You are previewing Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers.

Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers

  1. Copyright
  2. Preface-1
  3. Preface-2
  4. Preface-3
  5. Seven Faces of Business Model Innovation
  6. 1. Canvas
    1. 1.1. Def_Business Model
    2. 1.2. The 9 Building Blocks
      1. 1.2.1. For whom are we creating value? Who are our most important customers?
    3. 1.3. The Business Model Canvas
      1. 1.3.1. Example: Apple iPod/iTunes Business Model
  7. 2. Patterns
    1. 2.1. Un-Bundling Business Models
    2. 2.2. The Long Tail
      1. 2.2.1. Old Model
      2. 2.2.2. A New Model
    3. 2.3. Multi-Sided Platforms
      1. 2.3.1. PSP/Xbox Focus
      2. 2.3.2. Wii Focus
    4. 2.4. FREE as a Business Model
    5. 2.5. Open Business Models
  8. 3. Design
    1. 3.1. Technique_No.1: Customer Insights
      1. 3.1.1. Building Business Models on Customer Insights
      2. 3.1.2. The Empathy Map
      3. 3.1.3. Understanding a B2B customer using the Empathy Map
    2. 3.2. Technique_No.2: Ideation
      1. 3.2.1. Generating New Business Model Ideas
      2. 3.2.2. Epicenters of Business Model Innovation
      3. 3.2.3. The Power of "What If" Questions
      4. 3.2.4. The Ideation Process
      5. 3.2.5. Assemble a Diverse Team
      6. 3.2.6. Brainstorming Rules
      7. 3.2.7. Warm-Up: The Silly Cow Exercise
    3. 3.3. Technique_No.3: Visual Thinking
      1. 3.3.1. The Value of Visual Thinking
      2. 3.3.2. Visualizing with Post-it™ Notes
      3. 3.3.3. Visualizing with Drawings
      4. 3.3.4. Understand the Essence
      5. 3.3.5. Enhance Dialogue
      6. 3.3.6. Explore Ideas
      7. 3.3.7. Improve Communication
      8. 3.3.8. Different Types of Visualization for Different needs
      9. 3.3.9. Telling a Visual Story
      10. 3.3.10. Visual Storytelling Activity
    4. 3.4. Technique_No.4: Prototyping
      1. 3.4.1. Prototyping's Value
      2. 3.4.2. Design Attitude
      3. 3.4.3. Prototypes at Different Scales
      4. 3.4.4. Eight Business Model Prototypes for Publishing a Book
      5. 3.4.5. Wanted: A New Consulting Business Model
    5. 3.5. Technique_No.5: Storytelling
      1. 3.5.1. Storytelling's Value
      2. 3.5.2. Why Storytelling?
      3. 3.5.3. Making Business Models Tangible?
      4. 3.5.4. Making the Future Tangible
      5. 3.5.5. Developing the Story
      6. 3.5.6. Techniques
      7. 3.5.7. SuperToast, Inc. Business Model
    6. 3.6. Technique_No.6: Scenarios
      1. 3.6.1. Scenario-Guided Business Model Design
      2. 3.6.2. Explore Ideas
      3. 3.6.3. Future Scenarios
      4. 3.6.4. Pharma Business Models of the Future
      5. 3.6.5. Scenario D: Reinventing Pharma
      6. 3.6.6. Future Scenarios and new Business Models
      7. 3.6.7. Further Reading on Design and Business
  9. 4. Strategy
    1. 4.1. BUSINESS MODEL ENVIRONMENT: CONTEXT, DESIGN DRIVERS, AND CONSTRAINTS
    2. 4.2. EVALUATING BUSINESS MODELS
      1. 4.2.1. ASSESSING THREATS
      2. 4.2.2. ASSESSING OPPORTUNITIES
      3. 4.2.3. USING SWOT ASSESSMENT ANALYSIS RESULTS TO DESIGN NEW BUSINESS MODEL OPTIONS
    3. 4.3. BUSINESS MODEL PERSPECTIVE ON BLUE OCEAN STRATEGY
      1. 4.3.1. BLENDING THE BLUE OCEAN STRATEGY FRAMEWORK WITH THE BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS
      2. 4.3.2. QUESTIONING YOUR CANVAS WITH THE FOUR ACTIONS FRAMEWORK
    4. 4.4. MANAGING MULTIPLE BUSINESS MODELS
      1. 4.4.1. SMH'S AUTONOMOUS MODEL FOR SWATCH
      2. 4.4.2. THE NESPRESSO SUCCESS MODEL
      3. 4.4.3. NESTLé'S PORTFOLIO OF COFFEE BUSINESS MODELS
      4. 4.4.4. DAIMLER'S CAR2GO BUSINESS MODEL
  10. 5. Process
    1. 5.1. Business Model Design Process
      1. 5.1.1. Design Attitude
      2. 5.1.2. 5 Phases
  11. A. Outlook
  12. B. Afterword
    1. B.1. WHERE DID THIS BOOK COME FROM?
    2. B.2. REFERENCES
  13. C. MARKET RESPONSE
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Appendix B. Afterword

WHERE DID THIS BOOK COME FROM?

CONTEXT

2004: Alexander Osterwalder completes a Ph.D. dissertation on the topic of business model innovation with Professor Yves Pigneur at HEC Lausanne, Switzerland. Fast forward. 2006: The approach outlined in the dissertation starts being applied around the world based on Alexander's business model blog, notably in companies such as 3M, Ericsson, Deloitte, and Telenor. During a workshop in the Netherlands Patrick van der Pijl asks "why is there no book accompanying the method?" Alexander and Yves take up the challenge. But how does one stand out in a market where countless strategy and management books are published every year?

INNOVATING THE MODEL

Alexander and Yves decide they can't credibly write a book about business model innovation without an innovative business model. They ditch publishers and launch the Hub, an online platform to share their writings from day one. Anybody with an interest in the topic can join the platform for a fee (initially U.S. $24, which is gradually raised to U.S. $243 to keep the platform exclusive). That this and other innovative Revenue Streams finance the book production in advance itself is an innovation as well. It breaks the format of conventional strategy and management books in order to create more value for readers: it is co-created highly visual, and complemented by exercises and workshop tips

KEY AUDIENCE

visionary and game changing . . . entrepreneurs / consultants / executives

MADE IN

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