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ABCs of z/OS System Programming: Volume 9

Book Description

The ABCs of z/OS System Programming is an 13-volume collection that provides an introduction to the z/OS operating system and the hardware architecture. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced system programmer, the ABCs collection provides the information that you need to start your research into z/OS and related subjects. If you would like to become more familiar with z/OS in your current environment, or if you are evaluating platforms to consolidate your e-business applications, the ABCs collection will serve as a powerful technical tool.
The contents of the volumes are as follows:
Volume 1: Introduction to z/OS and storage concepts, TSO/E, ISPF, JCL, SDSF, and z/OS delivery and installation
Volume 2: z/OS implementation and daily maintenance, defining subsystems, JES2 and JES3, LPA, LNKLST, authorized libraries, SMP/E, Language Environment
Volume 3: Introduction to DFSMS, data set basics storage management hardware and software, catalogs, and DFSMStvs
Volume 4: Communication Server, TCP/IP, and VTAM
Volume 5: Base and Parallel Sysplex, System Logger, Resource Recovery Services (RRS), global resource serialization (GRS), z/OS system operations, automatic restart management (ARM), Geographically Dispersed Parallel Sysplex (GDPS)
Volume 6: Introduction to security, RACF, Digital certificates and PKI, Kerberos, cryptography and z990 integrated cryptography, zSeries firewall technologies, LDAP, and Enterprise identity mapping (EIM)
Volume 7: Printing in a z/OS environment, Infoprint Server and Infoprint Central
Volume 8: An introduction to z/OS problem diagnosis
Volume 9: z/OS UNIX System Services
Volume 10: Introduction to z/Architecture, zSeries processor design, zSeries connectivity, LPAR concepts, HCD, and HMC
Volume 11: Capacity planning, performance management, WLM, RMF, and SMF
Volume 12: WLM
Volume 13: JES3

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. The team who wrote this book
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Chapter 1. Products and components
    1. 1.1 z/OS UNIX System Services
    2. 1.2 z/OS UNIX System Services and z/OS
    3. 1.3 z/OS and z/OS UNIX
    4. 1.4 Product and component support for z/OS UNIX
    5. 1.5 Security Server RACF
    6. 1.6 Data Facility System-Managed Storage (DFSMS)
    7. 1.7 Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
    8. 1.8 System Modification Program Extended (SMP/E)
    9. 1.9 System Management Facility (SMF)
    10. 1.10 Resource Measurement Facility (RMF)
    11. 1.11 Virtual Lookaside Facility (VLF)
    12. 1.12 Time Sharing Option/Extended (TSO/E)
    13. 1.13 Workload Manager (WLM)
    14. 1.14 Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM)
  5. Chapter 2. z/OS UNIX overview
    1. 2.1 z/OS UNIX and UNIX applications
    2. 2.2 z/OS UNIX terminology overview
    3. 2.3 HFS and zFS file system PFSes
    4. 2.4 Using z/OS UNIX
    5. 2.5 z/OS UNIX System Services
    6. 2.6 Physical file systems
    7. 2.7 z/OS UNIX file sharing in a sysplex
    8. 2.8 z/OS UNIX file systems
    9. 2.9 File system data sets
    10. 2.10 Root file system
    11. 2.11 File and directory permission bits
    12. 2.12 MVS data sets versus file system files
