You are previewing Beginning XML, 5th Edition.

Beginning XML, 5th Edition

Cover of Beginning XML, 5th Edition by Danny Ayers... Published by Wrox
  1. Cover
  2. Contents
  3. Part I: Introducing XML
    1. Chapter 1: What is XML?
      1. Steps Leading up to XML: Data Representation and Markups
      2. The Birth of XML
      3. More Advantages of XML
      4. XML in Practice
      5. Summary
    2. Chapter 2: Well-Formed XML
      1. What Does Well-Formed Mean?
      2. Creating XML in a Text Editor
      3. Advanced XML Parsing
      4. The XML Infoset
      5. Summary
    3. Chapter 3: XML Namespaces
      1. Defining Namespaces
      2. Why Do You Need Namespaces?
      3. How Do You Choose a Namespace?
      4. How to Declare a Namespace
      5. Namespace Usage in the Real World
      6. When to Use and Not Use Namespaces
      7. Common Namespaces
      8. Summary
  4. Part II: Validation
    1. Chapter 4: Document Type Definitions
      1. What Are Document Type Definitions?
      2. Anatomy of a DTD
      3. DTD Limitations
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 5: XML Schemas
      1. Benefits of XML Schemas
      2. XML Schemas in Practice
      3. Defining XML Schemas
      4. Creating a Schema from Multiple Documents
      5. Documenting XML Schemas
      6. XML Schema 1.1
      7. Summary
    3. Chapter 6: Relax NG and Schematron
      1. Why Do You Need More Ways of Validating XML?
      2. Setting Up Your Environment
      3. Using RELAX NG
      4. Using Schematron
      5. Summary
  5. Part III: Processing
    1. Chapter 7: Extracting Data From XML
      1. Document Models: Representing XML in Memory
      2. The XPath Language
      3. Summary
    2. Chapter 8: XSLT
      1. What XSLT Is Used For
      2. Setting Up Your XSLT Development Environment
      3. Foundational XSLT Elements
      4. Reusing Code in XSLT
      5. Understanding Built-In Templates and Built-In Rules
      6. Using XSLT 2.0
      7. XSLT and XPath 3.0: What’s Coming Next?
      8. Summary
  6. Part IV: Databases
    1. Chapter 9: XQUERY
      1. XQuery, XPath, and XSLT
      2. XQuery in Practice
      3. Building Blocks of XQuery
      4. The Anatomy of a Query Expression
      5. Some Optional XQuery Features
      6. Coming in XQuery 3.0
      7. Summary
    2. Chapter 10: XML and Databases
      1. Understanding Why Databases Need to Handle XML
      2. Analyzing which XML Features are Needed in a Database
      3. Using MySQL with XML
      4. Using SQL Server with XML
      5. Using eXist with XML
      6. Summary
  7. Part V: Programming
    1. Chapter 11: Event-Driven Programming
      1. Understanding Sequential Processing
      2. Using SAX in Sequential Processing
      3. Using XmlReader
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 12: LINQ to XML
      1. What Is LINQ?
      2. Creating Documents
      3. Extracting Data from an XML Document
      4. Modifying Documents
      5. Transforming Documents
      6. Using VB.NET XML Features
      7. Summary
  8. Part VI: Communication
    1. Chapter 13: RSS, ATOM, and Content Syndication
      1. Syndication
      2. Working with News Feeds
      3. A Simple Aggregator
      4. Transforming RSS with XSLT
      5. Useful Resources
      6. Summary
    2. Chapter 14: WEB Services
      1. What Is an RPC?
      2. RPC Protocols
      3. The New RPC Protocol: Web Services
      4. The Web Services Stack
      5. Summary
    3. Chapter 15: SOAP and WSDL
      1. Laying the Groundwork
      2. The New RPC Protocol: SOAP
      3. Defining Web Services: WSDL
      4. Summary
    4. Chapter 16: AJAX
      1. AJAX Overview
      2. Introduction to JavaScript
      3. The XMLHttpRequest Function
      4. Using HTTP Methods with AJAX
      5. Accessibility Considerations
      6. The jQuery Library
      7. JSON and AJAX
      8. The Web Sever Back End
      9. A Larger Example
      10. Summary
  9. Part VII: Display
    1. Chapter 17: XHTML and HTML 5
      1. Background of SGML
      2. The Open Web Platform
      3. Introduction to XHTML
      4. XHTML and HTML: Problems and Workarounds
      5. Cascading Style Sheets (CSS)
      6. Unobtrusive JavaScript
      7. HTML 5
      8. Summary
    2. Chapter 18: Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG)
      1. Scalable Vector Graphics and Bitmaps
      2. The SVG Graphics Model
      3. SVG and CSS
      4. SVG Tools
      5. SVG Basic Built-in Shapes
      6. SVG Transforms and Groups
      7. SVG Definitions and Metadata
      8. Viewports and Coordinates
      9. SVG Colors and Gradients
      10. Including Bitmap Images in SVG
      11. SVG Text and Fonts
      12. SVG Animation Four Ways
      13. SVG and HTML 5
      14. SVG and Web Apps
      15. Making SVG with XQuery or XSLT
      16. Resources
      17. Summary
  10. Part VIII: Case Study
    1. Chapter 19: Case Study: XML in Publishing
      1. Background
      2. Project Introduction: Current Workflow
      3. Introducing a New XML-Based Workflow
      4. Creating a New Process
      5. Some Technical Aspects
      6. The Hoy Books Website
      7. Summary
  11. Appendix A: Answers to Exercises
  12. Appendix B: XPath Functions
  13. Appendix C: XML Schema Data Types
  14. Introduction
  15. Advertisements
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Chapter 2

Well-Formed XML

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN IN THIS CHAPTER:

  • The meaning of well-formed XML
  • The constituent parts of an XML document
  • How these parts are put together

So far you’ve looked at the history before XML, why it came about, and some of its advantages and disadvantages. You’ve also taken a whirlwind tour of some of the technologies associated with XML that are featured in this book.

In this chapter you’ll be examining the rules that apply to a document that decide whether or not it is XML. This knowledge is needed in two main situations: first, when you’re designing an XML format for your own data so that you can be sure that any standard XML parser can handle your document; second, when you are designing a system that will accept XML input from an external source so you’ll be sure that the data you receive is legitimate XML. There are, unfortunately, a number of systems that purport to export data as XML but break some of the rules, meaning that unless you can get the problem fixed at source, you have to resort to handling the input using non-XML tools. This makes for a lot of unnecessary development and defeats the object of having a universally recognized method of data representation.

Additionally, you’ll take a look at the basic and more advanced building blocks of XML starting with the most common, elements and attributes, and see how these are used to construct a complete document. You’ll also be introduced to the modern terminology that describes these constituent ...

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