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Branding Strategies for Success (Collection)

Book Description

3 breakthrough guides to building, revitalizing, and sustaining great brands — and profiting from them!

In three indispensable books, you’ll discover powerful new ways to build, rebuild, and sustain any brand — and leverage branding to supercharge profits and growth. In Six Rules for Brand Revitalization, Larry Light and Joan Kiddon teach the invaluable lessons of one of history’s most successful brand revitalizations: the reinvigoration of McDonald’s®. Drawing on that experience, the authors introduce a systematic blueprint for resurrecting any brand, and driving it to unprecedented success. Learn how to refocus your entire organization around common goals and a common brand promise...restore brand relevance based on profound knowledge of your customers... leverage innovation to reinvent your total brand experience… create a “plan to win,” and execute on it. The Truth About Creating Brands People Love reveals 51 bite-size, easy-to-use techniques for building great brands, and keeping them great. Learn powerful truths about positioning brands and developing brand meaning; using brands to drive corporate profits; managing advertising, pricing, and segmentation, and much more. Finally, What’s Your Story?: Storytelling to Move Markets, Audiences, People and Brands shows how to leverage the universal human activity of storytelling: your most powerful, most underutilized tool for competitive advantage. Legendary business thinkers Ryan Mathews and Watts Wacker help you take control of the stories your business tells, make them believable and unforgettable, make them move your customers to act!

From world-renowned leaders and experts, includingLarry Light, Joan Kiddon, Brian D. Till, Donna D. Heckler, Ryan Mathews, and Watts Wacker