    13. 2.13 zFS or HFS data sets
    14. 2.14 z/OS UNIX components
    15. 2.15 z/OS UNIX programs (processes)
    16. 2.16 Create a process
    17. 2.17 z/OS UNIX processes
    18. 2.18 z/OS UNIX interactive interfaces
    19. 2.19 ISPF Option 6
    20. 2.20 ISHELL command (ish)
    21. 2.21 User’s files and directories
    22. 2.22 OMVS shell session
    23. 2.23 OMVS command shell session
    24. 2.24 ls -al command - list files in the root
    25. 2.25 ISPF edit mode for a z/OS UNIX file
    26. 2.26 ISPF edit mode for a z/OS UNIX file
    27. 2.27 Specifying the z/OS UNIX path name
    28. 2.28 ISPF ENQs on z/OS UNIX files
    29. 2.29 Support for editing ASCII data
    30. 2.30 Handling line feed characters
    31. 2.31 Direct login to shell
    32. 2.32 Telnet access to z/OS UNIX
  6. Chapter 3. z/OS UNIX System Services preinstallation requirements
    1. 3.1 Customization of the root
    2. 3.2 Installing z/OS using ServerPac
    3. 3.3 Installing z/OS using CBPDO
    4. 3.4 ServerPac and CBPDO
    5. 3.5 z/OS UNIX System Services installation
    6. 3.6 z/OS UNIX security
    7. 3.7 RACF definitions
    8. 3.8 RACF OMVS segments
    9. 3.9 OMVS segment fields
    10. 3.10 UNIX security
    11. 3.11 z/OS UNIX superuser
    12. 3.12 RACF commands and user IDs
    13. 3.13 RACF commands to define groups
    14. 3.14 RACF commands to define users
    15. 3.15 LU and LG command examples
    16. 3.16 Define a terminal group name
    17. 3.17 TSO/E support
    18. 3.18 User access to TSO/E commands
  7. Chapter 4. z/OS UNIX System Services installation
    1. 4.1 z/OS UNIX PARMLIB - PROCLIB members
    2. 4.2 IEASYSxx PARMLIB member
    3. 4.3 z/OS UNIX minimum mode
    4. 4.4 Minimum mode: TFS
    5. 4.5 z/OS UNIX full-function mode
    6. 4.6 z/OS HFS root
    7. 4.7 zFS with z/OS V1R7
    8. 4.8 HFS or zFS data sets
    9. 4.9 Set data set type
    10. 4.10 Choosing zFS
    11. 4.11 ServerPac changes if using zFS
    12. 4.12 UNIX utilities: TSO/E commands
    13. 4.13 UNIX commands to move and copy data
    14. 4.14 The pax and tar utilities
    15. 4.15 ServerPac z/OS UNIX installation
    16. 4.16 Non-volatile root file system
    17. 4.17 Installation of other products
    18. 4.18 z/OS UNIX System Services installation
  8. Chapter 5. z/OS UNIX shell and utilities
    1. 5.1 The z/OS UNIX shell
    2. 5.2 Input, output, errors with UNIX shell
    3. 5.3 Accessing the z/OS UNIX shell
    4. 5.4 Controlling session resources
    5. 5.5 Dynamic /dev
    6. 5.6 Invoking the shell via TSO/E
    7. 5.7 Invoking the shell via rlogin or telnet
    8. 5.8 rlogin and telnet access
    9. 5.9 Customizing z/OS UNIX initialization
    10. 5.10 Initializing z/OS UNIX
    11. 5.11 Environment variables
    12. 5.12 Environment variables
    13. 5.13 The /etc/init.options file
    14. 5.14 The etc/rc file
    15. 5.15 The /etc/inittab file with z/OS V1R8
    16. 5.16 The _BPXK_INITTAB_RESPAWN variable
    17. 5.17 Rules for coding /etc/inittab
    18. 5.18 Customizing the OMVS command
    19. 5.19 Shell environment variables
    20. 5.20 Customizing your shell environment
    21. 5.21 Global variables in /etc/profile
    22. 5.22 User-defined settings
    23. 5.23 Setting the time zone
    24. 5.24 Customizing the C89/CC compilers
    25. 5.25 Code page tables
