You are previewing A Software Architect's Guide to New Java Workloads in IBM CICS Transaction Server.
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A Software Architect's Guide to New Java Workloads in IBM CICS Transaction Server

Book Description

This IBM® Redpaper Redbooks® publication introduces the IBM System z® New Application License Charges (zNALC) pricing structure and provides examples of zNALC workload scenarios. It describes the products that can be run on a zNALC logical partition (LPAR), reasons to consider such an implementation, and covers the following topics:

  • Using the IBM WebSphere Application Server Liberty profile to host applications within an IBM CICS® environment and how it interacts with CICS applications and resources

  • Security technologies available to applications that are hosted within a WebSphere Application Server Liberty profile in CICS

  • How to implement modern presentation in CICS with a CICS Liberty Java virtual machine (JVM) server

  • How to share scenarios to develop Liberty JVM applications to gain benefits from IBM CICS Transaction Server for IBM z/OS® Value Unit Edition

  • Considerations when using mobile devices to interact with CICS applications and explains specific CICS technologies for connecting mobile devices by using the z/OS Value Unit Edition

  • How IBM Operational Decision Manager for z/OS runs in the transaction server to provide decision management services for CICS COBOL and PL/I applications

  • Installing the CICS Transaction Server for z/OS (CICS TS) Feature Pack for Modern Batch to enable the IBM WebSphere® batch environment to schedule and manage batch applications in CICS

  • This book also covers what is commonly referred to as plain old Java objects (POJOs). The Java virtual machine (JVM) server is a full-fledged JVM that includes support for Open Service Gateway initiative (OSGi) bundles. It can be used to host open source Java frameworks and does just about anything you want to do with Java on the mainframe. POJO applications can also qualify for deployment using the Value Unit Edition. Read about how to configure and deploy them in this companion Redbooks publication:

    IBM CICS and the JVM server: Developing and Deploying Java Applications, SG24-8038

    Examples of POJOs are terminal-initiated transactions, CICS web support, web services, requests received via IP CICS sockets, and messages coming in via IBM WebSphere MQ messaging software.

