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Boost your memory by Darren Bridger

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21

State-dependent memory

Emotions and memory are closely linked. Your emotional state of mind at the time you learn information can affect how easily you recall that information later.

When we learn something, we are also storing information about the time, place and our emotional state. These can then act as cues or triggers that help us remember.

Emotions can heighten our memories. As an extreme example, soldiers who experience an horrific incident during war often can recall it in great detail and, whenever they experience similar things, can have vivid ‘flashbacks’ of the incident. Two things are happening here. Firstly, our brains are naturally biased towards remembering highly emotional events (as these are typically more significant ...

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