    26. 5.26 Specifying a code page
    27. 5.27 Internationalization variables (locales)
    28. 5.28 Setting the region size
    29. 5.29 Setting up printers for shell users
    30. 5.30 Installing books for OHELP
    31. 5.31 Using the man command
    32. 5.32 Enabling various tools
    33. 5.33 SVP for z/OS UNIX and tools
    34. 5.34 Setup Verification Program (SVP)
  9. Chapter 6. Security customization
    1. 6.1 RACF OMVS segments
    2. 6.2 z/OS UNIX UIDs and GIDs
    3. 6.3 z/OS UNIX users and groups
    4. 6.4 BPXROOT user ID
    5. 6.5 Superuser with appropriate authority
    6. 6.6 Commands for superusers
    7. 6.7 z/OS UNIX security and RACF profiles
    8. 6.8 z/OS UNIX security: BPX.SUPERUSER
    9. 6.9 z/OS UNIX superuser granularity
    10. 6.10 Resource names: UNIXPRIV
    11. 6.11 z/OS UNIX UNIXPRIV class profiles
    12. 6.12 Assigning UIDs
    13. 6.13 Shared UID prevention
    14. 6.14 Automatic UID and GID assignment
    15. 6.15 Automatic assignment requirements
    16. 6.16 Automatic assignment examples
    17. 6.17 Automatic assignment with RRSF
    18. 6.18 z/OS UNIX security: File security packet
    19. 6.19 Octal values for permission bits
    20. 6.20 Data set security versus file security
    21. 6.21 z/OS UNIX user’s security environment
    22. 6.22 Access checking flows
    23. 6.23 File authorization checking flow
    24. 6.24 POSIX standard and UNIX ACLs
    25. 6.25 Limitations of current permission bits
    26. 6.26 FSPs and ACLs
    27. 6.27 Access control list table
    28. 6.28 File authorization check summary
    29. 6.29 Profiles in UNIXPRIV class
    30. 6.30 Profiles in UNIXPRIV class (2)
    31. 6.31 RACF RESTRICTED attribute
    32. 6.32 z/OS UNIX file access checking
    33. 6.33 RESTRICTED user profile
    34. 6.34 Restricted user access checking
    35. 6.35 Access checking with ACLs (1)
    36. 6.36 Access checking with ACLs (2)
    37. 6.37 Create ACLs
    38. 6.38 ACL types
    39. 6.39 OMVS shell commands for ACLs
    40. 6.40 Create ACLs for a specific directory
    41. 6.41 Create an access ACL
    42. 6.42 Display the access ACL
    43. 6.43 Create a directory default ACL
    44. 6.44 Create a file default ACL
    45. 6.45 Creating all ACL types
    46. 6.46 Using the ISHELL panel
    47. 6.47 Create an access ACL using ISHELL
    48. 6.48 File attributes panel for /u/harry
    49. 6.49 File attributes panel showing ACLs
    50. 6.50 Select option to create an access ACL
    51. 6.51 Create an access ACL
    52. 6.52 Add an access ACL
    53. 6.53 Access ACL after creation
    54. 6.54 ACL inheritance: New directory/new file
    55. 6.55 Multilevel security with z/OS V1R5
    56. 6.56 Multilevel security (MLS)
    57. 6.57 MLS support for z/OS UNIX
    58. 6.58 Mandatory access control (MAC)
    59. 6.59 Discretionary access control (DAC)
    60. 6.60 SECLABELs and MAC
    61. 6.61 Special SECLABELs and definitions
    62. 6.62 SYSMULTI SECLABEL
    63. 6.63 z/OS UNIX and SECLABELs
    64. 6.64 Understanding UMASK
    65. 6.65 Displaying the UMASK
    66. 6.66 Default permissions and UMASK
    67. 6.67 Example of creating a new file
    68. 6.68 Can user JOE access the file
    69. 6.69 Can user ANN copy the file
    70. 6.70 Setting file permissions
    71. 6.71 Setting file permissions
    72. 6.72 List file and directory information
