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Basic TV Reporting, 2nd Edition

Book Description

Basic TV Reporting is a practical, easy to read guide to the skills needed to become a successful television reporter - arguably the most demanding and glamorous job in journalism. The book describes the role in detail, how reporters fit into the editorial team and where their duties begin and end.


Basic TV Reporting is a practical, easy to read guide to the skills needed to become a successful television reporter - arguably the most demanding and glamorous job in journalism. The book describes the role in detail, how reporters fit into the editorial team and where their duties begin and end.

The late Ivor Yorke has enjoyed a wealth of experience to pass on to aspiring broadcast journalists, having spent more than 20 years as a writer, reporter, producer and editor, before becoming Head of Journalist Training, BBC News and Current Affairs. He was also a freelance training consultant. He is the author of Television News (now in its third edition) and co-author with the late Bernard Hesketh of An Introduction to ENG, also published by Focal Press.

Reviews:

`This is a short, well-constructed book which is of as much value to the interviewed as to the interviewer. It is practical and down-to-earth (`keep off the gin, and stick to the tonic') and delightfully easy to read.'
British Journal of Educational Technology.

' Easy to read guide to the skills needed to become a successful TV
reporter.'
Voice of the Listener

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright Page
  5. Table of Contents
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Introduction
  8. SO YOU WANT TO BE ON TELEVISION
    1. WHAT A REPORTER DOES
      1. Origins of television journalism
      2. Reporting responsibilities
    2. A PLACE ON THE TAXI RANK
      1. The predictability of news
      2. In the field
      3. Editing your report
    3. WHAT MAKES A GOOD REPORTER
      1. Persistence … and sensitivity
      2. A love of language
      3. An eye for illustration
    4. THE REPORTER AS MANAGER
      1. Reporter-camera operator relationship
      2. Meeting deadlines
    5. THINKING ABOUT NEWS
      1. Opening ‘The Gate’
      2. Differences in news values
  9. THE NEWS MACHINE
    1. PLANNING FUTURE COVERAGE
      1. Foreign news
    2. ASSIGNMENT PLANNING
      1. The daily diary
      2. The assignments desk
    3. SOURCES
      1. The agencies
      2. Making contact
      3. Keeping the list
    4. MAKING USE OF YOUR CONTACTS
      1. The double-check
      2. Briefings and lobbies
      3. Uses and abuses
    5. RESISTING POLITICAL PRESSURES
      1. Defending against ‘the spin’
      2. Video news releases
  10. GETTING STARTED
    1. SEEING HOW IT’S DONE (1)
      1. Stage 1: Planning and assignments
      2. Stage 2: On the road
      3. Stage 3: Picture editing
    2. WATCHING BRIEF (2)
      1. Stage 4: Graphics
      2. Stage 5: The newsroom
      3. Stage 6: Studio and production
      4. Stage 7: Practice
    3. MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR TALENT
      1. Style and ‘presence’
      2. The need for training
    4. DRESSING THE PART (1)
      1. Keeping the audience’s attention
      2. Programme dress rules
    5. DRESSING THE PART (2)
      1. Accessories
      2. Hairstyles
      3. Beards
      4. Cosmetics
    6. VOICE PRODUCTION
      1. The wish to communicate
      2. Pronunciation
    7. SPEECH CLARITY
      1. No smoking rules
      2. Conquering stage fright
    8. A FRIEND IN THE AUDIENCE
      1. Be logical
      2. Develop a rapport
      3. Learn from others
  11. WRITING TECHNIQUE
    1. HOW TO WRITE FOR TELEVISION
      1. Keep it simple
      2. Write as you speak
      3. Be logical
      4. Avoid stupidities
    2. GOOD LANGUAGE
      1. Slang
      2. Eponyms
      3. Clichés
      4. Acronyms
    3. AVOIDING UNNECESSARY OFFENCE
      1. Sexism
      2. Racism
      3. Ageism
      4. Political labels
    4. AIMING FOR COMPREHENSION
      1. Keep in touch
      2. Signposting
      3. Facts and figures
    5. WRITING TO PICTURES
      1. Golden rules of writing for television
    6. USING THE SHOT-LIST
      1. Common errors
    7. WORDS BEFORE PICTURES
      1. ‘Wild-track’ commentary
      2. Leave room for the ‘sound-bites’
      3. Influence of new technology
  12. COVERING A NEWS ITEM
    1. INTRODUCING THE NEWS CAMERA
      1. Staff versus freelance
      2. Camera crew numbers
      3. Single crewing
      4. Video journalists
    2. CAMERACREW WHO’S WHO
      1. Camera operators
      2. Sound recordists
      3. Engineers
      4. Electricians
    3. PART OF THE TEAM
      1. Discuss content
      2. Sensitivities
    4. CAMERA AND SOUND EQUIPMENT
      1. Electronic news gathering
      2. Enter the camcorder
      3. The advantage of ENG
    5. SOUND
