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Beyond Transfer of Training: Engaging Systems to Improve Performance

Book Description

Did you know that an average of only 10%-20% of training resulted in changing or enhancing an employee?s performance on the job. So, why train? Picking up where her first book, the landmark Transfer of Training, left off (and retaining some of the most salient sections and strategies), this completely updated take on the topic shows trainers and performance professionals how to:

  • Gain and maintain effective performance in complex systems.

  • Find and engage clients and stakeholders in transfer of learning efforts.

  • Support transfer of learning in E-environments.

  • Evaluate the success transfer of learning interventions.

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Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Preface
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. 1. Establishing the Foundation for Performance Improvement in Complex Systems
    1. 1. Organizations as Complex Systems
      1. 1.1. Living and Working in Complex Systems
        1. 1.1.1. Complexity
          1. 1.1.1.1. Systems
        2. 1.1.2. Multiple Systems
          1. 1.1.2.1. Stakeholders in Organizational Systems
        3. 1.1.3. No "Simple" Systems
      2. 1.2. Moderately Complex Systems
        1. 1.2.1. Diagram of a Moderately Complex System
        2. 1.2.2. "ABC" Railroad: A Moderately Complex System
      3. 1.3. Highly Complex Systems
        1. 1.3.1. The Georgia Mental Health Training Project
        2. 1.3.2. The Ontario Long Term Care Institute
        3. 1.3.3. Other Highly Complex Systems
      4. 1.4. Summary of This Chapter
      5. 1.5. Suggestions for Further Reading
    2. 2. Stakeholders and Support for Performance
      1. 2.1. Performance and Performers
        1. 2.1.1. Performance
        2. 2.1.2. Performers
      2. 2.2. Stakeholders in Performance
        1. 2.2.1. Stakeholders Who Support Performance
        2. 2.2.2. Supporting and Opposing Stakeholders
        3. 2.2.3. Examples of Stakeholders in Moderately Complex Systems
        4. 2.2.4. Examples of Stakeholders in Highly Complex Systems
      3. 2.3. Organizational Factors That Support Performance in Complex Systems
        1. 2.3.1. Factors Supporting Performance That Is Supervised
        2. 2.3.2. Factors Supporting Performance That Is Relatively Autonomous
      4. 2.4. Summary of This Chapter
      5. 2.5. Suggestions for Further Reading
    3. 3. The Performance Consultant
      1. 3.1. The Role of the Performance Consultant
        1. 3.1.1. The Performance Consultant's Expertise
      2. 3.2. The Human Performance Technology (HPT) Process
        1. 3.2.1. Overview of Human Performance Technology
        2. 3.2.2. The HPT Process
        3. 3.2.3. HPT in Complex Systems
        4. 3.2.4. HPT Expertise for Performance Consultants
        5. 3.2.5. HPT Knowledge and Abilities for Managers and Performers
      3. 3.3. Organizations as Complex Systems
        1. 3.3.1. Expertise in Complex Systems for Performance Consultants
        2. 3.3.2. Knowledge and Abilities in Organizations as Complex Systems for Managers, Performers, and Other Stakeholders
      4. 3.4. Partnering and Consulting with Other Stakeholders
        1. 3.4.1. Partnering and Consulting Expertise for Performance Consultants
        2. 3.4.2. Knowledge and Abilities in Partnering and Consulting with Managers, Performers, and Other Stakeholders)
      5. 3.5. Summary of This Chapter
      6. 3.6. Suggestions for Further Reading
  5. 3. Tools For Stakeholders to Improve Performance
    1. 4. Developing Stakeholder Strategies to Improve Performance
      1. 4.1. Low Performance Levels Following Training Interventions
        1. 4.1.1. Research on Lack of Transfer of Training to Performance
        2. 4.1.2. Need to Involve Stakeholders
        3. 4.1.3. New Definition of Transfer of Learning to Performance
      2. 4.2. Stakeholder Support for Performance
        1. 4.2.1. Stakeholder Support for Performance Following Learning Interventions
        2. 4.2.2. Support for Performance Following Other Nonlearning Interventions
      3. 4.3. Recommended Stakeholder Strategies to Support Performance
        1. 4.3.1. The Transfer Matrix, a Tool for Managing Stakeholder Transfer Strategies
        2. 4.3.2. Transfer Matrix of Re search-Based Strategies
        3. 4.3.3. Example of a Transfer Matrix
      4. 4.4. Summary of This Chapter
      5. 4.5. Suggestions for Further Reading
    2. 5. Evaluation to Measure and Support Performance
      1. 5.1. Evaluation as a Tool to Measure and Support Performance