    73. 6.73 Introducing daemons
    74. 6.74 z/OS UNIX daemons
    75. 6.75 UNIX-level security for daemons
    76. 6.76 z/OS UNIX security: BPX.DAEMON
    77. 6.77 RACF program control
    78. 6.78 z/OS UNIX-level security for daemons
    79. 6.79 Start options for daemons
    80. 6.80 Define daemon security
    81. 6.81 Auditing options for z/OS UNIX
    82. 6.82 File-based auditing
    83. 6.83 Audit z/OS UNIX events
    84. 6.84 Chaudit command
    85. 6.85 List audit information for files
    86. 6.86 Auditing reports
    87. 6.87 Maintain z/OS UNIX-level security
    88. 6.88 Setting up z/OS UNIX (1)
    89. 6.89 Setting up z/OS UNIX (2)
    90. 6.90 Setting up z/OS UNIX (3)
    91. 6.91 Setting up z/OS UNIX (4)
    92. 6.92 Setting up z/OS UNIX (5)
    93. 6.93 RACF definitions for zFS
    94. 6.94 UNIXPRIV class with z/OS V1R3 and zFS
    95. 6.95 List current user IDs with the ISHELL
    96. 6.96 The BPXBATCH utility
    97. 6.97 The BPXBATCH job
    98. 6.98 BPXBATCH and shell commands
  10. Chapter 7. zFS file systems
    1. 7.1 zSeries File System (zFS)
    2. 7.2 zFS compatibility mode aggregate
    3. 7.3 BPXPRMxx definitions for zFS
    4. 7.4 zFS colony address space
    5. 7.5 HFS data sets and zFS data sets
    6. 7.6 zFS utilities and commands
    7. 7.7 zfsadm command
    8. 7.8 Allocate Linear VSAM data set
    9. 7.9 Create the aggregate from ISHELL
    10. 7.10 Format VSAM space - create aggregate
    11. 7.11 Format the aggregate
    12. 7.12 Ioeagfmt successful messages
    13. 7.13 Grow an aggregate
    14. 7.14 Dynamic aggregate extension
    15. 7.15 The -grow option
    16. 7.16 -grow option for formatting
    17. 7.17 Mounting the file system
    18. 7.18 ISHELL support for zFS
    19. 7.19 Panel of attached zFS aggregates
    20. 7.20 Display aggregate attributes
    21. 7.21 Display attached aggregates
    22. 7.22 List file systems
    23. 7.23 zFS aggregate space commands
    24. 7.24 Command for aggregate display
    25. 7.25 zFS threshold monitoring space usage
    26. 7.26 Dynamic configuration parameters
    27. 7.27 zfsadm configquery command options
    28. 7.28 zfsadm config command options
    29. 7.29 Defining IOEFSPRM options
    30. 7.30 Logical PARMLIB support
    31. 7.31 Specifying PARMLIB members
    32. 7.32 Add a volume to a zFS aggregate
    33. 7.33 zFS migration considerations
    34. 7.34 HFS/zFS as generic file system type
    35. 7.35 Migration considerations
    36. 7.36 Migration tool
    37. 7.37 Migration checks file system type
    38. 7.38 Migration tool enhancements with APAR OA18196
    39. 7.39 REXX exec - BPXWH2Z
    40. 7.40 BPXWH2Z panels
    41. 7.41 Space allocations - HFS versus zFS
    42. 7.42 Using the migration tool
    43. 7.43 BPXWH2Z panels
    44. 7.44 Using SMS if required
    45. 7.45 Migrate in the foreground
    46. 7.46 Migration steps
    47. 7.47 Migration steps
    48. 7.48 Migration steps continued
    49. 7.49 Alter allocation parameters panel
    50. 7.50 APAR OA18196 - Exact data set match
    51. 7.51 Migrating a list of data sets
    52. 7.52 Data set list displayed
    53. 7.53 Health Checker USS_HFS_DETECTED
    54. 7.54 Health Checker USS_HFS_DETECTED
    55. 7.55 Check with RUN_ON_MOUNT=YES
    56. 7.56 Special characters in zFS aggregates
