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Bridges, Pathways and Transitions

Book Description

Bridges, Pathways and Transitions: International Innovations in Widening Participation shows that widening participation initiatives and policies have had a profound impact on improving access to higher education to historically marginalized groups of students from diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds.

The research presented provides a source of inspiration to students who are navigating disadvantage to succeed in higher education against the odds. There are stories of success in difficult circumstances, revealing the resilience and determination of individuals and collectives to fight for a place in higher education to improve chances for securing social mobility for next generations.

The book also reveals that more work and policy interventions are needed to further equalize the playing field between social groups. Governments need to address the entrenched structural inequalities, particularly the effects of poverty, that prevent more academically able disadvantaged students from participating in higher education on the basis of the circumstances of their birth.

Across the globe, social reproduction is far more likely than social mobility because of policies and practices that continue to protect the privilege of those in the middle and top of social structures. With the gap between rich and poor widening at a rate previously unseen, we need radical policies to equalize the playing field in fundamental ways.

  • Focuses on collaborations with schools, families, and communities
  • Highlights tools and methods to aid in the creation of pathways, bridging initiatives into higher education
  • Includes case studies that show how students are supported during the transition into high education systems

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. List of Contributors
  6. Authors’ Biography
  7. Editors’ Biography
  8. Preface
    1. References
  9. Chapter 1. Policy and Practice Challenges and Opportunities for Developing Widening Participation in the Global South and North
    1. Abstract
    2. 1.1 Introduction
    3. 1.2 Raising Aspirations: Collaborations With Families, Schools, and Communities
    4. 1.3 Providing Opportunities: Pathways and Bridging Initiatives
    5. 1.4 Ensuring Success: Transition Support Through Policy
    6. 1.5 Concluding Remarks
    7. References
  10. Chapter 2. What Is Widening Participation and Why Does It Matter?
    1. Abstract
    2. 2.1 What Is “Widening Participation” in Higher Education?
    3. 2.2 Critical Considerations in Widening Participation
    4. 2.3 Best Practice in Widening Participation
    5. 2.4 Building Aspirations and Community Collaboration
    6. 2.5 Providing Opportunities and Alternative Pathways
    7. 2.6 Institutional Reform by Higher Education Providers
    8. 2.7 Conclusions
    9. References
  11. Chapter 3. Building Bridges: The Story Behind Australia’s Largest Widening Participation Collaboration
    1. Abstract
    2. 3.1 Development and Aims of Bridges to Higher Education
    3. 3.2 Pathways to Dreaming: Western Sydney University
    4. 3.3 U@Uni Summer School: University of Technology, Sydney
    5. 3.4 Leap–Robotics: Macquarie University
    6. 3.5 Compass: Film Production and Editing/Stop Motion Animation: University of Sydney
    7. 3.6 Meet the Professor: Australian Catholic University
    8. 3.7 Bridges: Future Directions
    9. References
  12. Chapter 4. Supporting Indigenous Students Through the University Journey: The Elder in Residence Program
    1. Abstract
    2. 4.1 Introduction
    3. 4.2 Gail’s Story
    4. 4.3 Elaine’s Story
    5. 4.4 Development of the Elder in Residence Role: Elaine’s Account
    6. 4.5 Student and Staff Perceptions of Elder in Residence Role and Value
    7. 4.6 Outcomes, Reflections, and Recommendations
    8. References
  13. Chapter 5. Creating Alternate Futures Through Higher Education: The Refugee Mentoring Program
    1. Abstract
    2. 5.1 Background
    3. 5.2 Addressing the Needs of Refugee Youth
    4. 5.3 The Case for Mentoring
    5. 5.4 Program Partners: The Schools Context
    6. 5.5 Development and Implementation of the Program
