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Business Data Communications and Networking

Book Description

Over the past few years, many fundamental changes have occurred in data communications and networking that will shape the future for decades to come.

Updated with the latest advances in the field, Jerry FitzGerald and Alan Dennis' 10th Edition of Business Data Communications and Networking continues to provide the fundamental concepts and cutting-edge coverage applications that students need to succeed in this fast-moving field. 

Authors FitzGerald and Dennis have developed a foundation and balanced presentation from which new technologies and applications can be easily understood, evaluated, and compared.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. ABOUT THE AUTHORS
  3. PREFACE
    1. PURPOSE OF THIS BOOK
    2. WHAT'S NEW IN THIS EDITION
      1. Online Animations www.wiley.com/college/fitzgerald
      2. Lab Exercises www.wiley.com/college/fitzgerald
      3. Online Supplements for Instructors www.wiley.com/college/fitzgerald
  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  5. I. INTRODUCTION
    1. 1. INTRODUCTION TO DATA COMMUNICATIONS
      1. 1.1. INTRODUCTION
        1. 1.1.1. A Brief History of Communications in North America
        2. 1.1.2. A Brief History of Information Systems
        3. 1.1.3. A Brief History of the Internet
      2. 1.2. DATA COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
        1. 1.2.1. Components of a Network
        2. 1.2.2. Types of Networks
      3. 1.3. NETWORK MODELS
        1. 1.3.1. Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model
        2. 1.3.2. Internet Model
        3. 1.3.3. Message Transmission Using Layers
      4. 1.4. NETWORK STANDARDS
        1. 1.4.1. The Importance of Standards
        2. 1.4.2. The Standards-Making Process
        3. 1.4.3. Common Standards
      5. 1.5. FUTURE TRENDS
        1. 1.5.1. Pervasive Networking
        2. 1.5.2. The Integration of Voice, Video, and Data
        3. 1.5.3. New Information Services
      6. 1.6. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
      7. 1.7. SUMMARY
      8. 1.8. KEY TERMS
      9. 1.9. QUESTIONS
      10. 1.10. EXERCISES
      11. 1.11. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
        1. 1.11.1. Convergence at Home
  6. II. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS
  7. 2. APPLICATION LAYER
    1. 2.1. INTRODUCTION
    2. 2.2. APPLICATION ARCHITECTURES
      1. 2.2.1. Host-Based Architectures
      2. 2.2.2. Client-Based Architectures
      3. 2.2.3. Client-Server Architectures
      4. 2.2.4. Peer-to-Peer Architectures
      5. 2.2.5. Choosing Architectures
    3. 2.3. WORLD WIDE WEB
      1. 2.3.1. How the Web Works
      2. 2.3.2. Inside an HTTP Request
      3. 2.3.3. Inside an HTTP Response
    4. 2.4. ELECTRONIC MAIL
      1. 2.4.1. How E-mail Works
      2. 2.4.2. Inside an SMTP Packet
      3. 2.4.3. Listserv Discussion Groups
      4. 2.4.4. Attachments in Multipurpose Internet Mail Extension
    5. 2.5. OTHER APPLICATIONS
      1. 2.5.1. File Transfer Protocol
      2. 2.5.2. Telnet
      3. 2.5.3. Instant Messaging
      4. 2.5.4. Videoconferencing
    6. 2.6. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    7. 2.7. SUMMARY
    8. 2.8. KEY TERMS
    9. 2.9. QUESTIONS
    10. 2.10. EXERCISES
    11. 2.11. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 2.11.1. Looking Inside Your HTTP Packets
    12. 2.12. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 2.12.1. Tracing Your E-mail
  8. 3. PHYSICAL LAYER
    1. 3.1. INTRODUCTION
    2. 3.2. CIRCUITS
      1. 3.2.1. Circuit Configuration
      2. 3.2.2. Data Flow
      3. 3.2.3. Multiplexing
      4. 3.2.4. How DSL Transmits Data
    3. 3.3. COMMUNICATION MEDIA
      1. 3.3.1. Guided Media
      2. 3.3.2. Wireless Media
      3. 3.3.3. Media Selection
    4. 3.4. DIGITAL TRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL DATA
      1. 3.4.1. Coding
      2. 3.4.2. Transmission Modes
      3. 3.4.3. Digital Transmission
      4. 3.4.4. How Ethernet Transmits Data
    5. 3.5. ANALOG TRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL DATA
