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Author Experience

Book Description

Author Experience examines how content management systems are used, the weaknesses of their interfaces, and how to build interfaces that improve content quality and productivity.

Table of Contents

  1. Author Experience
    1. Foreword
    2. Preface
      1. 1. Disclaimer & Explanation
      2. 2. Acknowledgements
    3. I. Author Experience Basics
      1. 1. Introduction
        1. 1.1. The communication process
      2. 2. What is Author Experience?
        1. 2.1. Which author?
          1. 2.1.1. The author environment
          2. 2.1.2. The human author
        2. 2.2. The role of content management
          1. 2.2.1. The scope of content management
          2. 2.2.2. Why content management?
          3. 2.2.3. The purpose of content management
        3. 2.3. A definition of author experience
          1. 2.3.1. Why now?
      3. 3. The Current State of Author Experience
        1. 3.1. Messy system, messy content
          1. 3.1.1. The state of the CMmess
          2. 3.1.2. Exposing the value
          3. 3.1.3. Professional tools for professional communicators
        2. 3.2. Purchasing a platform
          1. 3.2.1. Technology purchasing process
          2. 3.2.2. I need a new CMS
          3. 3.2.3. Rethinking the process
          4. 3.2.4. I need a new CMS, part 2
        3. 3.3. Weighing author experience against user experience
        4. 3.4. Taking the lead in improving AX
      4. 4. The Challenges to Good Author Experience
        1. 4.1. Knowing how to communicate
          1. 4.1.1. I can do that
          2. 4.1.2. The value-add
          3. 4.1.3. Solving the knowing-how-to-communicate challenge
        2. 4.2. The communication goal
          1. 4.2.1. In the beginning…
          2. 4.2.2. Content in a digitally distributed world
          3. 4.2.3. The goal
          4. 4.2.4. Solving the communication goal challenge
        3. 4.3. The technologists’ paradigms
          1. 4.3.1. The CMS’s dirty underwear
          2. 4.3.2. Keeping track of associations
          3. 4.3.3. Whose paradigms matter?
          4. 4.3.4. The upgrade path
          5. 4.3.5. The flexible system
          6. 4.3.6. Solving the technologists’ paradigms challenge
        4. 4.4. Content coupling
          1. 4.4.1. Single output (presentation coupling)
          2. 4.4.2. In-line rules (context coupling)
          3. 4.4.3. Treated like sheep (behavior coupling)
          4. 4.4.4. One device at a time
          5. 4.4.5. Solving the content coupling challenge
        5. 4.5. Workflow that… doesn’t
          1. 4.5.1. Stop, go, get confused
          2. 4.5.2. The approvals escape hatch
          3. 4.5.3. How work flows
          4. 4.5.4. Solving the workflow challenge
        6. 4.6. Content ownership
          1. 4.6.1. Who owns the content?
          2. 4.6.2. The evolution of ownership
          3. 4.6.3. Owning the archive
          4. 4.6.4. Syndicated content
          5. 4.6.5. Solving the content ownership challenge
        7. 4.7. Mental models
          1. 4.7.1. The page
          2. 4.7.2. Selfishness of pages
          3. 4.7.3. Thinking about thinking
          4. 4.7.4. Writing in sand
          5. 4.7.5. Adaptive content
          6. 4.7.6. The content complexity issue
          7. 4.7.7. Solving the mental models challenge
        8. 4.8. Metadata
          1. 4.8.1. Too much information
          2. 4.8.2. Types of metadata
          3. 4.8.3. Meta-metadata
          4. 4.8.4. Solving the metadata challenge
    4. II. Practical Author Experience
      1. 5. Hierarchy of Author Experience Needs
        1. 5.1. Fit-for-purpose language
          1. 5.1.1. Not all synonyms are equal
          2. 5.1.2. Explaining the obscure
          3. 5.1.3. Consistency of terminology
          4. 5.1.4. Consistency of management logic
          5. 5.1.5. Content association paradigms
        2. 5.2. Content accessibility
          1. 5.2.1. Output-based navigation
          2. 5.2.2. The tree model
          3. 5.2.3. Filtered types
          4. 5.2.4. Dynamic multi-axis content filtering
        3. 5.3. Associative structured content
          1. 5.3.1. Constraints
          2. 5.3.2. Structured content
          3. 5.3.3. Reusability and repurposability
          4. 5.3.4. Semantic relationships
          5. 5.3.5. Dynamic associations
          6. 5.3.6. Sequence and narrative flow
          7. 5.3.7. Information hierarchy
          8. 5.3.8. Emphasis and proximity
