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Applying the Actor-Network Theory in Media Studies

Book Description

Actor-Network Theory (ANT), originally a social theory, seeks to organize objects and non-human entities into social networks. Its most innovative claim approaches these networks outside the anthropocentric view, including both humans and non-human objects as active participants in a social context; because of this, the theory has applications in a myriad of domains, not merely in the social sciences. Applying the Actor-Network Theory in Media Studies applies this novel approach to media studies. This publication responds to the current trends in international media studies by presenting ANT as the new theoretical paradigm through which meaningful discussion and analysis of the media, its production, and its social and cultural effects. Featuring both case studies and theoretical and methodical meditations, this timely publication thoroughly considers the possibilities of these disparate, yet divergent fields. This book is intended for use by researchers, students, sociologists, and media analysts concerned with contemporary media studies.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Book Series
    1. Mission
    2. Coverage
  5. List of Reviewers
    1. List of Reviewers
  6. Preface
    1. INTRODUCTION
    2. TARGET AUDIENCE
    3. CHAPTERS
    4. CONCLUSION
    5. REFERENCES
  7. Section 1: Introduction and Theoretical Concepts
    1. Chapter 1: Applications of Actor-Network Theory in Media Studies
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. AGENCY, POWER AND DISCOURSE ANALYSIS
      4. MEDIA PRODUCTION: EXTENSIONS OF THE NETWORK
      5. MEDIA, MEDIATORS AND MEDIATIZATION
      6. PROSPECT
      7. REFERENCES
      8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      9. ENDNOTES
    2. Chapter 2: The End of Media
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. MEDIA AND MEDIATION
      4. THE SECOND MEDIA AGE
      5. THE END OF MEDIA
      6. ACTOR-MEDIA THEORY
      7. MEDIA AND NETWORKS
      8. THE MODE OF EXISTENCE OF MEDIA
      9. REFERENCES
      10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      11. ENDNOTES
    3. Chapter 3: From Intermediality to Intermateriality
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. POST-STRUCTURALIST MEDIA STUDIES AND MEDIAL LOGIC
      4. FROM INTERMEDIALITY TO INTERMATERIALITY: ANT AS “TRANSLATION” OF POST-STRUCTURALISM
      5. AGENCY
      6. DISSOLVING THE MEDIAL: BUT HOW?
      7. AMENDMENTS AND EXTRAPOLATIONS: THE REMOTE CONTROL
      8. THE REMOTE CONTROL AS A MEDIATOR
      9. USER-GENERATED CONTENT
      10. NOTE
      11. REFERENCES
      12. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      13. ENDNOTES
    4. Chapter 4: The Subject of Media Studies
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. PRELUDE: CONSIDERING SELFIES
      3. THE SUBJECT
      4. TRANSCENDENTAL AND EMPIRICAL METAPHYSICS OF MEDIA STUDIES: “MEDIA AS EXTENSIONS OF MAN”
      5. DELEUZE AS A MISSING LINK
      6. CONCLUSION: BE YOUR SELFIE
      7. REFERENCES
      8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      9. ENDNOTES
    5. Chapter 5: What Critical Media Studies Should Not Take from Actor-Network Theory
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. MEDIA FROM AN ANT PERSPECTIVE
      4. CONCLUSION
      5. REFERENCES
      6. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      7. ENDNOTES
  8. Section 2: Case Studies
    1. Chapter 6: A Cyborg Perspective
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. MICHAEL CHOROST’S REBUILT: FROM HARD-OF-HEARING TO COCHLEAR IMPLANT HEARING
      4. ACTOR-NETWORK THEORY AS A CYBORG PERSPECTIVE
      5. MICHAEL CHOROST’S AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL ACCOUNT OF HIS CYBORGIZATION
      6. THE MEDIALITY OF CYBORGIZATION: A MEDIA THEORETICAL PROSPECT
      7. REFERENCES
      8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      9. ENDNOTES
    2. Chapter 7: Actor-Network Theory and Media Studies