      1. 3.5.1. Modulation
      2. 3.5.2. Capacity of a Circuit
      3. 3.5.3. How Modems Transmit Data
    6. 3.6. DIGITAL TRANSMISSION OF ANALOG DATA
      1. 3.6.1. Translating from Analog to Digital
      2. 3.6.2. How Telephones Transmit Voice Data
      3. 3.6.3. How Instant Messenger Transmits Voice Data
      4. 3.6.4. Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
    7. 3.7. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    8. 3.8. SUMMARY
    9. 3.9. KEY TERMS
    10. 3.10. QUESTIONS
    11. 3.11. EXERCISES
    12. 3.12. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 3.12.1. Looking Inside Your Cable
    13. 3.13. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 3.13.1. Making MP3 Files
  9. 4. DATA LINK LAYER
    1. 4.1. INTRODUCTION
    2. 4.2. MEDIA ACCESS CONTROL
      1. 4.2.1. Controlled Access
      2. 4.2.2. Contention
      3. 4.2.3. Relative Performance
    3. 4.3. ERROR CONTROL
      1. 4.3.1. Sources of Errors
      2. 4.3.2. Error Prevention
        1. 4.3.2.1. Error Detection
      3. 4.3.3. Error Correction via Retransmission
      4. 4.3.4. Forward Error Correction
      5. 4.3.5. Error Control in Practice
    4. 4.4. DATA LINK PROTOCOLS
      1. 4.4.1. Asynchronous Transmission
      2. 4.4.2. Synchronous Transmission
    5. 4.5. TRANSMISSION EFFICIENCY
    6. 4.6. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    7. 4.7. SUMMARY
    8. 4.8. KEY TERMS
    9. 4.9. QUESTIONS
    10. 4.10. EXERCISES
    11. 4.11. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 4.11.1. Capturing Packets on Your Network
  10. 5. NETWORK AND TRANSPORT LAYERS
    1. 5.1. INTRODUCTION
    2. 5.2. TRANSPORT AND NETWORK LAYER PROTOCOLS
      1. 5.2.1. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
      2. 5.2.2. Internet Protocol (IP)
    3. 5.3. TRANSPORT LAYER FUNCTIONS
      1. 5.3.1. Linking to the Application Layer
      2. 5.3.2. Segmenting
      3. 5.3.3. Session Management
    4. 5.4. ADDRESSING
      1. 5.4.1. Assigning Addresses
      2. 5.4.2. Address Resolution
    5. 5.5. ROUTING
      1. 5.5.1. Types of Routing
      2. 5.5.2. Routing Protocols
      3. 5.5.3. Multicasting
    6. 5.6. TCP/IP EXAMPLE
      1. 5.6.1. Known Addresses, Same Subnet
      2. 5.6.2. Known Addresses, Different Subnet
      3. 5.6.3. Unknown Addresses
      4. 5.6.4. TCP Connections
      5. 5.6.5. TCP/IP and Network Layers
    7. 5.7. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    8. 5.8. SUMMARY
    9. 5.9. KEY TERMS
    10. 5.10. QUESTIONS
    11. 5.11. EXERCISES
    12. 5.12. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 5.12.1. Using TCP/IP
        1. 5.12.1.1. IPCONFIG: Reading your computer's settings
        2. 5.12.1.2. PING: Finding other computers
        3. 5.12.1.3. ARP: Displaying Physical Addresses
        4. 5.12.1.4. NSLOOKUP: Finding IP Addresses
        5. 5.12.1.5. DNS Cache
        6. 5.12.1.6. TRACERT: Finding Routes through the Internet
    13. 5.13. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 5.13.1. Watching TCP/IP in Action
  11. III. NETWORK TECHNOLOGIES
  12. 6. LOCAL AREA NETWORKS
    1. 6.1. INTRODUCTION
      1. 6.1.1. Why Use a LAN?
      2. 6.1.2. Dedicated-Server versus Peer-to-Peer LANs
    2. 6.2. LAN COMPONENTS
      1. 6.2.1. Network Interface Cards
      2. 6.2.2. Network Cables
      3. 6.2.3. Network Hubs and Switches
      4. 6.2.4. Network Operating Systems
    3. 6.3. TRADITIONAL ETHERNET [IEEE 802.3]
      1. 6.3.1. Topology
      2. 6.3.2. Media Access Control
      3. 6.3.3. Types of Ethernet
    4. 6.4. SWITCHED ETHERNET
      1. 6.4.1. Topology
      2. 6.4.2. Media Access Control
      3. 6.4.3. Performance Benefits
    5. 6.5. THE BEST PRACTICE LAN DESIGN
    6. 6.6. IMPROVING LAN PERFORMANCE
      1. 6.6.1. Improving Server Performance
      2. 6.6.2. Improving Circuit Capacity
      3. 6.6.3. Reducing Network Demand
    7. 6.7. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    8. 6.8. SUMMARY
    9. 6.9. KEY TERMS
    10. 6.10. QUESTIONS
    11. 6.11. EXERCISES
    12. 6.12. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 6.12.1.