        4. 5.4. Rules-based presentation
          1. 5.4.1. Adaptive presentation
          2. 5.4.2. Content for the user’s context
          3. 5.4.3. Contextual presentation models
          4. 5.4.4. The input presentation context
          5. 5.4.5. Adaptive previewing
          6. 5.4.6. Behavioral previewing
        5. 5.5. Content management tools
          1. 5.5.1. Solve approvals offline, first
          2. 5.5.2. Iterative content association
          3. 5.5.3. Content, not pages
          4. 5.5.4. Multi-axis content filtering
          5. 5.5.5. Flexible triggers
        6. 5.6. Self-aware content
          1. 5.6.1. Dependency awareness
          2. 5.6.2. Contextual content grouping
          3. 5.6.3. Learning systems
          4. 5.6.4. Helpful suggestions
      2. 6. Conducting an Author Experience Audit
        1. 6.1. Goals of the AX audit
          1. 6.1.1. Common aspects of AX audits
          2. 6.1.2. Existing-system AX audit
          3. 6.1.3. New-system AX audit
        2. 6.2. Tools of the trade
        3. 6.3. Technical business analysis
          1. 6.3.1. Why the information?
          2. 6.3.2. Who, what, and where?
          3. 6.3.3. The wider value
        4. 6.4. Content design and governance
        5. 6.5. Author experience design
          1. 6.5.1. Reused paradigms
          2. 6.5.2. Sub-structured content
          3. 6.5.3. How much detail?
          4. 6.5.4. A definition of mandatory
          5. 6.5.5. To form or not to form?
          6. 6.5.6. Integrating analytics
          7. 6.5.7. System capabilities
        6. 6.6. Information architecture
        7. 6.7. Auditing
        8. 6.8. Measuring author experience quality
          1. 6.8.1. Paradigms
          2. 6.8.2. The fit-for-purpose system
          3. 6.8.3. Value of an improvement
          4. 6.8.4. Upgradability of the system
          5. 6.8.5. Upgradability of the business
      3. 7. Author Experience Design Patterns
        1. 7.1. UI label management
          1. 7.1.1. The challenge
          2. 7.1.2. Why it matters
          3. 7.1.3. An approach that works
          4. 7.1.4. Authoring labels
        2. 7.2. Integrated label use
          1. 7.2.1. The challenge
          2. 7.2.2. Why it matters
          3. 7.2.3. An approach that works
        3. 7.3. Label structure deployment
          1. 7.3.1. The challenge
          2. 7.3.2. Why it matters
          3. 7.3.3. An approach that works
        4. 7.4. Content consoles
          1. 7.4.1. The challenge
          2. 7.4.2. Why it matters
          3. 7.4.3. Approaches
          4. 7.4.4. The partial approach
          5. 7.4.5. The best solution approach
        5. 7.5. Narrative
          1. 7.5.1. The challenge
          2. 7.5.2. Why it matters
          3. 7.5.3. An approach that works
          4. 7.5.4. The complicated part
        6. 7.6. WYSISMUC
          1. 7.6.1. The challenge
          2. 7.6.2. Why it matters
          3. 7.6.3. An approach that works
        7. 7.7. Selection by date
          1. 7.7.1. The challenge
          2. 7.7.2. Why the confusion?
          3. 7.7.3. Why it matters
          4. 7.7.4. Approaches that work
        8. 7.8. Referrer / referee links
          1. 7.8.1. The challenge
          2. 7.8.2. Why it matters
          3. 7.8.3. An approach that works
          4. 7.8.4. Inbound references
        9. 7.9. Stored or searched references
          1. 7.9.1. The challenge
          2. 7.9.2. Why it matters
          3. 7.9.3. An approach that works
    5. III. The Future of Author Experience
      1. 8. Moving Forward with Author Experience
        1. 8.1. A new name for old rope?
        2. 8.2. The customers are more important
        3. 8.3. It’s too much work
        4. 8.4. CMS vendors
        5. 8.5. Conflict of author interest
        6. 8.6. Silos (Who owns content?)
        7. 8.7. The Agile battlefield
      2. 9. In Conclusion
        1. 9.1. The evolution of content management
          1. 9.1.1. Integrated information flow
          2. 9.1.2. Distributed publication
          3. 9.1.3. Give me semantics
          4. 9.1.4. Tools for the job
          5. 9.1.5. Enter author experience
        2. 9.2. Moving forward
          1. 9.2.1. A dedicated field
          2. 9.2.2. For clients: you are not a nail
          3. 9.2.3. For implementers / vendors: your duty of care
          4. 9.2.4. For practitioners: the long road ahead
    6. Glossary
    7. About the Author
    8. Index
    9. Colophon
    10. A. Copyright and Legal Notices