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page
  2. Six Rules for Brand Revitalization: Learn How Companies Like McDonald’s Can Re-Energize Their Brands
    1. Copyright Page
    2. Dedication Page
    3. Praise for Six Rules for Brand Revitalization
    4. Contents
    5. Acknowledgments
    6. About the Authors
    7. Preface
    8. Introduction to the Rules and the Rules-Based Practices
    9. 1. Background to the Turnaround
      1. Big Brand in Big Trouble
      2. What Went Wrong?
      3. Ray Kroc’s Vision
      4. Chain of Supply
      5. The Opening Salvo
      6. What’s Going On?
      7. Our Leading Edge: Our Leaders
      8. The Plan to Win
      9. Brand Power
      10. Summary
    10. 2. The Six Rules of Revitalization
      1. Branding Is Not the Same As Advertising
      2. A Brand Versus a Product or Service
      3. The Six Rules
      4. Rule #1: Refocus the Organization
      5. Rule #2: Restore Brand Relevance
      6. Rule #3: Reinvent the Brand Experience
      7. Rule #4: Reinforce a Results Culture
      8. Rule #5: Rebuild Brand Trust
      9. Rule #6: Realize Global Alignment
    11. 3. Rule #1: Refocus the Organization
      1. Brand Purpose
      2. The McDonald’s Brand Purpose
      3. The Value Equation
      4. Financial Discipline
      5. Operational Excellence
      6. Leadership Marketing
      7. The Do’s and Don’ts of Refocusing the Organization
    12. 4. Rule #2: Restore Brand Relevance
      1. Thorough Knowledge of the Marketplace
      2. Understanding the Market Segmentation
      3. Needs-Based Segmentation Profiles
      4. Prioritizing the Markets
      5. Synthesis Versus Analysis
      6. Prioritize, Prioritize
      7. Leadership Marketing
      8. McDonald’s Segmentation
      9. What Is the Brand Promise?
      10. Brand Pyramid
      11. Brand Essence
      12. Paradox Promise
      13. McDonald’s Paradox Promise
      14. The Do’s and Don’ts of Restoring Relevance
    13. 5. Rule #3: Reinvent the Brand Experience
      1. People
      2. Product
      3. Place
      4. Price
      5. Promotion
      6. Conclusion
      7. The Do’s and Don’ts of Reinventing the Brand Experience
    14. 6. Rule #4: Reinforce a Results Culture
      1. All Growth Is Not Equally Valuable
      2. Balanced Brand-Business Scorecard
      3. The Do’s and Don’ts of Creating a Results Culture
    15. 7. Rule #5: Rebuild Brand Trust
      1. Crisis of Credibility
      2. Five Principles of Trust Building
      3. You Are What You Do
      4. Lead the Debate; Don’t Hide from It
      5. The Arrow Is Aimed at Fast Food
      6. Openness Is an Opportunity
      7. Trusted Messages Must Come from a Trustworthy Source
      8. Good Citizenship Pays
      9. The Do’s and Don’ts of Rebuilding Trust
    16. 8. Rule #6: Realize Global Alignment
      1. Alignment
      2. Freedom Within a Framework
      3. Internal Marketing Is a Must
      4. The Do’s and Don’ts of Realizing Global Alignment
    17. 9. Realizing Global Alignment: Creating a Plan to Win
      1. The Three Sections of the Plan to Win
      2. KIDDO Garden Foods
      3. Step One: Brand Direction—Articulating the Brand Purpose and Brand Promise
      4. Step Two: Creating the Five Action Ps
      5. Step Three: Performance Measures
      6. Implications of a Plan to Win
      7. The Do’s and Don’ts of Creating a Plan to Win
    18. 10. Do the Six Rules of Revitalization Work?
