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C++ For Dummies, 7th Edition by Stephen R. Davis

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Chapter 28

Writing Hacker-Proof Code

In This Chapter

arrow How to avoid becoming a soldier in someone's botnet army

arrow Getting a handle on SQL injection

arrow Understanding buffer overflow hacks

arrow Defensive programming against buffer overflows

arrow Getting a little help from the operating system

In the interest of full disclosure, I should admit right now: I'm not sure that it's possible to write hacker-proof code. Those slippery devils always seem to find a way. But by knowing some of their tricks and how to counter them, you can write programs that are very hacker resistant.

There is more to hacker-proofing that just writing code. Program protection takes a multitude of forms which I describe in Chapter 30. However, since this book is about writing programs, after all, and since code writing is probably the most important component to hacker-proofing, let's start there.

Understanding the Hacker's Motives

Why would a hacker want to break into one of the lowly C++ console programs presented in this book? ...

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