        1. 6.12.1.1. Windows File Sharing
        2. 6.12.1.2. Windows Printer Sharing
    13. 6.13. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 6.13.1. Tracing Ethernet
  13. 7. WIRELESS LOCAL AREA NETWORKS
    1. 7.1. INTRODUCTION
    2. 7.2. WLAN COMPONENTS
      1. 7.2.1. Network Interface Cards
      2. 7.2.2. Access Points
      3. 7.2.3. Radio Frequencies
    3. 7.3. WI-FI
      1. 7.3.1. Topology
      2. 7.3.2. Media Access Control
      3. 7.3.3. Types of Wi-Fi
      4. 7.3.4. Wi-Fi as Public Internet Access
    4. 7.4. WIMAX
      1. 7.4.1. Topology
      2. 7.4.2. Media Access Control
      3. 7.4.3. Types of WiMAX
    5. 7.5. BLUETOOTH
      1. 7.5.1. Topology
      2. 7.5.2. Media Access Control
    6. 7.6. THE BEST PRACTICE WLAN DESIGN
      1. 7.6.1. Recommendations
      2. 7.6.2. Physical WLAN Design
      3. 7.6.3. WLAN Security
    7. 7.7. IMPROVING WLAN PERFORMANCE
      1. 7.7.1. Improving Device Performance
      2. 7.7.2. Improving Circuit Capacity
      3. 7.7.3. Reducing Network Demand
    8. 7.8. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    9. 7.9. SUMMARY
    10. 7.10. KEY TERMS
    11. 7.11. QUESTIONS
    12. 7.12. EXERCISES
    13. 7.13. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 7.13.1. War-Driving and War-Walking
  14. 8. BACKBONE NETWORKS
    1. 8.1. INTRODUCTION
    2. 8.2. BACKBONE NETWORK COMPONENTS
      1. 8.2.1. Switches
      2. 8.2.2. Routers
      3. 8.2.3. Gateways
      4. 8.2.4. A Caution
    3. 8.3. BACKBONE NETWORK ARCHITECTURES
      1. 8.3.1. Backbone Architecture Layers
      2. 8.3.2. Switched Backbones
      3. 8.3.3. Routed Backbones
      4. 8.3.4. Virtual LANs
    4. 8.4. THE BEST PRACTICE BACKBONE DESIGN
    5. 8.5. IMPROVING BACKBONE PERFORMANCE
      1. 8.5.1. Improving Computer and Device Performance
      2. 8.5.2. Improving Circuit Capacity
      3. 8.5.3. Reducing Network Demand
    6. 8.6. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    7. 8.7. SUMMARY
    8. 8.8. KEY TERMS
    9. 8.9. QUESTIONS
    10. 8.10. EXERCISES
    11. 8.11. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 8.11.1. Network Mapping
        1. 8.11.1.1. Mapping A Small Network
        2. 8.11.1.2. Mapping A Large Network
  15. 9. METROPOLITAN AND WIDE AREA NETWORKS
    1. 9.1. INTRODUCTION
    2. 9.2. CIRCUIT-SWITCHED NETWORKS
      1. 9.2.1. Basic Architecture
      2. 9.2.2. Plain Old Telephone Service
      3. 9.2.3. ISDN
    3. 9.3. DEDICATED-CIRCUIT NETWORKS
      1. 9.3.1. Basic Architecture
      2. 9.3.2. T Carrier Services
      3. 9.3.3. Synchronous Optical Network
    4. 9.4. PACKET-SWITCHED NETWORKS
      1. 9.4.1. Basic Architecture
      2. 9.4.2. X.25
      3. 9.4.3. Asynchronous Transfer Mode
      4. 9.4.4. Frame Relay
      5. 9.4.5. Ethernet Services
    5. 9.5. VIRTUAL PRIVATE NETWORKS
      1. 9.5.1. Basic Architecture
      2. 9.5.2. VPN Types
      3. 9.5.3. How VPNs Work
    6. 9.6. THE BEST PRACTICE MAN/WAN DESIGN
    7. 9.7. IMPROVING MAN/WAN PERFORMANCE
      1. 9.7.1. Improving Device Performance
      2. 9.7.2. Improving Circuit Capacity
      3. 9.7.3. Reducing Network Demand
    8. 9.8. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    9. 9.9. SUMMARY
    10. 9.10. KEY TERMS
    11. 9.11. QUESTIONS
    12. 9.12. EXERCISES
    13. 9.13. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 9.13.1. Examining Wide Area Neworks
    14. 9.14. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 9.14.1. Examining VPNs with Wireshark