        1. 5.1.1. Increased Focus on Both Measurement and Support
        2. 5.1.2. Why Evaluation Is Important for Learning and Performance
      2. 5.2. Levels of Evaluation of Training Interventions
        1. 5.2.1. Limitations of Kirkpatrick's Four-Level Framework
        2. 5.2.2. Level 1 Evaluation
          1. 5.2.2.1. Learners' Level of Confidence in Applying New Skills
          2. 5.2.2.2. Learners' Action Plans for Applying New Learning on the Job
          3. 5.2.2.3. Learners' Perceptions of Potential Barriers in the Workplace
          4. 5.2.2.4. Learner Reports on Stakeholder Support Strategies Be fore and During the Program
        3. 5.2.3. Level 2 Evaluations
        4. 5.2.4. Level 3 Evaluations
          1. 5.2.4.1. Extent of Accomplishment of Action Plans
          2. 5.2.4.2. Actual Workplace Barriers That Interfere with Performance on the Job
          3. 5.2.4.3. Strategies by Other Stakeholders to Support Performance on the Job
        5. 5.2.5. Level 4 Evaluations
        6. 5.2.6. Level 5 Evaluations
      3. 5.3. The Role of Evaluators in Supporting Learning and Performance
      4. 5.4. Summary of This Chapter
      5. 5.5. Suggestions for Further Reading
    3. 6. Partnering and Consulting with Managers
      1. 6.1. Establishing Partnering Relationships with Managers
        1. 6.1.1. Steps to Partner with Managers to Improve Performance
      2. 6.2. Consulting with Managers on a Performance Improvement Intervention
      3. 6.3. Supporting the Performance of Stakeholders in Performance Improvement Interventions
      4. 6.4. Summary of This Chapter
      5. 6.5. Suggestions for Further Reading
  6. 5. Applications of Performance Improvement in Real-World Systems
    1. 7. Sleuthing Out Performance Consulting's Best Partners
      1. 7.1. The Call for Performance Consultants' Best Stakeholders
      2. 7.2. Lessons Learned from the Performance Consulting/S&H Partnership
        1. 7.2.1. Key Shared Values
        2. 7.2.2. Parallel History and Evolution
        3. 7.2.3. Mutually Beneficial Specialized Knowledge, Skill, and Ability (KSA)
        4. 7.2.4. Mutually Validating KSAs
      3. 7.3. The Canadian National Railway U.S. Operation's Safety Rule Book Revision Process
      4. 7.4. Summary of This Chapter
      5. 7.5. Suggestions for Further Reading
    2. 8. Implementing Transfer of Learning to Performance in a Complex International System
      1. 8.1. An International Complex System
      2. 8.2. Moving from Training to Performance Improvement
        1. 8.2.1. In the Beginning There Was Training
        2. 8.2.2. JHPIEGO's Performance Improvement Process
      3. 8.3. Transfer of Learning to Performance
        1. 8.3.1. Why Focus on Transfer of Learning to Performance?
        2. 8.3.2. What Is the Process for Transfer to Performance?
        3. 8.3.3. What Is the Matrix for Transfer to Performance?
        4. 8.3.4. What are Other Actions to Improve Transfer to Performance?
        5. 8.3.5. What Is an Action Plan?
      4. 8.4. The Case of Improved Infection Prevention Practices
      5. 8.5. Summary and Lessons Learned
      6. 8.6. Suggestions for Further Reading
    3. 9. e-Learning and Support for Performance
      1. 9.1. What Constitutes e-Learning
        1. 9.1.1. What e-Learning Is
        2. 9.1.2. What Is Not e-Learning
      2. 9.2. Current e-Learning State of the Art
        1. 9.2.1. e-Learning Investments and Use
        2. 9.2.2. e-Learning Within a Workplace Context
        3. 9.2.3. e-Learning as Just-in-Time Work and Performance Support
        4. 9.2.4. e-Learning as Community of Practice
        5. 9.2.5. Design Elements for e-Learning
      3. 9.3. e-Learning Enablers and Disablers
        1. 9.3.1. Enablers of e-Learning
          1. 9.3.1.1. Employee-Centered Learning Independent of Time or Place
          2. 9.3.1.2. Upgraded e-Learning Through Technological Advances
          3. 9.3.1.3. Centralized updates, Assessment, Feedback, and Record-Keeping
          4. 9.3.1.4. Relatively Plat form-Independent Delivery Through Uniform Standards
          5. 9.3.1.5. Work force Currency Maintained
        2. 9.3.2. Disablers of e-Learning
          1. 9.3.2.1. Investment Required in e-Learning Structure and Methods
          2. 9.3.2.2. Myopic Management Decisions
          3. 9.3.2.3. Redefinitions Required for Reliable Information and Evaluation
          4. 9.3.2.4. Cross-Functional Team Required to Design, Develop, and Deploy
      4. 9.4. Stakeholder Support for Transfer of e-Learning to Performance
      5. 9.5. Summary of This Chapter
      6. 9.6. Suggestions for Further Reading
  7. Glossary
  8. REFERENCES
  9. ABOUT THE AUTHORS