You are previewing Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers.

Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers

  1. Copyright
  2. Preface-1
  3. Preface-2
  4. Preface-3
  5. Seven Faces of Business Model Innovation
  6. 1. Canvas
    1. 1.1. Def_Business Model
    2. 1.2. The 9 Building Blocks
      1. 1.2.1. For whom are we creating value? Who are our most important customers?
    3. 1.3. The Business Model Canvas
      1. 1.3.1. Example: Apple iPod/iTunes Business Model
  7. 2. Patterns
    1. 2.1. Un-Bundling Business Models
    2. 2.2. The Long Tail
      1. 2.2.1. Old Model
      2. 2.2.2. A New Model
    3. 2.3. Multi-Sided Platforms
      1. 2.3.1. PSP/Xbox Focus
      2. 2.3.2. Wii Focus
    4. 2.4. FREE as a Business Model
    5. 2.5. Open Business Models
  8. 3. Design
    1. 3.1. Technique_No.1: Customer Insights
      1. 3.1.1. Building Business Models on Customer Insights
      2. 3.1.2. The Empathy Map
      3. 3.1.3. Understanding a B2B customer using the Empathy Map
    2. 3.2. Technique_No.2: Ideation
      1. 3.2.1. Generating New Business Model Ideas
      2. 3.2.2. Epicenters of Business Model Innovation
      3. 3.2.3. The Power of "What If" Questions
      4. 3.2.4. The Ideation Process
      5. 3.2.5. Assemble a Diverse Team
      6. 3.2.6. Brainstorming Rules
      7. 3.2.7. Warm-Up: The Silly Cow Exercise
    3. 3.3. Technique_No.3: Visual Thinking
      1. 3.3.1. The Value of Visual Thinking
      2. 3.3.2. Visualizing with Post-it™ Notes
      3. 3.3.3. Visualizing with Drawings
      4. 3.3.4. Understand the Essence
      5. 3.3.5. Enhance Dialogue
      6. 3.3.6. Explore Ideas
      7. 3.3.7. Improve Communication
      8. 3.3.8. Different Types of Visualization for Different needs
      9. 3.3.9. Telling a Visual Story
      10. 3.3.10. Visual Storytelling Activity
    4. 3.4. Technique_No.4: Prototyping
      1. 3.4.1. Prototyping's Value
      2. 3.4.2. Design Attitude
      3. 3.4.3. Prototypes at Different Scales
      4. 3.4.4. Eight Business Model Prototypes for Publishing a Book
      5. 3.4.5. Wanted: A New Consulting Business Model
    5. 3.5. Technique_No.5: Storytelling
      1. 3.5.1. Storytelling's Value
      2. 3.5.2. Why Storytelling?
      3. 3.5.3. Making Business Models Tangible?
      4. 3.5.4. Making the Future Tangible
      5. 3.5.5. Developing the Story
      6. 3.5.6. Techniques
      7. 3.5.7. SuperToast, Inc. Business Model
    6. 3.6. Technique_No.6: Scenarios
      1. 3.6.1. Scenario-Guided Business Model Design
      2. 3.6.2. Explore Ideas
      3. 3.6.3. Future Scenarios
      4. 3.6.4. Pharma Business Models of the Future
      5. 3.6.5. Scenario D: Reinventing Pharma
      6. 3.6.6. Future Scenarios and new Business Models
      7. 3.6.7. Further Reading on Design and Business
  9. 4. Strategy
    1. 4.1. BUSINESS MODEL ENVIRONMENT: CONTEXT, DESIGN DRIVERS, AND CONSTRAINTS
    2. 4.2. EVALUATING BUSINESS MODELS
      1. 4.2.1. ASSESSING THREATS
      2. 4.2.2. ASSESSING OPPORTUNITIES
      3. 4.2.3. USING SWOT ASSESSMENT ANALYSIS RESULTS TO DESIGN NEW BUSINESS MODEL OPTIONS
    3. 4.3. BUSINESS MODEL PERSPECTIVE ON BLUE OCEAN STRATEGY
      1. 4.3.1. BLENDING THE BLUE OCEAN STRATEGY FRAMEWORK WITH THE BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS
      2. 4.3.2. QUESTIONING YOUR CANVAS WITH THE FOUR ACTIONS FRAMEWORK
    4. 4.4. MANAGING MULTIPLE BUSINESS MODELS
      1. 4.4.1. SMH'S AUTONOMOUS MODEL FOR SWATCH
      2. 4.4.2. THE NESPRESSO SUCCESS MODEL
      3. 4.4.3. NESTLé'S PORTFOLIO OF COFFEE BUSINESS MODELS
      4. 4.4.4. DAIMLER'S CAR2GO BUSINESS MODEL
  10. 5. Process
    1. 5.1. Business Model Design Process
      1. 5.1.1. Design Attitude
      2. 5.1.2. 5 Phases
  11. A. Outlook
  12. B. Afterword
    1. B.1. WHERE DID THIS BOOK COME FROM?
    2. B.2. REFERENCES
  13. C. MARKET RESPONSE
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Chapter 5. Process

Business Model Design Process

In this chapter we tie together the concepts and tools from the book to simplify the task of setting up and executing a business model design initiative. We propose a generic business model design process adaptable to your organization's specific needs.

Every business model design project is unique, and presents its own challenges, obstacles, and critical success factors. Every organization starts from a different point and has its own context and objectives when it begins addressing an issue as fundamental as its business model. Some may be reacting to a crisis situation, some may be seeking new growth potential, some may be in startup mode, and still others may be planning to bring a new product or technology to market.

The process we describe provides a starting point upon which just about any organization can customize its own approach. Our process has five phases: Mobilize, Understand, Design, Implement, and Manage. We describe each of these phases in a general way, then revisit them from the perspective of the established organization, as business model innovation in enterprises already executing on one or more existing business models requires taking additional factors into account.

Business model innovation results from one of four objectives: (1) to satisfy existing but unanswered market needs, (2) to bring new technologies, products, or services to market, (3) to improve, disrupt, or transform an existing market with a better ...

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