    57. 7.57 BPXMTEXT shell command
  11. Chapter 8. File sharing in a sysplex
    1. 8.1 Shared file systems in a sysplex
    2. 8.2 Sysplex environment setup
    3. 8.3 File systems in a shared sysplex
    4. 8.4 Multiple systems: Different versions
    5. 8.5 Update BPXPRMxx for sysplex
    6. 8.6 OMVS couple data set
    7. 8.7 OMVS couple data set commands
    8. 8.8 D XCF,COUPLE,TYPE=BPXMCDS
    9. 8.9 Change to the SETXCF command
    10. 8.10 New message for command failure
    11. 8.11 File sharing in a sysplex
    12. 8.12 Mounting shared sysplex file systems
    13. 8.13 Accessing shared sysplex file systems
    14. 8.14 Shared file system AUTOMOVE takeover
    15. 8.15 Moving file systems in a sysplex
    16. 8.16 Requests to LFS to PFS to files
    17. 8.17 Systems accessing file systems
    18. 8.18 zFS sharing mode terminology
    19. 8.19 Defining zFS as sysplex-unaware
    20. 8.20 zFS File systems with APAR OA29712
    21. 8.21 Defining zFS as sysplex-aware
    22. 8.22 APAR OA29619
    23. 8.23 New zFS configuration options (OA29619)
    24. 8.24 Admin levels in a mixed sysplex
    25. 8.25 Defing zFS as syplex-aware
    26. 8.26 Using the sysplex=filesys parameter
    27. 8.27 Using the sysplex=filesys parameter
    28. 8.28 The sysplex_filesys_sharemode parameter
    29. 8.29 sysplex_filesys_sharemode considerations
    30. 8.30 sysplex_filesys_sharemode considerations
    31. 8.31 zFS mixed environment
    32. 8.32 zFS cache management
    33. 8.33 zFS sysplex-aware on a file system basis
    34. 8.34 Automatic movement of file systems
  12. Chapter 9. Managing file systems
    1. 9.1 Hierarchical file system (HFS)
    2. 9.2 File linking
    3. 9.3 Hard links
    4. 9.4 Symbolic links
    5. 9.5 External links
    6. 9.6 File system structure
    7. 9.7 Temporary directory space
    8. 9.8 Temporary file system (TFS)
    9. 9.9 Colony address space
    10. 9.10 Mounting file systems
    11. 9.11 Mount and unmount
    12. 9.12 Managing user file systems
    13. 9.13 User file systems: Direct mount
    14. 9.14 Mounting file systems
    15. 9.15 Option 3: Mount
    16. 9.16 Automount facility
    17. 9.17 Automount setup
    18. 9.18 Generic match on lowercase names
    19. 9.19 Automount facility overview
    20. 9.20 Activating automount
    21. 9.21 SETOMVS RESET=xx implementation
    22. 9.22 Issue the SETOMVS command
    23. 9.23 Updating an existing automount policy
    24. 9.24 Example of new options
    25. 9.25 One auto.master for a sysplex
    26. 9.26 HFS to zFS automount
    27. 9.27 HFS to zFS automount
    28. 9.28 Automount migration considerations
    29. 9.29 How to mount zFS file systems
    30. 9.30 Using direct mount commands
    31. 9.31 Mounting zFS file systems
    32. 9.32 MOUNT commands
    33. 9.33 zFS file system clone
    34. 9.34 Backup file system - zFS clone
    35. 9.35 zFS clone mounted
    36. 9.36 Using the clone
    37. 9.37 Mounting File Systems - (HFS - zFS)
    38. 9.38 MOUNT command options
    39. 9.39 UNMOUNT option
    40. 9.40 UNMOUNT option support
    41. 9.41 UNMOUNT option support
    42. 9.42 Mount file system panel
    43. 9.43 Set AUTOMOVE options
    44. 9.44 AUTOMOVE system list (syslist)
    45. 9.45 AUTOMOVE parameters for mounts
    46. 9.46 AUTOMOVE wildcard support
    47. 9.47 AUTOMOVE wildcard examples
