You are previewing Agile Experience Design: A Digital Designer’s Guide to Agile, Lean, and Continuous.

Agile Experience Design: A Digital Designer’s Guide to Agile, Lean, and Continuous

  1. Title Page
  2. Copyright Page
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Foreword
  5. Preface
  6. Contents
  7. Part One. Looking at agile and why designers should care
    1. 1. Redesigning Design
      1. Creative heroes and IT villains
      2. Don’t shoot the messenger
      3. Design in a vacuum
      4. Life and time has moved on
      5. A manifesto for agile experience design
      6. Make it collaborative, iterative, and intense
      7. Make the vision real
      8. Continuously develop the detail
      9. Make the design responsive
      10. What are we waiting for?
    2. 2. The Waterfall Has Dried Up
      1. Current state
      2. Agile deconstructed
      3. Agile experience design
      4. Redefining done
      5. In summary
      6. Coming next
    3. 3. I’m a designer, why should I care?
      1. Is agile anti-design?
      2. A big design challenge
      3. Where design fits
      4. Who are designers?
      5. In summary
      6. Coming next
    4. 4. Setting the Scene
      1. An agile experience design project
      2. Agile team structure and the role of the designer
      3. The agile project environment
      4. Agile project communication
      5. Agile project management
      6. In summary
      7. Coming next
  8. Part Two. How to design compelling experiences and deliver them—quickly
    1. 5. Get ready to go
      1. Identifying the problem—and the solution
      2. How do we do it?
      3. The role of models in the process
      4. Who do we need?
      5. How are we going to structure our time?
      6. We’re together, what now?
      7. In summary
      8. Coming next
    2. 6. Agile Discovery
      1. Getting started
      2. Three i’s of collaborative discovery
      3. Business Intentions
      4. Customer insights
      5. Implementation
      6. Bringing it all together
      7. In summary
      8. Coming next
    3. 7. Envisioning Success
      1. Creating creative
      2. Make it happen
      3. Idea generation
      4. Refine
      5. Explore
      6. Validate
      7. Pivot
      8. In summary
      9. Coming next
    4. 8. Elaboration: Ready, steady, build
      1. The minimum viable product
      2. User stories
      3. Goals and journeys
      4. Estimation
      5. In summary
      6. Coming next
    5. 9. Into Development
      1. Iterations: The heartbeat of delivery
      2. Working as a team
      3. Design documentation
      4. Working with the product owner
      5. Working in iterations
      6. In summary
      7. Coming next
    6. 10. Beyond Agile to Continuous
      1. What does launch look like?
      2. Beyond releases to continuous improvement
      3. Listen and measure
      4. Do the numbers add up?
      5. In summary
      6. Coming next
  9. Part Three. The Toolbox
    1. Affinity mapping
    2. Analytics
    3. As-is experience design review
    4. As-is/to-be process mapping
    5. Camera as documentation
    6. Collaborative design
    7. Competitor review
    8. Context scenarios
    9. Contextual inquiry
    10. Customer experience/journey map
    11. Customer testing
    12. Design review meeting
    13. Elevator pitch
    14. Ethnographic research
    15. Hot air balloon
    16. Idea generation
    17. Information design
    18. Insights
    19. Look inside
    20. Me and my shadow
    21. Personas
    22. Product box
    23. Prototyping
    24. Retrospective
    25. Showcase
    26. Stand-up
    27. Storyboarding
    28. Story map
    29. Task analysis
    30. Trade-off sliders
  10. Index
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Idea generation

Now that we’ve identified moments of opportunity, it’s time to think about how they might be addressed. To generate ideas we need to think about different styles of thinking. What we’re looking for at this point is divergent thinking, a concept attributed to the psychologist J. P. Guilford in the 1950s. In his description of divergent thinking he talks about four characteristics:

Fluency, the ability to rapidly produce lots of ideas.

Flexibility, the ability to consider different approaches and different options.

Originality, the ability to think differently about a problem.

Elaboration, the ability to think through the details of the idea and take it to the next step.

The converse of divergent thinking is convergent thinking, ...

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