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Building a Digital Repository Program with Limited Resources

Book Description

Whether you are just starting to create a digital repository or your institution already has a fully-developed program, this book provides strategies for building and maintaining a high-use, cohesive, and fiscally-responsible repository with collections that showcase your institution. The book explains how to strategically select projects tied to your institution’s goals, create processes and workflows designed to support a fully-functioning program, and creatively utilize existing resources. The benefits of taking a holistic approach to creating a digital repository program rather than focusing only on individual collections are discussed. Case studies and best practices from various institutions round out the author’s practical suggestions.

  • Focuses on the bigger picture of repository work (creating a unified, cohesive program) but also includes suggestions for effectively implementing digital projects of all shapes and sizes
  • Focuses on doing more with less - strategies that are perfect for smaller institutions or institutions which want to be fiscally responsible when it comes to building and sustaining digital repository programs
  • Includes ready-to-use templates, worksheets, workshop exercises, and assessment tools written by the author

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. Foreword
  6. Preface
  7. List of figures
  8. About the author
  9. Part One
    1. Chapter 1: Introduction
      1. Opportunities for libraries
      2. Definitions
      3. Institutional repositories, digital projects, and digital repository programs
      4. Conclusion
    2. Chapter 2: Strategic planning
      1. The vision for a digital program
      2. Core constituencies’ needs
      3. Internal resource audit: infrastructure, resources, content
      4. Legal issues
      5. Determining what’s realistic
      6. Shaping the program: writing a mission statement
      7. Bigger than the repository program: aligning with institutional and organizational goals
      8. Putting it all together
    3. Chapter 3: Technical overview
      1. Introduction
      2. Guiding principles
      3. General structure of a digital repository system
      4. Understanding the institutional environment
      5. Repository Systems
      6. Working with multiple systems
      7. Partnership with IT
      8. Keeping down costs
      9. Conclusion
    4. Chapter 4: Staffing
      1. Assembling the team(s): staffing needs and considerations
      2. Digital repository program coordinator
      3. Digital program planning team
      4. Digital program steering group
      5. Project teams
      6. Metadata team
      7. Technical/infrastructure team
      8. Instructional technologists
      9. Getting IT staff involved in repository work
      10. Librarians and repository work
      11. Digital repository workgroups
      12. Library and information science interns
  10. Part Two
    1. Chapter 5: Metadata
      1. What is metadata?
      2. Definitions
      3. Guiding principles
      4. Types of metadata
      5. Metadata standards and protocols
      6. A-Z of metadata work
      7. Tools to support metadata production
      8. Complexity of metadata work
      9. The hands-on metadata workshop
      10. Conclusion
    2. Chapter 6: Collection building: project proposals, planning, implementation
      1. Introduction
      2. Guiding principles
      3. Project initiation: proposals and the review process
      4. Project planning
      5. Project implementation
      6. Monitoring
      7. Closing: launch
      8. Post-launch
    3. Chapter 7: Content recruitment and marketing
      1. Introduction
      2. Guiding principles
      3. Working with faculty
      4. Other potential partners within the institution
      5. What to show before you have collections
      6. Recruiting content from outside of the university
      7. Big and small ways to market your repository program
      8. Showcasing individual projects and collections
    4. Chapter 8: Open Access
      1. Introduction: what is open access?
      2. Guiding principles
      3. Nuts and bolts of open access
      4. Clarifying common misconceptions
      5. What does OA mean for libraries?
      6. Selling open access
    5. Chapter 9: Sustainability
      1. Introduction
      2. Guiding principles
      3. Sustaining digital objects
      4. Sustaining digital collections
      5. Sustaining repository teams
      6. Sustaining the repository program
    6. Chapter 10: Assessment
      1. Introduction
      2. Guiding principles
      3. Overview of the process
      4. Assessing the repository program and its services
      5. Collection-level usage data
      6. Conclusion
    7. Chapter 11: Web 2.0 and digital repositories
      1. Introduction
      2. Guiding principles
      3. Push content out; bring users in
      4. Integrate Web 2.0 tools with the repository
      5. User participation
  11. Concluding thoughts
  12. Appendix 1: Introduction to metadata workshop
  13. Appendix 2: The World War II Poster Project
  14. Bibliography
  15. Index