    48. 9.48 Stopping zFS
    49. 9.49 Restarting the PFS
    50. 9.50 Mounting file systems with SET OMVS
    51. 9.51 Messages from shutdown of a ZFS single system
    52. 9.52 Messages for the restart of ZFS
    53. 9.53 Shutdown and recovery scenarios
    54. 9.54 zFS commands in a sysplex
    55. 9.55 zfsadm command changes for sysplex
    56. 9.56 zfsadm command changes
    57. 9.57 Configuration options
    58. 9.58 Command forwarding support
    59. 9.59 Indirect volsers with zFS data sets
    60. 9.60 Using indirect volume serials with cloned zFS data sets
    61. 9.61 Define a VSAM LDS and format
    62. 9.62 Delete the data set and IDCAMS DEFINE
    63. 9.63 Centralized BRLM support
    64. 9.64 Distributed BRLM
    65. 9.65 Define BRLM option in CDS
    66. 9.66 BRLM problems in a sysplex
    67. 9.67 z/OS V1R8 BRLM recovery of locks
    68. 9.68 File system access
    69. 9.69 File access
    70. 9.70 List file and directory information
    71. 9.71 File security packet - extattr bits
    72. 9.72 Extended attributes
    73. 9.73 APF-authorized attribute
    74. 9.74 Activate program control
    75. 9.75 Shared address space attribute
    76. 9.76 Shared library attribute
    77. 9.77 File format attribute
    78. 9.78 Extended attribute command example
    79. 9.79 Sticky bit
    80. 9.80 Set the UID/GID bit
  13. Chapter 10. Overview of TCP/IP
    1. 10.1 Introduction to TCP/IP
    2. 10.2 TCP/IP terminology
    3. 10.3 IPv4 addressing
    4. 10.4 IPv6 addresses
    5. 10.5 User login to the z/OS UNIX shell
    6. 10.6 Resolver address space
    7. 10.7 TCPDATA search order
    8. 10.8 Create configuration files used by TCP/IP
    9. 10.9 Customize the TCP/IP profile data set
    10. 10.10 Customize TCPDATA
    11. 10.11 z/OS IP search order
    12. 10.12 z/OS IP search order (2)
    13. 10.13 Customize the TCP/IP procedure
    14. 10.14 Customizing PARMLIB members for TCP/IP
    15. 10.15 PARMLIB members to customize for TCP/IP
    16. 10.16 RACF customization for TCP/IP
    17. 10.17 Customizing TCP/IP
    18. 10.18 TCP/IP shell commands
  14. Chapter 11. TCP/IP applications
    1. 11.1 Overview of z/OS UNIX data access
    2. 11.2 Sockets
    3. 11.3 z/OS Communications Server
    4. 11.4 z/OS UNIX sockets support
    5. 11.5 Customizing sockets
    6. 11.6 Logging in to the z/OS UNIX shell
    7. 11.7 Using inetd - master of daemons
    8. 11.8 Customize inetd
    9. 11.9 Customize inetd (2)
    10. 11.10 Login to a Unix system
    11. 11.11 rlogin to z/OS UNIX services
    12. 11.12 Activating z/OS UNIX rlogin daemon
    13. 11.13 Comparing shell login methods
    14. 11.14 Define TCP/IP daemons
    15. 11.15 The syslogd daemon
    16. 11.16 The FTPD daemon
    17. 11.17 z/OS IP search order for FTP
    18. 11.18 z/OS IP search order for /etc/services
    19. 11.19 Start the TCP/IP daemons
    20. 11.20 Message integration support
    21. 11.21 Message routing to z/OS
    22. 11.22 syslogd command options
    23. 11.23 syslogd defined instances
    24. 11.24 syslogd configuration file
    25. 11.25 Start procedure for syslogd
    26. 11.26 syslogd availability considerations
  15. Chapter 12. z/OS UNIX PARMLIB members
    1. 12.1 BPXPRMxx PARMLIB member
    2. 12.2 BPXPRMFS PARMLIB member
    3. 12.3 BPXPRMxx control keywords
