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Audiovisual Archives: Digital Text and Discourse Analysis

Book Description

Today, audiovisual archives and libraries have become very popular especially in the field of collecting, preserving and transmitting cultural heritage. However, the data in these archives or libraries - videos, images, soundtracks, etc. - constitute as such only potential cognitive resources for a given public (or "target community"). One of the most crucial issues of digital audiovisual libraries is indeed to enable users to actively appropriate audiovisual resources for their own concern (in research, education or any other professional or non-professional context). This means, an adaptation of the audiovisual data to the specific needs of a user or user group can be represented by small and closed "communities" as well as by networks of open communities around the globe.

"Active appropriation" is, basically speaking, the use of existing digital audiovisual resources by users or user communities according to their expectations, needs, interests or desires. This process presupposes: 1) the definition and development of models or "scenarios" of cognitive processing of videos by the user; 2) the availability of tools necessary for defining, developing, reusing and sharing meta-linguistic resources such as thesauruses, ontologies or description models by users or user communities.

Both aspects are central to the so-called semiotic turn in dealing with digital (audiovisual) texts, corpora of texts or again entire (audiovisual) archives and libraries. They demonstrate practically and theoretically the well-known "from data to metadata" or "from (simple) information to (relevant) knowledge" problem, which obviously directly influences the effective use, social impact and relevancy, and therefore also the future, of digital knowledge archives. This book offers a systematic, comprehensive approach to these questions from a theoretical as well as practical point of view.

