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American Signal Intelligence in Northwest Africa and Western Europe

Book Description

A study of how U.S. communications intelligence units supported American military operations in NW Africa and Western Europe during WWII.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Historian's Introduction
  3. Foreword
  4. Author's Note
  5. Introduction
    1. Note
  6. 1. The Mediterranean Area
    1. 1. Situation Report
      1. 1.1. Early Conditions
      2. 1.2. Early British Experience with Field SIGINT
      3. 1.3. German Army and Air Force SIGINT Organizations
      4. 1.4. U.S. Preparations for SIGINT Service in the West
      5. 1.5. The Call of the Mediterranean
      6. 1.6. Notes
    2. 2. Beginnings in Northwest Africa
      1. 2.1. Planning SIGINT Service in Operation TORCH
      2. 2.2. Operation TORCH
      3. 2.3. Tunisia: Organization for the Second Phase
      4. 2.4. Action during January 1943
      5. 2.5. Notes
    3. 3. Axis Initiative in February 1943
      1. 3.1. Axis Plans — Allied Expectations
      2. 3.2. Allied Reversals, 14–17 February 1943
      3. 3.3. Through Kasserine Pass
      4. 3.4. Recapitulation
      5. 3.5. Two Opposing Army Groups
      6. 3.6. Notes
    4. 4. The March Offensives
      1. 4.1. Expectations
      2. 4.2. II Corps Attacks: Gafsa, Maknassy, and El Guettar
      3. 4.3. The Enemy Retreat to the Bridgehead
      4. 4.4. Notes
    5. 5. The Final Phase in Tunisia
      1. 5.1. Summary
      2. 5.2. The Attack Begins
      3. 5.3. The End in Tunisia
      4. 5.4. Notes
    6. 6. From Africa to Europe
      1. 6.1. Decisions in 1943
      2. 6.2. French Aid
      3. 6.3. Beginnings of the 849th Signal Intelligence Service
      4. 6.4. Detachments and Detachments
      5. 6.5. SIGINT before Operation HUSKY
      6. 6.6. "J" Service
      7. 6.7. Invading Sicily
      8. 6.8. Allies Push — Enemy Pulls Out
      9. 6.9. Some Results
      10. 6.10. Notes
    7. 7. Salerno to Rome
      1. 7.1. Preliminaries
      2. 7.2. Operation AVALANCHE
      3. 7.3. Enemy Strategy
      4. 7.4. Tactical SIGINT Service
      5. 7.5. In the "Winter Line"
      6. 7.6. Operation SHINGLE at Anzio
      7. 7.7. "Y" Service during the First Phase at Anzio
      8. 7.8. From Landing to Stalemate
      9. 7.9. The Liberation of Rome — 4 June 1944
      10. 7.10. Notes
    8. 8. The Final Months in the Mediterranean Theater
      1. 8.1. Pursuit to the Arno and Beyond
      2. 8.2. Po Valley and Surrender
      3. 8.3. Southern France: Operation DRAGOON
      4. 8.4. Notes
  7. 2. Western Europe
    1. 9. The Forming of Signal Intelligence Service, ETOUSA
      1. 9.1. Derivation and Beginnings
      2. 9.2. Planning in the Theater
      3. 9.3. The Invasion Begins
      4. 9.4. The Structure of SIS, ETOUSA
      5. 9.5. Final Stage of Training in the United Kingdom
      6. 9.6. Assignment of the SRI Companies
      7. 9.7. Into Action
      8. 9.8. Early Days for the Corps Signal Service Companies (RI)
      9. 9.9. 3d Radio Squadron Mobile and Its Detachments
      10. 9.10. Notes
    2. 10. A Summary Version of the Campaigns in ETOUSA
    3. 11. Aspects of Collaboration in Special Intelligence
      1. 11.1. Beginnings
      2. 11.2. U.S. Navy Attempts to Produce Special Intelligence
      3. 11.3. U.S. Army Preparations to Produce Special Intelligence
      4. 11.4. The U.S. Army – GCCS Agreement in May 1943
      5. 11.5. The Friedman, McCormack, and Taylor Mission — April to June 1943
      6. 11.6. Collaboration under the Army's 17 May Agreement
      7. 11.7. Later Collaboration between OP-20-G and GCCS
      8. 11.8. Special Intelligence in the Invasion of Normandy, June 1944
      9. 11.9. Notes
    4. 12. From Normandy to the Seine
      1. 12.1. General Considerations
      2. 12.2. The Breakout
      3. 12.3. Circling the Enemy's Southern Flank
      4. 12.4. SIGINT and the Capture of Brest
      5. 12.5. Notes
    5. 13. To the Westwall
      1. 13.1. Pursuit in the North
      2. 13.2. Pursuit to the Moselle River
      3. 13.3. Improvement in Enemy Cryptography
      4. 13.4. Seventh Army
      5. 13.5. Third Army Reaches the Westwall
      6. 13.6. Notes
    6. 14. The Ardennes Offensive, 16 December 1944 — 20 January 1945
      1. 14.1. Situation at the Outset
      2. 14.2. The Enemy Is Contained and Pushed Back
      3. 14.3. SIGINT Coverage during the Ardennes Campaign
      4. 14.4. Examples of SIGINT during the Enemy's Advance
      5. 14.5. Special Intelligence
      6. 14.6. Examples of "Y" SIGINT as the Attackers Withdrew
      7. 14.7. Notes
    7. 15. Winter and Spring Battles, 1944–1945
      1. 15.1. Through the Westwall to the Rhine
      2. 15.2. The Bridge at Remagen
      3. 15.3. Samples of Special Intelligence in March 1945
      4. 15.4. German Collapse
      5. 15.5. Notes
    8. 16. Some General Considerations
      1. 16.1. Notes
  8. A. Agreement between the War Department and G.C.&C.S.
  9. B. War Department The Adjutant General's Office Washington
  10. C. Headquarters European Theater of Operations United States Army
  11. D. War Department The Adjutant General's Office Washington
  12. E. Headquarters European Theater of Operations United States Army
  13. F. Headquarters European Theater of Operations United States Army
  14. G. U. S. Navy Department Agreement with the Admiralty
  15. H. Appendix H
    1. H.1. Part 1: American Embassy Office of the Military Attaché 1, Grosvenor Square, W. 1, London, England
    2. H.2. Part 2: American Embassy Office of the Military Attaché 1, Grosvenor Square, W.1, London, England
    3. H.3. Part 3: American Embassy Office of the Military Attaché 1, Grosvenor Square, W.1, London, England
    4. H.4. Part 4: American Embassy Office of the Military Attaché 1, Grosvenor Square, W. 1, London, England
    5. H.5. Part 5: American Embassy Office of the Military Attaché 1, Grosvenor Square, W. 1, London, England
  16. Bibliography
    1. General Histories of the Second World War
    2. General Cryptologic Histories
    3. Historical Studies
    4. Reports of Visits and Temporary Duty at GCCS
    5. Histories of SIGINT Units
    6. Other Sources