    4. 12.4 BPXPRMxx PARMLIB member
    5. 12.5 Controlling the number of processes
    6. 12.6 Resource limits for processes
    7. 12.7 MAXFILEPROC statement
    8. 12.8 Setting file descriptors
    9. 12.9 Setting file descriptor for a single user
    10. 12.10 Display BPXPRMxx limits
    11. 12.11 Memory mapped files
    12. 12.12 Controlling thread resources
    13. 12.13 Creating a process using fork()
    14. 12.14 Values for forked child process
    15. 12.15 Starting a program with exec()
    16. 12.16 Values passed for exec() program
    17. 12.17 z/OS UNIX processes get STEPLIBs
    18. 12.18 Locating programs for z/OS UNIX processes
    19. 12.19 Shared pages for the fork() function
    20. 12.20 Spawn function
    21. 12.21 Interprocess communication functions
    22. 12.22 Address Space Memory Map z/OS V1R5
    23. 12.23 Control IPC resources
    24. 12.24 Kernel support for IBM 5.0 JVM
    25. 12.25 Interprocess communication signals
    26. 12.26 Pipes
    27. 12.27 Other BPXPRMxx keywords
    28. 12.28 More BPXPRMxx parameters
    29. 12.29 FILESYSTYPE statement
    30. 12.30 FILESYSTYPE and NETWORK
    31. 12.31 ROOT and MOUNT statements
    32. 12.32 Examples of MKDIR in BPXPRMxx
    33. 12.33 Allocating SWA above the line
    34. 12.34 z/OS UNIX Web site
  16. Chapter 13. Maintenance
    1. 13.1 Example of SMP/E SMPMCS
    2. 13.2 Active root file system
    3. 13.3 Inactive root file system (clone)
    4. 13.4 /SERVICE directory
    5. 13.5 Sample SMP/E DDDEFs
    6. 13.6 Prepare for SMP/E
    7. 13.7 SMP/E APPLY process
    8. 13.8 Supporting multiple service levels
    9. 13.9 Supporting multiple service levels (2)
    10. 13.10 ISHELL display of root
    11. 13.11 The chroot command
    12. 13.12 Testing a root file system
    13. 13.13 Testing the updated root
    14. 13.14 Dynamic service activation
    15. 13.15 Dynamic service activation commands
    16. 13.16 Using the new service
    17. 13.17 Deactivate service
    18. 13.18 Display service
  17. Chapter 14. z/OS UNIX operations
    1. 14.1 Commands to monitor z/OS UNIX
    2. 14.2 Display summary of z/OS UNIX
    3. 14.3 Display z/OS UNIX options
    4. 14.4 Display BPXPRMxx limits
    5. 14.5 Display address space information
    6. 14.6 Display process information
    7. 14.7 Display the kernel address space
    8. 14.8 z/OS V1R7 command options
    9. 14.9 Mount error messages displayed
    10. 14.10 Mount failure messages
    11. 14.11 Stopping BPXAS address spaces
    12. 14.12 LFS soft shutdown
    13. 14.13 z/OS V1R8 file system shutdown
    14. 14.14 Options with the D OMVS,F command
    15. 14.15 Options with the D OMVS,F command
    16. 14.16 New command examples
    17. 14.17 New command examples
    18. 14.18 New command examples
    19. 14.19 z/OS UNIX shutdown
    20. 14.20 Recommended shutdown procedures
    21. 14.21 Application registration
    22. 14.22 Display application registration
    23. 14.23 F OMVS,SHUTDOWN
    24. 14.24 Blocking processes completion
    25. 14.25 Shutdown processing completion
    26. 14.26 Shutdown for permanent processes
    27. 14.27 Shutdown processing final cleanup
    28. 14.28 F OMVS,RESTART
    29. 14.29 Alternate sysplex root
    30. 14.30 Defining an alternate root and mount
    31. 14.31 BPXPRMxx parmlib member - ALTROOT
