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Advanced Networking Concepts Applied Using Linux on IBM System z

Book Description

This IBM® Redbooks® publication describes important networking concepts and industry standards that are used to support high availability on IBM System z®. Some of the networking standards described here are VLANs, VLAN trunking, link aggregation, virtual switches, VNICs, and load-balancing.

We examine the various aspects of network setups and introduce the main Linux on System z networking commands and configuration files. We describe the management of network interface parameters, assignment of addresses to a network interface, and usage of the ifconfig command to configure network interfaces.

We provide an overview of connectivity options available on the System z platform. We also describe high availability concepts and building a high availability solution using IBM Tivoli® System Automation. We also provide the implementation steps necessary to build a redundant network connections set up between an IBM z/VM® system and the external network switches using two Open Systems Adapter-Express 3 (OSA-Express 3) adapters with 10 Gb Ethernet ports.

We describe the tests performed in our lab environment. The objectives of these tests were to gather information about performance and failover from the perspective of a real scenario, where the concepts of described in this book were applied.

This book is focused on information that is practical and useful for readers with experience in network analysis and engineering networks, System z and Linux systems administrators, especially for readers that administer networks in their day-to-day activities.
For additional reading: A Technote is availalble that explains changes to using channel bonding interfaces introduced with SLES 11 SP 2.
It can be found at:

http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/tips1000.html?Open

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. The team who wrote this book
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Chapter 1. Networking concepts overview
    1. 1.1 Virtual local area network
    2. 1.2 VLAN trunking
      1. 1.2.1 IEEE 802.1Q protocol
      2. 1.2.2 Native VLAN
    3. 1.3 Link aggregation
    4. 1.4 Virtual switch
    5. 1.5 Virtual network interface controller
    6. 1.6 Ethernet autonegotiation
    7. 1.7 Maximum transmission unit
    8. 1.8 Spanning Tree Protocol
    9. 1.9 Load balancing
      1. 1.9.1 Layer 2 load sharing
      2. 1.9.2 Layer 3 load sharing
  5. Chapter 2. Linux on System z networking overview
    1. 2.1 Basic concepts
    2. 2.2 Overview of virtualization and networking
      1. 2.2.1 Guest LANs / HiperSockets
      2. 2.2.2 Virtual switches
      3. 2.2.3 Setting the vmcp module to be loaded during boot
      4. 2.2.4 Modifying VSWITCH from layer 3 to layer 2
      5. 2.2.5 The qeth driver
    3. 2.3 Important Linux network files
      1. 2.3.1 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 configuration files
      2. 2.3.2 Red Hat configuration files
      3. 2.3.3 How to add a qeth device manually
    4. 2.4 Network problem determination
      1. 2.4.1 Inter-User Communication Vehicle
      2. 2.4.2 The qeth interface is not online
      3. 2.4.3 Layer 2 mismatch in the VSWITCH configuration
  6. Chapter 3. Linux networking tools
    1. 3.1 Network setup
      1. 3.1.1 Managing network interface parameters
      2. 3.1.2 Names
      3. 3.1.3 Routing
      4. 3.1.4 Applications management
    2. 3.2 Monitoring, diagnosing, and measuring the performance of the network
      1. 3.2.1 SSH and secure connections
      2. 3.2.2 Basic network protocols
      3. 3.2.3 Monitoring
      4. 3.2.4 Diagnosing
      5. 3.2.5 Advanced diagnostic procedures
  7. Chapter 4. Using channel bonding interfaces
    1. 4.1 Overview
    2. 4.2 Setting up channel bonding
      1. 4.2.1 Troubleshooting
  8. Chapter 5. High availability with Linux on System z
    1. 5.1 Basic concepts
    2. 5.2 Definitions of high availability
    3. 5.3 High availability configurations
      1. 5.3.1 Active / standby
      2. 5.3.2 Active / active
    4. 5.4 Introduction to Tivoli System Automation
    5. 5.5 Tivoli System Automation implementation for IBM WebSphere MQ
      1. 5.5.1 Tivoli System Automation specifications per node cluster
      2. 5.5.2 Configuring Tivoli System Automation for IBM WebSphere MQ
      3. 5.5.3 Special commands to work with a Tivoli System Automation resource
      4. 5.5.4 Operational commands
  9. Chapter 6. Building a practical redundant solution
    1. 6.1 Lab environment configuration
    2. 6.2 IBM J48E switch configuration
      1. 6.2.1 Virtual Chassis setup
      2. 6.2.2 VLANs and VLAN interfaces configuration
      3. 6.2.3 Aggregated Ethernet interface configuration
      4. 6.2.4 MTU configuration
      5. 6.2.5 Linux on System z and z/VM LPARs
    3. 6.3 z/VM virtual switch definition
      1. 6.3.1 Port group definition
      2. 6.3.2 Defining virtual switches
    4. 6.4 Tuning for maximum performance
      1. 6.4.1 Buffer count
      2. 6.4.2 MTU size
  10. Chapter 7. Performance and failover tests
    1. 7.1 Performance tests and results
      1. 7.1.1 Tests with the iperf tool
      2. 7.1.2 Tests with the FTP protocol
      3. 7.1.3 Conclusions
    2. 7.2 Failover tests and results
      1. 7.2.1 The planned set of tests
      2. 7.2.2 Link failures
      3. 7.2.3 Physical switch failure
      4. 7.2.4 OSA-Express 3 card failure
      5. 7.2.5 Final conclusions
  11. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Other publications
    3. Online resources
    4. Help from IBM
  12. Back cover