You are previewing Beginning XML, 5th Edition.

Beginning XML, 5th Edition

Cover of Beginning XML, 5th Edition by Danny Ayers... Published by Wrox
  1. Cover
  2. Contents
  3. Part I: Introducing XML
    1. Chapter 1: What is XML?
      1. Steps Leading up to XML: Data Representation and Markups
      2. The Birth of XML
      3. More Advantages of XML
      4. XML in Practice
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 2: Well-Formed XML
      1. What Does Well-Formed Mean?
      2. Creating XML in a Text Editor
      3. Advanced XML Parsing
      4. The XML Infoset
      5. Summary
    3. Chapter 3: XML Namespaces
      1. Defining Namespaces
      2. Why Do You Need Namespaces?
      3. How Do You Choose a Namespace?
      4. How to Declare a Namespace
      5. Namespace Usage in the Real World
      6. When to Use and Not Use Namespaces
      7. Common Namespaces
      8. Summary
  4. Part II: Validation
    1. Chapter 4: Document Type Definitions
      1. What Are Document Type Definitions?
      2. Anatomy of a DTD
      3. DTD Limitations
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 5: XML Schemas
      1. Benefits of XML Schemas
      2. XML Schemas in Practice
      3. Defining XML Schemas
      4. Creating a Schema from Multiple Documents
      5. Documenting XML Schemas
      6. XML Schema 1.1
      7. Summary
    3. Chapter 6: Relax NG and Schematron
      1. Why Do You Need More Ways of Validating XML?
      2. Setting Up Your Environment
      3. Using RELAX NG
      4. Using Schematron
      5. Summary
  5. Part III: Processing
    1. Chapter 7: Extracting Data From XML
      1. Document Models: Representing XML in Memory
      2. The XPath Language
      3. Summary
    2. Chapter 8: XSLT
      1. What XSLT Is Used For
      2. Setting Up Your XSLT Development Environment
      3. Foundational XSLT Elements
      4. Reusing Code in XSLT
      5. Understanding Built-In Templates and Built-In Rules
      6. Using XSLT 2.0
      7. XSLT and XPath 3.0: What’s Coming Next?
      8. Summary
  6. Part IV: Databases
    1. Chapter 9: XQUERY
      1. XQuery, XPath, and XSLT
      2. XQuery in Practice
      3. Building Blocks of XQuery
      4. The Anatomy of a Query Expression
      5. Some Optional XQuery Features
      6. Coming in XQuery 3.0
      7. Summary
    2. Chapter 10: XML and Databases
      1. Understanding Why Databases Need to Handle XML
      2. Analyzing which XML Features are Needed in a Database
      3. Using MySQL with XML
      4. Using SQL Server with XML
      5. Using eXist with XML
      6. Summary
  7. Part V: Programming
    1. Chapter 11: Event-Driven Programming
      1. Understanding Sequential Processing
      2. Using SAX in Sequential Processing
      3. Using XmlReader
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 12: LINQ to XML
      1. What Is LINQ?
      2. Creating Documents
      3. Extracting Data from an XML Document
      4. Modifying Documents
      5. Transforming Documents
      6. Using VB.NET XML Features
      7. Summary
  8. Part VI: Communication
    1. Chapter 13: RSS, ATOM, and Content Syndication
      1. Syndication
      2. Working with News Feeds
      3. A Simple Aggregator
      4. Transforming RSS with XSLT
      5. Useful Resources
      6. Summary
    2. Chapter 14: WEB Services
      1. What Is an RPC?
      2. RPC Protocols
      3. The New RPC Protocol: Web Services
      4. The Web Services Stack
      5. Summary
    3. Chapter 15: SOAP and WSDL
      1. Laying the Groundwork
      2. The New RPC Protocol: SOAP
      3. Defining Web Services: WSDL
      4. Summary
    4. Chapter 16: AJAX
      1. AJAX Overview
      2. Introduction to JavaScript
      3. The XMLHttpRequest Function
      4. Using HTTP Methods with AJAX
      5. Accessibility Considerations
      6. The jQuery Library
      7. JSON and AJAX
      8. The Web Sever Back End
      9. A Larger Example
      10. Summary
  9. Part VII: Display
    1. Chapter 17: XHTML and HTML 5
      1. Background of SGML
      2. The Open Web Platform
      3. Introduction to XHTML
      4. XHTML and HTML: Problems and Workarounds
      5. Cascading Style Sheets (CSS)
      6. Unobtrusive JavaScript
      7. HTML 5
      8. Summary
    2. Chapter 18: Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG)
      1. Scalable Vector Graphics and Bitmaps
      2. The SVG Graphics Model
      3. SVG and CSS
      4. SVG Tools
      5. SVG Basic Built-in Shapes
      6. SVG Transforms and Groups
      7. SVG Definitions and Metadata
      8. Viewports and Coordinates
      9. SVG Colors and Gradients
      10. Including Bitmap Images in SVG
      11. SVG Text and Fonts
      12. SVG Animation Four Ways
      13. SVG and HTML 5
      14. SVG and Web Apps
      15. Making SVG with XQuery or XSLT
      16. Resources
      17. Summary
  10. Part VIII: Case Study
    1. Chapter 19: Case Study: XML in Publishing
      1. Background
      2. Project Introduction: Current Workflow
      3. Introducing a New XML-Based Workflow
      4. Creating a New Process
      5. Some Technical Aspects
      6. The Hoy Books Website
      7. Summary
  11. Appendix A: Answers to Exercises
  12. Appendix B: XPath Functions
  13. Appendix C: XML Schema Data Types
  14. Introduction
  15. Advertisements
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INTRODUCTION

THIS IS THE FIFTH EDITION OF A BOOK that has proven popular with professional developers and academic institutions. It strives to impart knowledge on a subject that at first was seen by some as just another fad, but that instead has come to maturity and is now often just taken for granted. Almost six years have passed since the previous edition — a veritable lifetime in IT terms. In reviewing the fourth edition for what should be kept, what should be updated, and what new material was needed, the current authors found that about three-quarters of the material was substantially out of date. XML has far more uses than five years ago, and there is also much more reliance on it under the covers. It is now no longer essential to be able to handcraft esoteric configuration files to get a web service up and running. It has also been found that, in some places, XML is not always the best fit. These situations and others, along with a complete overhaul of the content, form the basis for this newer version.

So, what is XML? XML stands for eXtensible Markup Language, which is a language that can be used to describe data in a meaningful way. Virtually anywhere there is a need to store data, especially where it may need to be consumed by more than one application, XML is a good place to start. It has gained a reputation for being a candidate where interoperability is important, either between two applications in different businesses or simply those within a company. Hundreds of ...

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