      1. Moving Forward
      2. Summary: Brand Revitalization
    19. Index
  3. The Truth About: Creating Brands People Love
    1. Copyright Page
    2. Dedication Page
    3. Praise for The Truth About Creating Brands People Love
    4. Contents
    5. Preface
    6. Truth 1. Managing brands is not common sense
    7. Truth 2. No one loves your brand as much as you love it
    8. Truth 3. The brand is not owned by marketing; everyone owns it
    9. Truth 4. Making more by doing less
    10. Truth 5. Does your brand keep its promise?
    11. Truth 6. Price is the communication of the value of your brand
    12. Truth 7. Brand personality is the emotional connection with your brand
    13. Truth 8. Does your sales force know the difference between a product and a brand?
    14. Truth 9. Beware of the discounting minefield
    15. Truth 10. Packaging protects your product; great packaging protects your brand
    16. Truth 11. Brand management is association management
    17. Truth 12. The retail experience is the brand experience
    18. Truth 13. Corporate ego: Danger ahead
    19. Truth 14. Brand metrics: Best measure of success?
    20. Truth 15. Customer complaints are a treasure
    21. Truth 16. Brand stewardship begins at home
    22. Truth 17. Market share doesn't matter
    23. Truth 18. Avoid the most common segmentation mistake
    24. Truth 19. Public relations and damage control: The defining moment
    25. Truth 20. Focus equals simplicity
    26. Truth 21. Marketing is courtship, not combat
    27. Truth 22. Don't sacrifice brand focus for sales
    28. Truth 23. The medium is not the message; the message is the message
    29. Truth 24. Brand development and the small business
    30. Truth 25. Imitation is an ineffective form of flattery
    31. Truth 26. Positioning lives in the mind of your target customer
    32. Truth 27. The value of brand loyalty
    33. Truth 28. Quality is not an effective branding message
    34. Truth 29. Effective use of celebrity endorsers: The fit's the thing
    35. Truth 30. Brand-building consumer promotion
    36. Truth 31. Advertising built for the long run
    37. Truth 32. A service brand is a personal brand
    38. Truth 33. Is your brand the best at something? If so, be satisfied
    39. Truth 34. Great positionings are enduring
    40. Truth 35. Effective branding begins with the name
    41. Truth 36. Your brand makes your company powerful, not the other way around
    42. Truth 37. Be consistent but not complacent
    43. Truth 38. Is your brand different? If not, why will someone buy it?
    44. Truth 39. The three M's of taglines: Meaningful, motivating, and memorable
    45. Truth 40. Customer service is the touch point of your brand
    46. Truth 41. Smaller targets are easier to hit
    47. Truth 42. Beware of the allure of brand extensions
    48. Truth 43. Keep advertising simple, but not simplistic
    49. Truth 44. It's a long walk from the focus group room to the cash register
    50. Truth 45. Repositioning can be a fool's chase
    51. Truth 46. With advertising, don't expect too much
    52. Truth 47. Don't let testing override judgment
    53. Truth 48. Effective advertising is 90% what you say, 10% how you say it
    54. Truth 49. Compromise can destroy a brand
    55. Truth 50. Don't let the pizazz outshine the brand
    56. Truth 51. There are no commodity products, only commodity thinking
    57. References
      1. Truth 3
      2. Truth 4
      3. Truth 5
      4. Truth 6
      5. Truth 7
      6. Truth 11
      7. Truth 16
      8. Truth 17
      9. Truth 20
      10. Truth 22
      11. Truth 25
      12. Truth 26
      13. Truth 27
      14. Truth 29
      15. Truth 31
      16. Truth 35
      17. Truth 36
      18. Truth 38
      19. Truth 42
      20. Truth 43
      21. Truth 44
      22. Truth 46
      23. Truth 49
    58. Acknowledgments
    59. About the Authors
    60. Financial Times Press
  4. What’s Your Story?: Storytelling to Move Markets, Audiences, People, and Brands
    1. Copyright Page
    2. Dedication Page
    3. Praise for What's Your Story?
    4. Financial Times Press
    5. Contents
    6. Acknowledgments
    7. About the Authors
    8. Introduction
    9. Chapter 1. The Story of Stories
      1. Beyond the Business Case
      2. Storytelling and Business
      3. Why Stories?
      4. The Myth of Business and the Business of Myth
      5. Don't Blame Us; Blame Plato
    10. Chapter 2. Truth Stories Versus True Stories
      1. Enron: Frankenstein and Jesus—Two Ways of Telling the Same Story
      2. The Use of Story as Positioning Statement
      3. The Mad Scientist in the Laundry Room
      4. Paris Hilton, Jack Kerouac, Jason and Achilles
    11. Chapter 3. The 10 Functions of Storytelling
      1. 1. Explain Origins
      2. 2. Define Individual and Group Identity
      3. 3. Communicate Tradition and Delineate Taboo
      4. 4. Simplify and Provide Perspective; Reduce Complex Problems to a Series of Easily Digested Principles
      5. 5. Illustrate the Natural Order of Things
      6. 6. Concisely Communicate Complex History
      7. 7. Communicate Moral and Ethical Positions and the Transference and Preservation of Values
      8. 8. Illustrate Relationships to, and with, Authority
      9. 9. Describe Appropriate Responses to Life or Model Behaviors
      10. 10. Define Reward and Detail the Paths to Salvation and Damnation
    12. Chapter 4. The Abolition of Context
      1. It Was a Dark and Stormy Night (or Was It?)
      2. Common Understandings, Uncommon Stories
      3. Fictional Contexts Versus the Real World
      4. The Abolition of Context
    13. Chapter 5. Who Owns Your Brand?
      1. You Have to Let Go to Hold On
      2. The Uncooperative Co-Conspirators
      3. The Little Bo Peeps Have Lost Their Sheep
      4. Something's Rotten in Digiville (and Everywhere Else)
      5. Truth Versus True: Round Two
      6. "It Floats!"
