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Automotive Ethernet

Book Description

Do you need to get up to date with the world's most popular networking technology? With this resource you will discover everything you need to know about Ethernet and its implementation in the automotive industry. Enhance your technical understanding and better inform your decision-making process so that you can experience the benefits of Ethernet implementation. From new market opportunities, to lower costs, and less complex processes; this is the first book to provide a comprehensive overview of automotive Ethernet. Covering electromagnetic requirements and physical layer technologies, Quality of Service, the use of VLANs, IP, and Service Discovery, as well as network architecture and testing, this unique and comprehensive resource is a must have, whether you are a professional in the automotive industry, or an academic who needs a detailed overview of this revolutionary technology and its historical background.

Table of Contents

  1. Coverpage
  2. Half title page
  3. Title page
  4. Copyright page
  5. Contents
  6. Preface
  7. List of abbreviations
  8. Timeline
  9. 1 A brief history of “Ethernet” (from a car manufacturer’s perspective)
    1. 1.1 From the beginning
    2. 1.2 The meaning of “Ethernet”
      1. 1.2.1 Ethernet in the IEEE
      2. 1.2.2 Ethernet in industrial automation
      3. 1.2.3 Ethernet in aviation
      4. 1.2.4 Ethernet in telecommunications
      5. 1.2.5 “Automotive Ethernet”
    3. Notes
    4. References
  10. 2 A brief history of in-car networking
    1. 2.1 Role of in-car networking
    2. 2.2 Traditional in-car networking
      1. 2.2.1 The early days of in-car networking
      2. 2.2.2 Controller Area Network (CAN)
      3. 2.2.3 Local Interconnect Network (LIN)
      4. 2.2.4 Media Oriented Systems Transport (MOST)
      5. 2.2.5 FlexRay
      6. 2.2.6 Pixel links
      7. 2.2.7 Consumer links
      8. 2.2.8 Trends and consequences
    3. 2.3 Responsibilities in in-car networking
      1. 2.3.1 Role of the relationship between car manufacturer and suppliers
      2. 2.3.2 Role of the relationships among car manufacturers
    4. Notes
    5. References
  11. 3 A brief history of Automotive Ethernet
    1. 3.1 The first use case: programming and software updates
      1. 3.1.1 Architectural challenges
      2. 3.1.2 Potential car interface technologies
      3. 3.1.3 The solution: 100BASE-TX Ethernet
    2. 3.2 The second use case: a “private” application link
    3. 3.3 The Breakthrough: UTSP Ethernet for automotive
    4. 3.4 BMW internal acceptance of UTSP Ethernet
      1. 3.4.1 Yet another in-car networking technology
      2. 3.4.2 A suitable pilot application
      3. 3.4.3 The future of Automotive Ethernet at BMW
    5. 3.5 The industry framework for a new technology
      1. 3.5.1 From a proprietary solution to an open standard
      2. 3.5.2 Shaping the future at IEEE
      3. 3.5.3 Supportive organizations
    6. 3.6 Industry wide acceptance of Ethernet
    7. Notes
    8. References
  12. 4 The physical transmission
    1. 4.1 The Physical Layer (PHY) technology
      1. 4.1.1 100 Mbps BroadR-Reach (OABR)
      2. 4.1.2 Other 100 Mbps solutions
      3. 4.1.3 Technologies for higher data rates
    2. 4.2 The automotive communication channel
      1. 4.2.1 Channel framework for OABR
      2. 4.2.2 OABR channel parameters
    3. 4.3 ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC)
      1. 4.3.1 Coupling mechanisms of electromagnetic interference
      2. 4.3.2 Standards for EMC
      3. 4.3.3 Measuring EMC
      4. 4.3.4 Typical EMC results for an OABR link
      5. 4.3.5 ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD)
    4. 4.4 Other requirements
      1. 4.4.1 The quality strain
      2. 4.4.2 Power over Data Line (PoDL)
      3. 4.4.3 Using Energy Efficient Ethernet (EEE) in cars
    5. Notes
    6. References
  13. 5 Protocols for Automotive Ethernet
    1. 5.1 Quality of Service (QoS) and Audio Video Bridging (AVB)
      1. 5.1.1 How AVB came to Ethernet
      2. 5.1.2 The AVB use cases
      3. 5.1.3 The AVB protocols and their use in automotive
      4. 5.1.4 Quality of Service (QoS) for safety critical control data
    2. 5.2 Security and VLANs
    3. 5.3 Using the Internet Protocol (IP)
      1. 5.3.1 Dynamic versus static addressing
      2. 5.3.2 IPv4 versus IPv6
    4. 5.4 Middleware and SOME/IP
      1. 5.4.1 Definition of “middleware”
      2. 5.4.2 The history of SOME/IP
      3. 5.4.3 SOME/IP features
      4. 5.4.4 Service Discovery (SD)
    5. Notes
    6. References
  14. 6 Ethernet in automotive system development
    1. 6.1 A brief overview of the system development process
    2. 6.2 The software architecture
    3. 6.3 The Electric Electronic (EE) networking architecture
      1. 6.3.1 EE architecture in perspective
      2. 6.3.2 The communication network architecture
      3. 6.3.3 The supply network
    4. 6.4 Test and qualification
    5. Notes
    6. References
  15. 7 Outlook
    1. Notes
    2. References
  16. Index