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. ACTOR TRANSLATION: SOME KEY CONCEPTS
      4. THE LAUNCH OF LOCAL TV
      5. THE PAST LOCAL TV LANDSCAPE
      6. NOTTS TV AND THE CBJ NETWORK: EXPLORING ACTOR TRANSLATION AND NETWORK STABILITY
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. REFERENCES
      9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    3. Chapter 8: Applying Actor-Network Theory in Production Studies
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BARBAROSA LOG
      4. CONCEPTUAL PRINCIPLES OF ACTOR-NETWORK THEORY
      5. FORMATION
      6. REQUIEM
      7. REFERENCES
      8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      9. ENDNOTES
    4. Chapter 9: Anaphoric Trajectories of Creative Processes
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. APPLYING ACTOR-NETWORK THEORY VS. RESEARCHING ANAPHORIC TRAJECTORIES
      4. THE CASE OF A FAILED FILM PROJECT
      5. ANALYZING A YEAR OF DEVELOPMENT
      6. DISCUSSION
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. REFERENCES
      9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    5. Chapter 10: “To Be as Real as Possible”
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. FILM PRODUCTION AND ACTOR-NETWORK THEORY: A THEORETICAL OVERVIEW
      4. CONCLUSION
      5. REFERENCES
      6. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      7. ENDNOTES
    6. Chapter 11: The Home Console Dispositive
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE TERM “DISPOSITIVE”
      4. THE HOME CONSOLE DISPOSITIVE OF DIGITAL GAMES
      5. THE HOME CONSOLE DISPOSITIVE AS A SOCIO-TECHNICAL ARRANGEMENT
      6. THE MEDIAL INFRASTRUCTURES OF THE HOME CONSOLE DISPOSITIVE OF DIGITAL GAMES
      7. GAMING CULTURE WITHIN THE HOME CONSOLE DISPOSITIVE OF DIGITAL GAMES
      8. THE HOME CONSOLE DISPOSITIVE OF THE PLAYSTATION
      9. CONCLUSION AND PERSPECTIVES
      10. NOTE
      11. REFERENCES
      12. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      13. ENDNOTES
  9. Section 3: Criticizing Actor-Network-Theory and Media Studies
    1. Chapter 12: On Habit and Fiction in Latours' Inquiry and Fictional Knowledge on Habit in Proust's Recherche
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. DESCRIBING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BEINGS OF FICTION AND BEINGS OF TECHNOLOGY
      4. CONCLUSION
      5. REFERENCES
      6. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      7. ENDNOTES
    2. Chapter 13: Talking about Associations and Descriptions or a Short Story about Associology
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE ENROLMENT OF DESCRIPTION
      4. THE DIFFERENCE A NETWORK MAKES
      5. CONCLUSION: ANT IN MEDIA STUDIES
      6. REFERENCES
      7. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      8. ENDNOTES
    3. Chapter 14: A Critique of Operativity
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. TERMINOLOGICAL AMBIGUITY
      3. ETYMOLOGY AND USE
      4. “OPERATIONS” IN THE SCIENCES: NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF A CONCEPT
      5. THE TRIUMPH OF OPERATIONALISM
      6. OPERATIVE SEQUENCES AND THE PERVASIVENESS OF THE TECHNICAL
      7. THE VICTORY OF CYBERNETICS
      8. POSTHUMANIST FANTASIES OF THE OPERATORS
      9. NOTE
      10. REFERENCES
      11. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      12. ENDNOTES
    4. Chapter 15: Mind the Gap
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. STRUCTURAL AND THEORETICAL INTERSECTIONS OF ANT AND MEDIA THEORY
      4. RELATIONS OF THE HUMAN AND NON-HUMAN
      5. DIFFERENCES OF ANT AND GERMAN MEDIA THEORY
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
      8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      9. ENDNOTES
    5. Chapter 16: ANTi-Human
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE ETHICAL DIFFERENCE: THE OTHER
      4. A GUN-CITIZEN IS NON-HUMAN
      5. CONCLUSION
      6. REFERENCES
      7. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
      8. ENDNOTES
  10. Compilation of References
  11. About the Contributors