    32. 14.32 Display information about processes
    33. 14.33 Stop a process
    34. 14.34 Superkill function
    35. 14.35 Superkill example
    36. 14.36 Changing OMVS parameter values
    37. 14.37 Manage interprocess communication
    38. 14.38 System problems
    39. 14.39 z/OS UNIX abends and messages
    40. 14.40 USS errors and codes
    41. 14.41 CTIBPX00 and CTCBPXxx
    42. 14.42 Tracing z/OS UNIX events
    43. 14.43 Debugging a z/OS UNIX problem
    44. 14.44 IPCS OMVSDATA reports
  18. Chapter 15. z/OS UNIX shell and programming tools
    1. 15.1 Language Environment run-time library
    2. 15.2 Using pre-LE run-time libraries
    3. 15.3 Overview of c89/cc/c++
    4. 15.4 Customization of /etc/profile for c89/cc/c++
    5. 15.5 Compile, link-edit, and run
    6. 15.6 Customization of Java for z/OS
    7. 15.7 Java virtual machine
    8. 15.8 Management of software and the make utility
    9. 15.9 The dbx debugger
    10. 15.10 The dbx debugger
    11. 15.11 Introduction to shells
    12. 15.12 REXX, CLISTs, and shell scripts
    13. 15.13 Shell script syntax
    14. 15.14 BPXBATCH enhancements
    15. 15.15 BPXBATCH implementation
    16. 15.16 BPXBATCH summary
    17. 15.17 TSO/E ALLOCATE command for STDPARM
    18. 15.18 STDERR and STDOUT as MVS data sets
    19. 15.19 BPXBATCH sample job
    20. 15.20 Child process created for MVS data sets
    21. 15.21 BPXBATCH utility
  19. Chapter 16. Performance, debugging, recovery, and tuning
    1. 16.1 z/OS UNIX performance overview
    2. 16.2 WLM in goal mode
    3. 16.3 Defining service classes
    4. 16.4 Workload Manager service classes
    5. 16.5 Subsystem type panel
    6. 16.6 WLM work qualifiers
    7. 16.7 OMVS work qualifiers
    8. 16.8 Defining classification rules
    9. 16.9 Classification rules
    10. 16.10 Classification rules for STC
    11. 16.11 Virtual lookaside facility (VLF)
    12. 16.12 VLF for z/OS UNIX
    13. 16.13 COFVLFxx updates for z/OS UNIX
    14. 16.14 AIM Stage 3
    15. 16.15 Further tuning tips
    16. 16.16 zFS performance tuning
    17. 16.17 zFS cache
    18. 16.18 zFS cache locations
    19. 16.19 Metadata backing cache
    20. 16.20 Performance APIs
    21. 16.21 Performance monitoring APIs
    22. 16.22 zfsadm query command
    23. 16.23 The IOEZADM utility from TSO for commands
    24. 16.24 Directory cache
    25. 16.25 Directory caching display tool
    26. 16.26 File system monitoring tool (FSMON)
    27. 16.27 The zfsadm query -iobyaggr command
    28. 16.28 SMF recording
    29. 16.29 SMF 92 subtype 14 enhancement
    30. 16.30 RMF reporting
    31. 16.31 RMF Monitor III support for zFS
    32. 16.32 zFS access to file systems
    33. 16.33 RMF Overview Report Selection Menu
    34. 16.34 zFS Summary Report
    35. 16.35 zFS Summary I/O details by type
    36. 16.36 User and vnode cache detail
    37. 16.37 DFSMSdss dump and restore for zFS file systems
    38. 16.38 UNQUIESCE command
    39. 16.39 zFS recovery support
    40. 16.40 zFS aggregate corruption
    41. 16.41 Debugging data sets
    42. 16.42 zFS hang detection
    43. 16.43 zFS hang detection
    44. 16.44 z/OS UNIX Internet information
  20. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Other publications
    3. Online resources
    4. How to get IBM Redbooks
    5. Help from IBM
  21. Back cover