    15. 9.15. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 9.15.1. Examining VPNs with Tracert
  16. 10. THE INTERNET
    1. 10.1. INTRODUCTION
    2. 10.2. HOW THE INTERNET WORKS
      1. 10.2.1. Basic Architecture
      2. 10.2.2. Connecting to an ISP
      3. 10.2.3. The Internet Today
    3. 10.3. INTERNET ACCESS TECHNOLOGIES
      1. 10.3.1. DSL
      2. 10.3.2. Cable Modems
      3. 10.3.3. Fixed Wireless
      4. 10.3.4. Mobile Wireless
      5. 10.3.5. Future Technologies
    4. 10.4. INTERNET GOVERNANCE
    5. 10.5. INTERNET2
    6. 10.6. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    7. 10.7. SUMMARY
    8. 10.8. KEY TERMS
    9. 10.9. QUESTIONS
    10. 10.10. EXERCISES
    11. 10.11. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 10.11.1. Seeing the Internet
  17. IV. NETWORK MANAGEMENT
  18. 11. NETWORK SECURITY
    1. 11.1. INTRODUCTION
      1. 11.1.1. Why Networks Need Security
      2. 11.1.2. Types of Security Threats
      3. 11.1.3. Network Controls
    2. 11.2. RISK ASSESSMENT
      1. 11.2.1. Develop a Control Spreadsheet
      2. 11.2.2. Identify and Document the Controls
      3. 11.2.3. Evaluate the Network's Security
    3. 11.3. ENSURING BUSINESS CONTINUITY
      1. 11.3.1. Virus Protection
      2. 11.3.2. Denial-of-Service Protection
      3. 11.3.3. Theft Protection
      4. 11.3.4. Device Failure Protection
      5. 11.3.5. Disaster Protection
    4. 11.4. INTRUSION PREVENTION
      1. 11.4.1. Security Policy
      2. 11.4.2. Perimeter Security and Firewalls
      3. 11.4.3. Server and Client Protection
      4. 11.4.4. Encryption
      5. 11.4.5. User Authentication
      6. 11.4.6. Preventing Social Engineering
      7. 11.4.7. Intrusion Prevention Systems
      8. 11.4.8. Intrusion Recovery
    5. 11.5. BEST PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS
    6. 11.6. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    7. 11.7. SUMMARY
    8. 11.8. KEY TERMS
    9. 11.9. QUESTIONS
    10. 11.10. EXERCISES
    11. 11.11. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 11.11.1. Securing Your Computer
        1. 11.11.1.1. Business Continuity
        2. 11.11.1.2. Intrusion Prevention
    12. 11.12. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 11.12.1. Testing Your Computer's Intrusion Prevention
  19. 12. NETWORK DESIGN
    1. 12.1. INTRODUCTION
      1. 12.1.1. The Traditional Network Design Process
      2. 12.2.2. The Building-Block Network Design Process
    2. 12.2. NEEDS ANALYSIS
      1. 12.2.1. Geographic Scope
      2. 12.2.2. Application Systems
      3. 12.2.3. Network Users
      4. 12.2.4. Categorizing Network Needs
      5. 12.2.5. Deliverables
    3. 12.3. TECHNOLOGY DESIGN
      1. 12.3.1. Designing Clients and Servers
      2. 12.3.2. Designing Circuits and Devices
      3. 12.3.3. Network Design Tools
      4. 12.3.4. Deliverables
    4. 12.4. COST ASSESSMENT
      1. 12.4.1. Request for Proposal
      2. 12.4.2. Selling the Proposal to Management
      3. 12.4.3. Deliverables
    5. 12.5. DESIGNING FOR NETWORK PERFORMANCE
      1. 12.5.1. Managed Networks
      2. 12.5.2. Network Circuits
      3. 12.5.3. Network Devices
      4. 12.5.4. Minimizing Network Traffic
    6. 12.6. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    7. 12.7. SUMMARY
    8. 12.8. KEY TERMS
    9. 12.9. QUESTIONS
    10. 12.10. EXERCISES
    11. 12.11. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 12.11.1. Network Design Software