      1. Personal microphone
      2. Directional microphone
      3. Stick microphone
      4. Radio microphone
      5. Other microphone types
  13. BASIC REPORTING SKILLS
    1. STAND-UPPERS
      1. The right backgrounds
      2. Centre-screen or to one side?
    2. MEMORYAIDS
      1. How to remember the words
      2. Alternatives
      3. Electronic prompting
      4. Miniature tape recorders
    3. THE ART OF INTERVIEWING
      1. Preparation
      2. Questions
    4. INTERVIEW PREPARATION
      1. Submitting questions
      2. Tone
    5. INTERVIEW TECHNIQUE
      1. Putting the questions
      2. Supplementaries
      3. Cliché questions
    6. INTERVIEW TYPES
      1. Set-piece interviews
      2. Doorstepping
    7. EYEWITNESSES AND OTHERS
      1. Vox pops
      2. News conferences
    8. CUTAWAY QUESTIONS
      1. Noddies
      2. Interview editing
  14. THE REPORTER AS PRODUCER
    1. CONSTRUCTING A PACKAGE (1)
      1. Research
      2. Planning the shape
      3. The ‘recce’
      4. Knowing what to shoot
      5. Editorial partnership
      6. Accompany the crew
    2. CONSTRUCTING A PACKAGE (2)
      1. The grammar of pictures
      2. Picture composition
      3. Sound
    3. WHATTOKEEPIN,WHAT TO LEAVE OUT
      1. Viewing the rushes
      2. Interview extracts (sound-bites)
    4. YOUR PLACE IN THE PROGRAMME
      1. Writing the introduction
      2. ‘Musical’ news
  15. GETTING IT BACK
    1. ON THE ROAD
      1. At your own pace
      2. The hazards of going live
      3. Coping with spectators
    2. COVERING THE WORLD
      1. Sources
    3. THE FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT
      1. Choosing a base
      2. Correspondent costs
      3. The danger of ‘going native’
    4. ENTER THE FIRE BRIGADE
      1. Overcoming the first barriers
      2. Inoculations and passports
    5. ON FOREIGN SOIL
      1. The independent news team
      2. Setting up
      3. Doing your homework
    6. COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES
      1. How satellites work
      2. Satellite news gathering
    7. STAYING ALIVE
      1. The vulnerability of television
      2. Protection for journalists
      3. Red Cross lifeline
  16. THE REPORTER AS PRESENTER
    1. THE JOURNALIST’S SURVIVAL CODE
    2. THE ANCHOR
      1. The journalist/presenter
      2. Presenter power
    3. IN THE STUDIO
      1. Thriving under pressure
      2. In your own words …
      3. … and those of others
    4. PERFECTING POSTURE
      1. The wriggle routine
      2. Using a clipboard
    5. THE SCRIPT PROMPTER AND HOW TO USE IT
      1. Beyond the idiot board
      2. Avoid the shifty look
    6. TALKBACK
      1. The floor manager
    7. PRESENTERS IN PARTNERSHIP
      1. Attracting the audience
      2. Dividing the work
      3. Formality and informality
    8. STUDIO INTERVIEWING (1)
      1. The interviewer’s test
      2. Interview one plus one
    9. STUDIO INTERVIEWING (2)
      1. Interview one plus two
      2. Firmness counts
      3. Interview one plus more than two
      4. Live interview do’s and don’ts
    10. TRICKY CUSTOMERS AND ‘SPIN DOCTORS’
      1. The tactics, and ‘spin doctors’
    11. INTERVIEWEE ON THE ATTACK
      1. Softening up the interviewer
      2. Ignoring the question
      3. Other ploys
      4. Post-interview troubles
    12. AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION
      1. Programme format
      2. Be prepared
    13. PHONE-INS
      1. Achieving balance
      2. Concentrate on the caller
    14. WHEN THINGS GO WRONG
      1. Beware intruders
      2. Keep calm
    15. LAST WORDS ON INTERVIEWING
      1. To pay or not to pay?
      2. Looking after your guest
      3. On the air
      4. Illustrating the interview
      5. How you say goodbye …
    16. DOCUMENTARIES
      1. Shape and content
      2. Documentary production
    17. USING FILM
      1. Film technique
      2. Sound
      3. Using video with film
    18. THE REPORTER AS COMMENTATOR
      1. First principles
      2. Sport
  17. ETHICS
    1. WHOSE BIAS?
      1. Impartiality versus balance
      2. Neutrality
      3. Fairness
    2. THE BOUNDS OF GOOD TASTE
      1. The danger in your presence
      2. Scenes of violence
      3. Your responsibility
      4. Violence: code of practice
    3. OTHER CODES OF CONDUCT
      1. The Post’s policy
      2. Commensense rules
    4. THE OXYGEN OF PUBLICITY
      1. The journalist’s dilemma
      2. News blackouts
      3. Direct action
    5. INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM
      1. The difficulty for television
      2. The need for care
      3. In-depth reporting
    6. MATTERS OF LAW
      1. Defamation
      2. Contempt of court
      3. Copyright and Official Secrets
      4. Other laws
  18. CONCLUSIONS
    1. TV REPORTING: 2000 AND BEYOND
      1. The TV reporter and the World Wide Web
  19. GLOSSARY
  20. FURTHER READING