    7. 5.6 Impacts and Outcomes of the Program
    8. References
  14. Chapter 6. Widening Participation to Underrepresented and Disadvantaged Students: Social Identity and the Barriers to Higher Education Access in England
    1. Abstract
    2. 6.1 Introduction
    3. 6.2 The Widening Participation Research Evidence
    4. 6.3 The Widening Participation Policy Agenda: Past, Present, and Future Initiatives
    5. 6.4 Conclusion: Social Identity and Ways Forward for Widening Participation Initiatives
    6. References
  15. Chapter 7. Access of Disadvantaged Students to Higher Education in Chile: Current Scenarios and Challenges
    1. Abstract
    2. 7.1 Introduction
    3. 7.2 Background
    4. 7.3 Theoretical Framework
    5. 7.4 Methodology
    6. 7.5 Results
    7. 7.6 Conclusion
    8. References
  16. Chapter 8. Widening Participation in Higher Education: Preparatory Education Program for Students From Ethnic Minority Backgrounds
    1. Abstract
    2. 8.1 Evolving History of PEEM Programs
    3. 8.2 Three Tracks of PEEM Programs
    4. 8.3 Achievement of PEEM
    5. 8.4 Current Issues in PEEM
    6. 8.5 Conclusions and Implications
    7. References
  17. Chapter 9. Building a Foundation for Success? Foundation Programs in the Arab Gulf States Using Qatar as a Case Study
    1. Abstract
    2. 9.1 Introduction
    3. 9.2 Foundation Programs
    4. 9.3 Historical Background and Current Realities
    5. 9.4 Globalization and Nationalization in the Gulf
    6. 9.5 Qatar as a Case Study in Understanding Foundation Programs in the Gulf
    7. 9.6 Implications for Policymakers
    8. 9.7 Conclusion
    9. References
  18. Chapter 10. Generating Strategies for Success: Understanding the Lived Experiences of Native American Adult Learners
    1. Abstract
    2. 10.1 Introduction
    3. 10.2 Review of the Literature
    4. 10.3 Positionality
    5. 10.4 Research Methods
    6. 10.5 Findings
    7. 10.6 The Challenge of Participating in Class
    8. 10.7 The Importance of Relationships
    9. 10.8 Discussion
    10. References
  19. Chapter 11. Nepal’s Educated Nonelite: Reevaluating State-Provided Higher Education
    1. Abstract
    2. 11.1 Introduction
    3. 11.2 Public Higher Education Under Pressure
    4. 11.3 Bringing Nepal’s Educated Nonelite into the Conversation
    5. 11.4 Conclusion
    6. References
  20. Chapter 12. What Is Being Done? “Ubuntu” in Student Support Programs in Public Higher Education Institutions in South Africa
    1. Abstract
    2. 12.1 A Historical Introduction
    3. 12.2 Widening Participation in South Africa Today: A Snapshot
    4. 12.3 The Grand Narratives in South African Higher Education
    5. 12.4 Recognizing and Supporting FGS
    6. 12.5 Academic Development and Support Programs
    7. 12.6 Support Lessons From an AD Program for Largely FGS
    8. 12.7 Supplementary Academic Support
    9. 12.8 The Tutorial System
    10. 12.9 Academic Writing Support Initiatives
    11. 12.10 An Early Alert System Coupled With Multiple Student Support Measures
    12. 12.11 A Discipline-Based Approach
    13. 12.12 Discussion and Conclusions
    14. References
  21. Chapter 13. Tertiary Schooling Patterns and Disadvantaged Groups in Turkey
    1. Abstract
    2. 13.1 Introduction: Who are the Disadvantaged in Turkey?
    3. 13.2 Historical Perspective and Current Patterns of Access to Higher Education
    4. 13.3 Social, Demographic, and Economic Structures and Tertiary Enrollment
    5. 13.4 Public and Private Investment in Education
    6. 13.5 Cost and Financial Sources of Tertiary Education
    7. 13.6 Share of National Wealth Spent on Education
    8. 13.7 Tertiary Enrollment and Graduation
    9. 13.8 Transition to Work and Employment
    10. 13.9 Conclusions
    11. References
  22. Chapter 14. Understanding the Relative Value of Alternative Pathways in Postsecondary Education: Evidence From the State of Virginia
    1. Abstract
    2. 14.1 Introduction
    3. 14.2 Conceptual Framework and Relevant Literature
    4. 14.3 Data and Descriptive Statistics
    5. 14.4 Methodology
    6. 14.5 Results
    7. 14.6 Returns by Subject Area
    8. 14.7 Returns by Age
    9. 14.8 Discussion and Conclusion
    10. Acknowledgments
    11. References
    12. Appendix
  23. Index