
      1. Abstract:
      2. 9.1 Introduction
      3. 9.2 Case studies
      4. 9.3 Case study 1: cascaded dielectric barrier discharge (CDBD) – cool plasma for the decontamination of packaging materials
      5. 9.4 Case study 2: atmospheric gliding arc and blown arc air cold plasma system
      6. 9.5 Case study 3: atmospheric-based dielectric gas discharge
      7. 9.6 Case study 4: ultralight dielectric barrier discharge and spot system
      8. 9.7 Case study 5: microwave vacuum cool plasma generation
      9. 9.8 Case study 6: cool plasma for application in food processing and medical device technology
      10. 9.9 Case study 7: gentle e-ventus® disinfection of cereal crop seeds, grain and food
      11. 9.10 Conclusions and future trends
      12. 9.12 Appendix
    5. Chapter 10: Commercial applications of ozone in food processing
      1. Abstract:
      2. 10.1 Introduction
      3. 10.3 Ozone for shellfish and fish processing
      4. 10.4 Ozone in breweries and wineries
      5. 10.5 Ozone for vegetable processing and storage
      6. 10.6 Ozone washing/packaging of fresh cut salad mixes and fruit
      7. 10.7 Ozone processing of meats and sushi
      8. 10.8 Ozone for preparation of fresh (not frozen) microwaveable meals
      9. 10.9 Cleaning-in-place with ozone
      10. 10.10 Future prospects for ozone in agri-foods and food processing
    6. Chapter 11: Novel technologies for the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed fruits and vegetables
      1. Abstract:
      2. 11.1 Introduction
      3. 11.2 Optimization of existing chemical treatments
      4. 11.3 Antimicrobial treatments
      5. 11.4 Adaptation of existing technologies: plasma, phage treatment and bacteria-based biological controls
      6. 11.5 Future trends
      7. 11.6 Sources of further information and advice
      8. 11.7 Acknowledgements
  11. Part III: Case studies in food preservation using antimicrobials, novel packaging and storage techniques
    1. Chapter 12: Use of natamycin as a preservative on the surface of baked goods: a case study
      1. Abstract:
      2. 12.1 Introduction
      3. 12.2 Natamycin
      4. 12.3 The problem of mold spoilage in baked goods
      5. 12.4 Trials on the use of natamycin as a surface treatment of baked goods
      6. 12.5 Considerations and selection of the spraying system
      7. 12.6 Future trends
    2. Chapter 13: Commercial applications of oxygen depleted atmospheres for the preservation of food commodities
      1. Abstract:
      2. 13.1 Introduction
      3. 13.2 Definitions and uses of oxygen depleted atmospheres
      4. 13.3 Effects of MAs on stored-product insects and mites
      5. 13.4 The effect of modified atmosphere (MA) on preventing mold growth and mycotoxin formation
      6. 13.5 Effects of modified atmosphere (MA) on product quality
      7. 13.6 Generation and application of modified atmospheres (MAs)
      8. 13.7 Types of structures used for modified atmospheres (MAs)
      9. 13.8 Specific applications of modified atmosphere (MA)
      10. 13.9 Sources of further information and advice
    3. Chapter 14: Commercialization of time-temperature integrators for foods
      1. Abstract:
      2. 14.1 Introduction: active and intelligent packaging – time-temperature integrators (TTIs)
      3. 14.2 History of time-temperature integrators (TTIs) – definition and principles of operation
      4. 14.3 State of the art time-temperature integrator (TTI) technologies
      5. 14.4 Use of time-temperature integrators (TTIs) as tools for food chain monitoring and management
      6. 14.5 Use of time-temperature integrators (TTIs) as shelf-life indicators for consumers
      7. 14.6 Factors in time-temperature integrator (TTI) commercial success – industry and consumer attitudes
      8. 14.7 Cases of time-temperature integrator (TTI) applications
      9. 14.8 Future trends
      10. 14.9 Acknowledgements
    4. Chapter 15: Development of a nanocomposite meal bag for individual military rations
      1. Abstract:
      2. 15.1 Introduction
      3. 15.2 Introduction of the Meal Ready-to-Eat™ (MRE)
      4. 15.3 Research and development of the MRE™ nanocomposite Meal Bag
      5. 15.4 Future trends
  12. Part IV: Innovations in advanced food processing techniques and predictive microbial models: case studies
    1. Chapter 16: Developments in in-container retort technology: the Zinetec Shaka® process
      1. Abstract:
      2. 16.1 Introduction
      3. 16.2 The Shaka® process
      4. 16.3 Product quality and the Shaka® process
      5. 16.4 Commercialization of the Shaka® process
      6. 16.5 Future trends
      7. 16.6 Sources of further information and advice
    2. Chapter 17: Industrial microwave heating of food: principles and three case studies of its commercialization
      1. Abstract:
      2. 17.1 Introduction
      3. 17.2 Fundamental properties of microwaves
      4. 17.3 How microwaves heat materials
      5. 17.4 Industrial, microwave equipment
      6. 17.5 Case studies
      7. 17.6 Conclusions
    3. Chapter 18: Irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables: principles and considerations for further commercialization
      1. Abstract:
      2. 18.1 Introduction
      3. 18.2 Technology and dosimetry
      4. 18.3 Application of irradiation on fresh produce
      5. 18.4 Considerations and challenges for commercialization in the US
      6. 18.5 Conclusions
      7. 18.6 Sources of further information and advice
      8. 18.7 Disclaimer
    4. Chapter 19: Consumer acceptance and marketing of irradiated meat
      1. Abstract:
      2. 19.1 Introduction
      3. 19.2 Time to take a fresh look at irradiation
      4. 19.3 History of irradiation of foods
      5. 19.4 Education: the key to consumer acceptance
      6. 19.5 Future trends
      7. 19.6 Conclusion
    5. Chapter 20: Comparing the effectiveness of thermal and non-thermal food preservation processes: the concept of equivalent efficacy
      1. Abstract:
      2. 20.1 Introduction
      3. 20.2 Traditional microbial mortality kinetics and sterility measures
      4. 20.3 Non-linear kinetics of microbial inactivation and deterioration processes involving nutrient or quality losses
      5. 20.4 Equivalence criteria
      6. 20.5 Freeware
      7. 20.6 Conclusions
      8. 20.7 Disclaimer
    6. Chapter 21: A case study in military ration foods: the Quasi-chemical model and a novel accelerated three-year challenge test
      1. Abstract:
      2. 21.1 Introduction
      3. 21.2 Modeling S. aureus growth in intermediate moisture (IM) bread
      4. 21.3 Microbial challenge study of Maple-filled French toast
      5. 21.4 Results of the microbial challenge study
      6. 21.5 Conclusions and future trends
  13. Index