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Anarchy, State, and Utopia

Book Description

In this brilliant and widely acclaimed book, winner of the 1975 National Book Award, Robert Nozick challenges the most commonly held political and social positions of our age—liberal, socialist, and conservative.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Contents
  5. Foreword by Thomas Nagel
  6. Preface
  7. Acknowledgments
  8. PART I: State-of Nature Theory, or How to Back into a State without Really Trying
    1. 1. Why State-of-Nature Theory?
      1. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
      2. EXPLANATORY POLITICAL THEORY
    2. 2. The State of Nature
      1. PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATIONS
      2. THE DOMINANT PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION
      3. INVISIBLE-HAND EXPLANATIONS
      4. IS THE DOMINANT PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION A STATE?
    3. 3. Moral Constraints and the State
      1. THE MINIMAL STATE AND THE ULTRAMINIMAL STATE
      2. MORAL CONSTRAINTS AND MORAL GOALS
      3. WHY SIDE CONSTRAINTS/
      4. LIBERTARIAN CONSTRAINTS
      5. CONSTRAINTS AND ANIMALS
      6. THE EXPERIENCE MACHINE
      7. UNDERDETERMINATION OF MORAL THEORY
      8. WHAT ARE CONSTRAINTS BASED UPON?
      9. THE INDIVIDUALIST ANARCHIST
    4. 4. Prohibition, Compensation, and Risk
      1. INDEPENDENTS AND THE DOMINANT PROTECTIVE AGENCY
      2. PROHIBITION AND COMPENSATION
      3. WHY EVER PROHIBIT’
      4. RETRIBUTIVE AND DETERRENCE THEORIES OF PUNISHMENT
      5. DIVIDING THE BENEFITS OF EXCHANGE
      6. FEAR AND PROHIBITION
      7. WHY NOT ALWAYS PROHIBIT?
      8. RISK
      9. THE PRINCIPLE OF COMPENSATION
      10. PRODUCTIVE EXCHANGE
    5. 5. The State
      1. PROHIBITING PRIVATE ENFORCEMENT OF JUSTICE
      2. “THE PRINCIPLE OF FAIRNESS”
      3. PROCEDURAL RIGHTS
      4. HOW MAY THE DOMINANT AGENCY ACT’
      5. THE DE FACTO MONOPOLY
      6. PROTECTING OTHERS
      7. THE STATE
      8. THE INVISIBLE-HAND EXPLANATION OF THE STATE
    6. 6. Further Considerations on the Argument for the State
      1. STOPPING THE PROCESS?
      2. PREEMPTIVE ATTACK
      3. BEHAVIOR IN THE PROCESS
      4. LEGITIMACY
      5. THE RIGHT OF ALL TO PUNISH
      6. PREVENTIVE RESTRAINT
  9. PART II: Beyond the Minimal State?
    1. 7. Distributive Justice
      1. SECTION I:
        1. THE ENTITLEMENT THEORY
        2. HISTORICAL PRINCIPLES AND END-RESULT PRINCIPLES
        3. PATTERNING
        4. HOW LIBERTY UPSETS PATTERNS
        5. SEN’S ARGUMENT
        6. REDISTRIBUTION AND PROPERTY RIGHTS
        7. LOCKE’S THEORY OF ACQUISITION
        8. THE PROVISO
      2. SECTION II:
        1. RAWLS’ THEORY
        2. SOCIAL COOPERATION
        3. TERMS OF COOPERATION AND THE DIFFERENCE PRINCIPLE
        4. THE ORIGINAL POSITION AND END-RESULT PRINCIPLES
        5. MACRO AND MICRO
        6. NATURAL ASSETS AND ARBITRARINESS
        7. THE POSITIVE ARGUMENT
        8. THE NEGATIVE ARGUMENT
        9. COLLECTIVE ASSETS
    2. 8. Equality, Envy, Exploitation, Etc.
      1. EQUALITY
      2. EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY
      3. SELF-ESTEEM AND ENVY
      4. MEANINGFUL WORK
      5. WORKERS’ CONTROL
      6. MARXIAN EXPLOITATION
      7. VOLUNTARY EXCHANGE
      8. PHILANTHROPY
      9. HAVING A SAY OVER WHAT AFFECTS YOU
      10. THE NONNEUTRAL STATE
      11. HOW REDISTRIBUTION OPERATES
    3. 9. Demoktesis
      1. CONSISTENCY AND PARALLEL EXAMPLES
      2. THE MORE-THAN-MINIMAL STATE DERIVED
      3. HYPOTHETICAL HISTORIES
  10. PART III: Utopia
    1. 10. A Framework for Utopia
      1. THE MODEL
      2. THE MODEL PROJECTED ONTO OUR WORLD
      3. THE FRAMEWORK
      4. DESIGN DEVICES AND FILTER DEVICES
      5. THE FRAMEWORK AS UTOPIAN COMMON GROUND
      6. COMMUNITY AND NATION
      7. COMMUNITIES WHICH CHANGE
      8. TOTAL COMMUNITIES
      9. UTOPIAN MEANS AND ENDS
      10. HOW UTOPIA WORKS OUT
      11. UTOPIA AND THE MINIMAL STATE
  11. Notes
  12. Bibliography
  13. Index