You are previewing Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers.

Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers

  1. Copyright
  2. Preface-1
  3. Preface-2
  4. Preface-3
  5. Seven Faces of Business Model Innovation
  6. 1. Canvas
    1. 1.1. Def_Business Model
    2. 1.2. The 9 Building Blocks
      1. 1.2.1. For whom are we creating value? Who are our most important customers?
    3. 1.3. The Business Model Canvas
      1. 1.3.1. Example: Apple iPod/iTunes Business Model
  7. 2. Patterns
    1. 2.1. Un-Bundling Business Models
    2. 2.2. The Long Tail
      1. 2.2.1. Old Model
      2. 2.2.2. A New Model
    3. 2.3. Multi-Sided Platforms
      1. 2.3.1. PSP/Xbox Focus
      2. 2.3.2. Wii Focus
    4. 2.4. FREE as a Business Model
    5. 2.5. Open Business Models
  8. 3. Design
    1. 3.1. Technique_No.1: Customer Insights
      1. 3.1.1. Building Business Models on Customer Insights
      2. 3.1.2. The Empathy Map
      3. 3.1.3. Understanding a B2B customer using the Empathy Map
    2. 3.2. Technique_No.2: Ideation
      1. 3.2.1. Generating New Business Model Ideas
      2. 3.2.2. Epicenters of Business Model Innovation
      3. 3.2.3. The Power of "What If" Questions
      4. 3.2.4. The Ideation Process
      5. 3.2.5. Assemble a Diverse Team
      6. 3.2.6. Brainstorming Rules
      7. 3.2.7. Warm-Up: The Silly Cow Exercise
    3. 3.3. Technique_No.3: Visual Thinking
      1. 3.3.1. The Value of Visual Thinking
      2. 3.3.2. Visualizing with Post-it™ Notes
      3. 3.3.3. Visualizing with Drawings
      4. 3.3.4. Understand the Essence
      5. 3.3.5. Enhance Dialogue
      6. 3.3.6. Explore Ideas
      7. 3.3.7. Improve Communication
      8. 3.3.8. Different Types of Visualization for Different needs
      9. 3.3.9. Telling a Visual Story
      10. 3.3.10. Visual Storytelling Activity
    4. 3.4. Technique_No.4: Prototyping
      1. 3.4.1. Prototyping's Value
      2. 3.4.2. Design Attitude
      3. 3.4.3. Prototypes at Different Scales
      4. 3.4.4. Eight Business Model Prototypes for Publishing a Book
      5. 3.4.5. Wanted: A New Consulting Business Model
    5. 3.5. Technique_No.5: Storytelling
      1. 3.5.1. Storytelling's Value
      2. 3.5.2. Why Storytelling?
      3. 3.5.3. Making Business Models Tangible?
      4. 3.5.4. Making the Future Tangible
      5. 3.5.5. Developing the Story
      6. 3.5.6. Techniques
      7. 3.5.7. SuperToast, Inc. Business Model
    6. 3.6. Technique_No.6: Scenarios
      1. 3.6.1. Scenario-Guided Business Model Design
      2. 3.6.2. Explore Ideas
      3. 3.6.3. Future Scenarios
      4. 3.6.4. Pharma Business Models of the Future
      5. 3.6.5. Scenario D: Reinventing Pharma
      6. 3.6.6. Future Scenarios and new Business Models
      7. 3.6.7. Further Reading on Design and Business
  9. 4. Strategy
    1. 4.1. BUSINESS MODEL ENVIRONMENT: CONTEXT, DESIGN DRIVERS, AND CONSTRAINTS
    2. 4.2. EVALUATING BUSINESS MODELS
      1. 4.2.1. ASSESSING THREATS
      2. 4.2.2. ASSESSING OPPORTUNITIES
      3. 4.2.3. USING SWOT ASSESSMENT ANALYSIS RESULTS TO DESIGN NEW BUSINESS MODEL OPTIONS
    3. 4.3. BUSINESS MODEL PERSPECTIVE ON BLUE OCEAN STRATEGY
      1. 4.3.1. BLENDING THE BLUE OCEAN STRATEGY FRAMEWORK WITH THE BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS
      2. 4.3.2. QUESTIONING YOUR CANVAS WITH THE FOUR ACTIONS FRAMEWORK
    4. 4.4. MANAGING MULTIPLE BUSINESS MODELS
      1. 4.4.1. SMH'S AUTONOMOUS MODEL FOR SWATCH
      2. 4.4.2. THE NESPRESSO SUCCESS MODEL
      3. 4.4.3. NESTLé'S PORTFOLIO OF COFFEE BUSINESS MODELS
      4. 4.4.4. DAIMLER'S CAR2GO BUSINESS MODEL
  10. 5. Process
    1. 5.1. Business Model Design Process
      1. 5.1.1. Design Attitude
      2. 5.1.2. 5 Phases
  11. A. Outlook
  12. B. Afterword
    1. B.1. WHERE DID THIS BOOK COME FROM?
    2. B.2. REFERENCES
  13. C. MARKET RESPONSE
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Chapter 3. Design

"Businesspeople don't just need to understand designers better; they need to become designers."

Roger Martin, Dean, Rotman School of Management

This section describes a number of techniques and tools from the world of design that can help you design better and more innovative business models. A designer's business involves relentless inquiry into the best possible way to create the new, discover the unexplored, or achieve the functional. A designer's job is to extend the boundaries of thought, to generate new options, and, ultimately, to create value for users. This requires the ability to imagine "that which does not exist." We are convinced that the tools and attitude of the design profession are prerequisites for success in the business model generation.

Businesspeople unknowingly practice design every day. We design organizations, strategies, business models, processes, and projects. To do this, we must take into account a complex web of factors, such as competitors, technology, the legal environment, and more. Increasingly, we must do so in unfamiliar, uncharted territory. This is precisely what design is about. What businesspeople lack are design tools that complement their business skills.

The following pages explore six business model design techniques: Customer Insights, Ideation, Visual Thinking, Prototyping, Storytelling, and Scenarios. We introduce each technique with a story, then demonstrate how the technique applies to business model design. Here and ...

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