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Access to Asia: Your Multicultural Guide to Building Trust, Inspiring Respect, and Creating Long-Lasting Business Relationships by Sharon Schweitzer, Bob Waisfisz, Liz Alexander

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Introduction

In the world of high-speed motor brands dominate—Formula One and NASCAR. Both require skill, strategy, and intense focus. In all other respects, they couldn't be more different.

Formula One is the racing equivalent of a Louis Vuitton store: high class, with European roots and international appeal. Formula One races, known as Grand Prix, showcase technologically sophisticated, single-seat, purpose-built cars driven by men like Prost, Villeneuve, and Schumacher with engines designed by world-class talent at Alfa Romeo, Ferrari, Maserati, Lotus, and Mercedes-Benz. The only two U.S. Americans who have won in Formula One's 62-year history are Phil Hill in 1961 and Mario Andretti in 1978.

NASCAR (the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing), on the other hand, is an all-American phenomenon whose heroes have first names such as Denny, JJ, and Kyle. Stock cars are almost indistinguishable from those you'd find in a Chevrolet, Ford, or Dodge showroom. In contrast to Formula One, almost all NASCAR Sprint Cup Series winners have been U.S. Americans. Whereas attendees at Formula One races can enjoy four-star hotels, expensive restaurants, suites and grandstand seats, NASCAR fans tend to prefer an RV, eat BBQ, and drink beer.

When Formula One announced that it would race again in the U.S. at the purpose-built track named Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas, many were surprised. Other U.S. venues were under consideration to host the race. However, misperceptions of ...

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