      7. Who Am I? Who We Are
      8. A Hundred Thousand Commandments
      9. Let Me Tell You Where You Stand
      10. Letting the Audience Tell the Story
      11. Can't You Hear That Whistle Blowing?
      12. What's It All About?
      13. What's in It for Me?
    14. Chapter 6. Five Critical Story Themes
      1. In the Beginning, There Were the Plots
      2. Do We Hear More Than One?
      3. The Hero's Quest
      4. Creation Stories
      5. Stories of Transformation
      6. Myths of the Fall and Redemption
      7. The Myth of the Crossroads
    15. Chapter 7. Five Stages of Business Evolution
      1. The Entrepreneurial Vision
      2. The Establishment of the Enterprise
      3. The Corporate Coming of Age
      4. The Crisis Phase
      5. The Transition Phase
    16. Chapter 8. Applied Storytelling 101: Industries
      1. The Aerospace Industry: A Case Study
      2. Beyond the Final Frontier
      3. Guidelines for Storytellers
    17. Chapter 9. Applied Storytelling 101: The Corporation
      1. The Microsoft Story
      2. A Cola Ain't a Cola, Ain't a Cola
      3. A Tale of Two Tales
      4. Value and Values
      5. Choosing the Right Corporate Story
    18. Chapter 10. Applied Storytelling 101: The Brand
      1. A Modest Proposal on the Topic of Brands
      2. The Metaverse and Beyond
      3. What Is a Brand?
      4. IBM
      5. Disney
      6. SLAM!
      7. Tools for Storytelling Brand Builders
    19. Chapter 11. Applied Storytelling 101: The Individual
      1. So, Why Tell the Story in the First Place?
    20. Chapter 12. The Storyteller's Toolbox
      1. Back to Basics
      2. The Death of Zeus, Inc.: A Case Study in How to Lose a Cosmic Monopoly
      3. Tell Me Why (and Who and How and What It All Means)
      4. Sitting Around the Digital Campfire
      5. Take a Cue from Social Science
      6. Four Variations on a Theme
    21. Epilogue: A New Story for a New Century
      1. The Saga of Primus Loch
    22. Endnotes
      1. Chapter 1
      2. Chapter 4
      3. Chapter 5
      4. Chapter 6
      5. Chapter 7
      6. Chapter 8
      7. Chapter 9
      8. Chapter 10
      9. Chapter 11
      10. Chapter 12
    23. Index
    24. Prologue: A Whole New World
      1. The Age of Empowerment
      2. The Age of Knowledge
      3. The Age of Transcendence
      4. Endnotes
  5. Do You Matter?: How Great Design Will Make People Love Your Company
    1. Copyright Page
    2. Praise for Do you matter?
    3. Contents
    4. About the Authors
    5. Dedication
    6. Acknowledgments
    7. 1. Design Matters
      1. Design or Die
    8. 2. Do You Matter?
      1. Why?
    9. 3. How To Matter
    10. 4. Being Design Driven
      1. Positive Examples of Design-Driven Companies
      2. Some Not So Positive Examples
      3. Implementation
      4. How Do You Know How Your Customers Feel?
      5. Cost Factors
      6. The Human Factor
    11. 5. Your Brand Is Not Your Logo
      1. The Living Nature of a Brand
      2. Your Brand Communicates
      3. Your Brand Is About Value
      4. How To Really Be Cool, Not Just Act Cool
      5. Your Brand Should Be As Alive As a Person
      6. Once There, a Brand's Success Is Yours to Lose
      7. How Do You Know How You're Doing in Respect to Customer Experience?
    12. 6. Products As Portals
      1. Starting with Experience, Hopefully Ending with It
      2. Being the Customer
      3. How Do You Do This?
      4. Portals to Experience
      5. This All Sounds Good, But One More Time, How Do I Go About Doing It?
      6. You Can Do It, We Can't Help
      7. What the W? A Hotel As Suite As They Come!
    13. 7. Your Products and Services Are Talking to People
      1. What Is Design Language?
      2. Speaking in Tongues
      3. Getting to Your Own Design Language and Strategy
    14. 8. Building a Design-Driven Culture
      1. Focus
      2. Long-Term
      3. Authentic
      4. Vigilant
      5. Original
      6. Repeatable
    15. 9. Go Forth and Matter
      1. 1. Design matters
      2. 2. Design is a process, not an event
      3. 3. If it was easy, everybody would do it
    16. Endnotes
      1. Chapter 3
      2. Chapter 4
      3. Chapter 5
      4. Chapter 6
      5. Chapter 7
      6. Chapter 8
    17. Index