You are previewing Arduino Internals.

Arduino Internals

Cover of Arduino Internals by Dale Wheat Published by Apress
  1. Title
  2. Dedication
  3. Contents at a Glance
  4. Contents
  5. About the Author
  6. About the Technical Reviewers
  7. Acknowledgments
  8. Preface
    1. Intended Audience
    2. What This Book Isn't
    3. Chapter Overview
    4. Summary
  9. Chapter 1: Hardware
    1. What Is an Arduino?
    2. The Arduino Uno
    3. The Arduino Mega 2560
    4. Previous Hardware
    5. Who Makes Arduinos?
    6. Build Your Own
    7. Summary
  10. Chapter 2: Software
    1. Hosts and Targets
    2. Step by Step
    3. Semiautomatic
    4. Going Further
    5. Summary
  11. Chapter 3: Atmel AVR
    1. Origins
    2. AVR Device Families
    3. When in Doubt: Product Datasheets
    4. Device Packaging
    5. Pin Descriptions
    6. AVR Core
    7. Internal Peripherals
    8. Summary
  12. Chapter 4: Supporting Hardware
    1. Schematic Diagrams
    2. Getting Power to the Board
    3. Serial Interface
    4. The Processor
    5. Room for Expansion
    6. The Mechanical Form Factor
    7. Universal Serial Bus (USB): Signals Plus Power
    8. Summary
  13. Chapter 5: Arduino Software
    1. Open Source Software
    2. Multiplatform Support
    3. The Arduino Heritage
    4. Installing the Software
    5. The Process, or “How to Arduino”
    6. A Tour of the User Interface
    7. Summary
  14. Chapter 6: Optimizations
    1. How Will You Know It Worked?
    2. Shrink Blink
    3. Saving Space with Simple Serial Communication
    4. Saving SRAM
    5. Low Power or High Speed?
    6. Electronic Measurements
    7. Summary
  15. Chapter 7: Hardware Plus Software
    1. Available Peripherals
    2. Summary
  16. Chapter 8: Example Projects
    1. Beyond the Blinking LED: Starting Simply
    2. Other Uses for a Blinking LED
    3. A Lot of Blinking LEDs
    4. A Digital Clock
    5. Summary
  17. Chapter 9: Project Management
    1. Documentation
    2. Teamwork and Collaborative Development
    3. Licensing Your Work
    4. Summary
  18. Chapter 10: Hardware Design
    1. Learning About Hardware
    2. Infrared Proximity Sensor
    3. Your Own Custom Arduino
    4. Design Software
    5. Summary
  19. Chapter 11: Software Design
    1. Advanced Topics Within Arduino
    2. And Without Arduino
    3. Summary
  20. Chapter 12: Networking
    1. Point-to-Point Networking
    2. MIDI: Musical Instrument Digital Interface
    3. The Internet
    4. Summary
  21. Chapter 13: More Example Projects
    1. An Autonomous Robot
    2. Power Supply
    3. Motion Control
    4. Sensors
    5. Control Systems
    6. Example Robot Projects
    7. Summary
  22. Index
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A Tour of the User Interface

The basic framework of the main user interface remains the same from previous versions, as shown earlier in Figure 5-2. A single editor window dominates the screen, with traditional menu items at the very top and a toolbar of icons directly underneath. A status area is presented at the bottom of the screen.

The main updates from previous versions are partly aesthetic and partly functional. The color scheme has been tweaked a bit, and the icons have evolved from their original pixilated line drawings into more visually identifiable symbols.

The toolbar no longer responds to the Shift modifier of previous versions, which offered the verbose output option for the compile and upload processes and the “…in a new window” ...

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