    12. 12.12. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 12.12.1. Monitoring AT&T's WAN
  20. 13. NETWORK MANAGEMENT
    1. 13.1. INTRODUCTION
    2. 13.2. ORGANIZING THE NETWORK MANAGEMENT FUNCTION
      1. 13.2.1. The Shift to LANs and the Internet
      2. 13.2.2. Integrating LANs, WANs, and the Internet
      3. 13.2.3. Integrating Voice and Data Communications
    3. 13.3. CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT
      1. 13.3.1. Configuring the Network and Client Computers
      2. 13.3.2. Documenting the Configuration
    4. 13.4. PERFORMANCE AND FAULT MANAGEMENT
      1. 13.4.1. Network Monitoring
      2. 13.4.2. Failure Control Function
      3. 13.4.3. Performance and Failure Statistics
      4. 13.4.4. Improving Performance
    5. 13.5. END USER SUPPORT
      1. 13.5.1. Resolving Problems
      2. 13.5.2. Providing End User Training
    6. 13.6. COST MANAGEMENT
      1. 13.6.1. Sources of Costs
      2. 13.6.2. Reducing Costs
    7. 13.7. IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT
    8. 13.8. SUMMARY
    9. 13.9. KEY TERMS
    10. 13.10. QUESTIONS
    11. 13.11. EXERCISES
    12. 13.12. HANDS-ON ACTIVITY
      1. 13.12.1. Network Monitoring
  21. V. APPENDICES
    1. A. CONNECTOR CABLES
      1. A.1. RS232 (DB-25)/RS449 (DB-9)
      2. A.2. NULL MODEM CABLE CONNECTIONS
      3. A.3. DATA SIGNALING/SYNCHRONIZATION
      4. A.4. ETHERNET AND RJ-45
        1. A.4.1. 10Base-T
        2. A.4.2. 100Base-T
        3. A.4.3. 1 GbE
      5. A.5. UNIVERSAL SERIAL BUS
      6. A.6. FIREWIRE
    2. B. SPANNING TREE PROTOCOL
    3. C. IP TELEPHONY
    4. D. CELLULAR TECHNOLOGIES
    5. E. TCP/IP GAME
      1. E.1. INTRODUCTION
        1. E.1.1. General Rules
      2. E.2. APPLICATION LAYER
        1. E.2.1. Activities
        2. E.2.2. Tools Needed
        3. E.2.3. Sending Outgoing Messages
        4. E.2.4. Responding to Incoming Messages
        5. E.2.5. List of Messages
      3. E.3. TRANSPORT LAYER
        1. E.3.1. Activities
        2. E.3.2. Tools Needed
        3. E.3.3. Accepting Outgoing Messages from the Application Layer
        4. E.3.4. Accepting Incoming Messages from the Network Layer
      4. E.4. NETWORK LAYER
        1. E.4.1. Activities
        2. E.4.2. Tools Needed
        3. E.4.3. Accepting Outgoing Messages from the Transport Layer
        4. E.4.4. Accepting Incoming Messages from the Data Link Layer
      5. E.5. DATA LINK LAYER
        1. E.5.1. Activities
        2. E.5.2. Tools Needed
        3. E.5.3. Accepting Outgoing Messages from the Network Layer
        4. E.5.4. Accepting Incoming Messages from the Physical Layer
      6. E.6. PHYSICAL LAYER
        1. E.6.1. Activities
        2. E.6.2. Tools Needed
        3. E.6.3. Accepting Messages from the Data Link Layer
        4. E.6.4. Accepting Messages from the Physical Layer of Another Computer
      7. E.7. NOTE TO INSTRUCTORS
        1. E.7.1. Background
      8. E.8. PREPARING TO TEACH THE GAME
      9. E.9. TEACHING THE GAME
        1. E.9.1. Discussion Questions
    6. F. WINDOWS SERVER
      1. F.1. MANAGING USER ACCOUNTS
        1. F.1.1. Creating Users
        2. F.1.2. Setting User Properties
        3. F.1.3. Creating Groups
        4. F.1.4. Adding Users to Groups
      2. F.2. MANAGING FILE SHARING
        1. F.2.1. Creating a Shared Folder
        2. F.2.2. Enabling Sharing
        3. F.2.3. Defining Security
  22. GLOSSARY