Contents

Part 1. The Practical, Technical and Theoretical Context

1. Analysis of an Audiovisual Resource.

2. The Audiovisual Semiotic Workshop (ASW) Studio - A Brief Presentation.

3. A Concrete Example of a Model for Describing Audiovisual Content.

4. Model of Description and Task of Analysis.

Part 2. Tasks in Analyzing an Audiovisual Corpus

5. The Analytical Task of "Describing the Knowledge Object".

6. The Analytical Task of "Contextualizing the Domain of Knowledge".

7. The Analytical Task of "Analyzing the Discourse Production around a Subject".

Part 3. Procedures of Description

8. Definition of the Domain of Knowledge and Configuration of the Topical Structure.

9. The Procedure of Free Description of an Audiovisual Corpus.

10. The Procedure of Controlled Description of an Audiovisual Corpus.

Part 4. The ASW System of Metalinguistic Resources

11. An Overview of the ASW Metalinguistic Resources.

12. The Meta-lexicon Representing the ASW Universe of Discourse.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Dedication
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright
  5. Preface
  6. PART 1: The Practical, Technical and Theoretical Context
    1. Chapter 1: Analysis of an Audiovisual Resource
      1. 1.1. Introduction
      2. 1.2. Functionally different corpora
      3. 1.3. Descriptive models
      4. 1.4. On the activity of analysis of audiovisual corpora
      5. 1.5. On the activity of indexation
      6. 1.6. Some reflections on the subject of the theoretical reference framework
    2. Chapter 2: The Audiovisual Semiotic Workshop (ASW) Studio – A Brief Presentation
      1. 2.1. A working environment for analyzing corpora of audiovisual texts
      2. 2.2. Brief presentation of the ASW Description Workshop
      3. 2.3. Four approaches to analyzing an audiovisual text
      4. 2.4. Models of description and interactive working forms
    3. Chapter 3: A Concrete Example of a Model for Describing Audiovisual Content
      1. 3.1. Introduction
      2. 3.2. Selecting the appropriate model from the library of descriptive models of description of audiovisual content
      3. 3.3. The sequences in a model of content description
      4. 3.4. Field of description and sequential organization of an analytical form
      5. 3.5. The level of schemas of definition and procedures of description
    4. Chapter 4: Model of Description and Task of Analysis
      1. 4.1. Introduction
      2. 4.2. The structural organization of a model of audiovisual content description
      3. 4.3. The canonic syntagmatic order of a form of description
      4. 4.4. Types of analysis, analytical tasks, procedures of description and activities of description
      5. 4.5. Particular tasks in analyzing the content of an audiovisual corpus
      6. 4.6. Concluding remarks
  7. PART 2: Tasks in Analyzing an Audiovisual Corpus
    1. Chapter 5: The Analytical Task of “Describing the Knowledge Object”
      1. 5.1. Introduction
      2. 5.2. A simple example of referential description
      3. 5.3. Thematic structure, topical structure and referential objects
      4. 5.4. A library of sequences for referential description
      5. 5.5. Alternative functional architectures to define sequences of referential description
    2. Chapter 6: The Analytical Task of “Contextualizing the Domain of Knowledge”
      1. 6.1. Introduction
      2. 6.2. Contextualization by spatial location
      3. 6.3. Location and contextualization by country
      4. 6.4. Geographical-physical location and contextualization
      5. 6.5. Contextualization by temporal location
      6. 6.6. Contextualization by historical era
      7. 6.7. Historical contextualization and periodization
      8. 6.8. Thematic contextualization
    3. Chapter 7: The Analytical Task of “Analyzing the Discourse Production around a Subject”
      1. 7.1. Introduction
      2. 7.2. Procedures of discourse production
      3. 7.3. Anatomy of the description of discourse production around a subject
      4. 7.4. Examples illustrating analysis of discourse production
      5. 7.5. Textual and discursive assessment
  8. PART 3: Procedures of Description
    1. Chapter 8: Definition of the Domain of Knowledge and Configuration of the Topical Structure
      1. 8.1. Introduction
      2. 8.2. Some reminders and specifications
      3. 8.3. (Re-)configuring and adapting an existing topical structure
      4. 8.4. (Re-)configuring more complex topical structures
    2. Chapter 9: The Procedure of Free Description of an Audiovisual Corpus
      1. 9.1. Introduction
      2. 9.2. Organization of the so-called "free description" procedure
      3. 9.3. The descriptive activity [Minimal designation]
      4. 9.4. The descriptive activity [Contextualized designation]
      5. 9.5. The activities of [Drafting of a summary presentation] and [Designation of the referent in the original language]
      6. 9.6. The descriptive activity [Designation of the referent by keywords]
      7. 9.7. Pragmatic and onomasiological variants of the activity of [Minimal designation]
    3. Chapter 10: The Procedure of Controlled Description of an Audiovisual Corpus
      1. 10.1. Introduction
      2. 10.2. Organization of the procedure called controlled description
      3. 10.3. Working with several micro-thesauruses
      4. 10.4. Selecting, classifying and ranking terms using a micro-thesaurus
      5. 10.5. An approach combining controlled and free description
  9. PART 4: The ASW System of Metalinguistic Resources
    1. Chapter 11: An Overview of the ASW Metalinguistic Resources
      1. 11.1. Introduction
      2. 11.2. General overview of the ASW system of metalinguistic resources
      3. 11.3. The ASW meta-lexicon of conceptual terms
      4. 11.4. The ASW thesaurus
      5. 11.5. The schemas of definition
      6. 11.6. The sequences of description
      7. 11.7. Resources external to the ASW system
      8. 11.8. ASW Modeling Workshop
    2. Chapter 12: The Meta-lexicon Representing the ASW Universe of Discourse
      1. 12.1. Introduction
      2. 12.2. “Conceptual term” and “theme” – a few explanations
      3. 12.3. The definitional structure of a topic
      4. 12.4. The ASW universe of discourse
      5. 12.5. The general organization of the vocabulary relating to analytical objects in the ASW universe of discourse
      6. 12.6. Questions relating to the organization of the ASW vocabulary of conceptual terms representing analytical objects
      7. 12.7. The process of developing the ASW vocabulary of conceptual terms defining analytical objects
    3. Chapter 13: Detailed Presentation of the Conceptual Vocabulary [Object of analysis]
      1. 13.1. Introduction
      2. 13.2. The two branches [Natural object] and [Object of value]
      3. 13.3. Questions of organization of the ASW meta-lexicon
      4. 13.4. How are we to take account of different classifications?
      5. 13.5. The conceptual domain represented by the term [Functional material object]
      6. 13.6. The conceptual domain represented by the term [Social object]
      7. 13.7. The conceptual domain represented by the term [Cultural object]
      8. 13.8. Taxonomic domains belonging to the branch [Primary symbolic object]
      9. 13.9. Taxonomic domains belonging to the branch [Secondary symbolic object]
      10. 13.10. The taxonomic domains of the branch [Object “Perdurant”]
      11. 13.11. The taxonomic domains of the branch [Object “Region”]
    4. Chapter 14: The Meta-lexicon of Activities Involved in Analyzing the Textual Object
      1. 14.1. Introduction
      2. 14.2. Four categories of textual analysis activities
      3. 14.3. The class of activities [Procedure of structural analysis of the textual object]
      4. 14.4. The class of activities [Procedure of analysis of the textual object using the ASW thesaurus]
      5. 14.5. The class of activities [Procedure of analysis using an ASW external reference]
      6. 14.6. The class of activities [Procedure of pragmatic analysis of the textual object]
      7. 14.7. Activity of analysis and schemas of indexation
      8. 14.8. The library of schemas of indexing
    5. Chapter 15: The ASW Thesaurus
      1. 15.1. Introduction
      2. 15.2. General presentation of the ASW thesaurus
      3. 15.3. Facets and lists of standardized expressions
    6. Chapter 16: The Configurational Building Blocks of Models of Description
      1. 16.1. Introduction
      2. 16.2. Analysis of an audiovisual text and models of description
      3. 16.3. The library of sequences making up the model of thematic description
      4. 16.4. Definition and insertion of a sequence into a model of description
      5. 16.5. Summary presentation of a library of schemas of definition
  10. Conclusion and Perspectives
  11. Bibliography
  12. Glossary of Specialized Terms
  13. Glossary of Acronyms
  14. Index