O'Reilly logo

Arduino For Dummies by John Nussey

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 16

Getting to Know Processing

In This Chapter

arrow Getting excited about Processing

arrow Making shapes of all sizes and colors

In the previous chapters, you learn all about using Arduino as a stand-alone device. A program is uploaded onto the Arduino and it carries out its task ad infinitum until it is told to stop or powered down. You are affecting the Arduino by simple, clear, electrical signals, and as long as there are no outside influences or coding errors, and if the components last, the Arduino reliably repeats its function. This simplicity is extremely useful for many applications and allows the Arduino to not only serve as a great prototyping platform but also work as a reliable tool for interactive products and installations for many years, as it already does in many museums.

Although this simplicity is something to admire, many applications are outside the scope of an Arduino’s capabilities. One of these (at least for now) is running computer software. Although the Arduino is basically a computer, it’s not capable of running comparably large and complex computer programs in the same way as your desktop or laptop. Many of these programs are highly specialized depending on the task that you’re doing. You could benefit hugely if only you could link this software to the physical ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required