    Table of Contents

    1. Front cover
    2. Notices
      1. Trademarks
    3. IBM Redbooks promotions
    4. Preface
      1. Authors
      2. Now you can become a published author, too
      3. Comments welcome
      4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
    5. Part 1 New workloads on the mainframe
    6. Chapter 1. Mainframe workload pricing
      1. 1.1 Advantages of the Value Unit Edition pricing model
      2. 1.2 CICS Transaction Server Value Unit Edition benefits
      3. 1.3 Business value
      4. 1.4 Why Java works on the mainframe
      5. 1.5 When and where to put Java on System z
      6. 1.6 Defying gravity
      7. 1.7 Solution overview
        1. 1.7.1 Using the Liberty profile to modernize interfaces
        2. 1.7.2 Optimizing mobile workloads to connect with customers and employees
        3. 1.7.3 Building timely, scalable decisions into software
        4. 1.7.4 Updating batch processing
      8. 1.8 Value Unit Edition incentives and implementation scenarios
        1. 1.8.1 Do more sooner at less cost
        2. 1.8.2 Do things faster
    7. Part 2 Liberty profile and CICS
    8. Chapter 2. Introduction to the Liberty JVM server
      1. 2.1 Evolving application servers
      2. 2.2 Advantages
        1. 2.2.1 Liberty and the CICS Transaction Server for z/OS Value Unit Edition
      3. 2.3 Strengths
        1. 2.3.1 Simple configuration
        2. 2.3.2 Runtime composition with features and services
        3. 2.3.3 Developer focus
      4. 2.4 Liberty in the CICS Transaction Server
        1. 2.4.1 Integration with CICS TS Transaction Server for z/OS
      5. 2.5 Security
        1. 2.5.1 Introduction to security with Liberty in CICS TS
        2. 2.5.2 Security overview
        3. 2.5.3 The Liberty server angel process
        4. 2.5.4 SAF roles
    9. Chapter 3. Using CICS Liberty JVM servers to develop application interfaces
      1. 3.1 CICS Liberty JVM server scenarios
        1. 3.1.1 Scenario one
        2. 3.1.2 Scenario two
      2. 3.2 CICS Liberty JVM server features for the presentation layer
        1. 3.2.1 JavaServer Pages 2.2
        2. 3.2.2 JavaServer Faces 2.0
        3. 3.2.3 Java Servlet 3.0
        4. 3.2.4 JavaScript Object Notation 1.0
        5. 3.2.5 Java API for RESTful Web Services
        6. 3.2.6 Java API for XML Web Services 2.2
        7. 3.2.7 Java Architecture for XML Binding 2.2
        8. 3.2.8 Bean Validation 1.0
        9. 3.2.9 PHP support by Dynamic Scripting Feature Pack
      3. 3.3 Migrate existing Java presentation logic to CICS Liberty JVM server
    10. Chapter 4. Porting JEE applications to a CICS Liberty JVM server
      1. 4.1 Porting a Java application to a CICS Liberty JVM server
        1. 4.1.1 Which Java applications should be migrated to CICS TS
        2. 4.1.2 Using the OSGi framework
      2. 4.2 Developing new application using JCICS classes
        1. 4.2.1 Java access to records and their fields
        2. 4.2.2 Debugging Java in CICS Liberty JVM server
      3. 4.3 Developing new applications using other Liberty features
        1. 4.3.1 CICS Liberty JVM server Java Database Connectivityoptions
        2. 4.3.2 JDBC connection options
    11. Part 3 Mobile devices
    12. Chapter 5. Connecting mobile devices to CICS Transaction Server
      1. 5.1 Mobile devices and IBM CICS Transaction Server for z/OS Value Unit Edition
      2. 5.2 Use of mobile devices with CICS TS
      3. 5.3 Accessing services by using XML and JSON
        1. 5.3.1 Extensible Markup Language (XML)
        2. 5.3.2 JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)
        3. 5.3.3 Key differences between XML and JSON
      4. 5.4 CICS TS web service development strategies
        1. 5.4.1 Bottom-up service enablement
        2. 5.4.2 Top-down service enablement
        3. 5.4.3 Meet-in-the-middle service enablement
      5. 5.5 IBM MobileFirst Platform Foundation and CICS TS
      6. 5.6 IBM DataPower and CICS TS
      7. 5.7 Configuration for high availability
    13. Chapter 6. Mobile devices and CICS Liberty JVM server
      1. 6.1 Hosting transformation services in CICS Liberty JVM server
        1. 6.1.1 Java API for XML Web Services (JAX-WS)
        2. 6.1.2 Java API for RESTful Web Services (JAX-RS)
      2. 6.2 z/OS Connect and CICS Liberty JVM server
      3. 6.3 Connectivity from Java to CICS TS
      4. 6.4 Security considerations
      5. 6.5 Other considerations
    14. Chapter 7. Mobile devices and CICS TS Java
      1. 7.1 Hosting transformation services in CICS TS Java
      2. 7.2 Characteristics of CICS data transformation
      3. 7.3 The Java-based pipeline
      4. 7.4 Security considerations
      5. 7.5 Other considerations
    15. Part 4 IBM Operational Decision Manager
    16. Chapter 8. Decision management integrated in IBM CICS Transaction Server
      1. 8.1 Introduction to decision management
        1. 8.1.1 Common business decisions that require managing
        2. 8.1.2 Where most decisions are made today
      2. 8.2 IBM Operational Decision Manager for z/OS
        1. 8.2.1 Operational Decision Manager components
        2. 8.2.2 Create decisions using the Rule Designer
        3. 8.2.3 Centrally manage decisions by using the Decision Center
        4. 8.2.4 Execute decisions by using the Decision Server
      3. 8.3 CICS TS rule-owning region architecture
        1. 8.3.1 Cost effectiveness
      4. 8.4 Decision management summary
    17. Chapter 9. Implementing decision management in CICS TS
      1. 9.1 Objectives
        1. 9.1.1 Solution requirements
      2. 9.2 Architecture
      3. 9.3 Implementation
        1. 9.3.1 Rule application development
        2. 9.3.2 Runtime configuration
        3. 9.3.3 Deployment and integration
      4. 9.4 Solution summary
    18. Part 5 Modern Batch feature
    19. Chapter 10. Modern batch workloads
      1. 10.1 Business pressures on traditional batch processing
        1. 10.1.1 The “dedicated batch” window is disappearing
        2. 10.1.2 The value of shared services
        3. 10.1.3 Java for batch processing
        4. 10.1.4 Conflicting needs of CICS applications and z/OS batch applications
      2. 10.2 WebSphere Java batch and batch container services
        1. 10.2.1 Definition of a batch environment
        2. 10.2.2 CICS functions
        3. 10.2.3 WebSphere Java batch
        4. 10.2.4 Job control language
        5. 10.2.5 Integration with enterprise schedulers
        6. 10.2.6 Checkpoint and job restart services
        7. 10.2.7 Data record read and write support services
        8. 10.2.8 Job resiliency services
      3. 10.3 Introduction to CICS batch support
        1. 10.3.1 CICS support for modern batch
      4. 10.4 Running batch applications in CICS
        1. 10.4.1 WebSphere batch environment architecture
      5. 10.5 Reasons to run a batch application in CICS
      6. 10.6 Benefits of running batch jobs within CICS
      7. 10.7 Implications of running batches in CICS
      8. 10.8 Summary
    20. Chapter 11. Modern batch use scenario
      1. 11.1 Java batch approaches
      2. 11.2 Architecture
        1. 11.2.1 Workflow
        2. 11.2.2 High availability consideration
        3. 11.2.3 Security consideration
      3. 11.3 Implementation
        1. 11.3.1 Install and configure CICS TS TS Feature Pack for Modern Batch
        2. 11.3.2 Developing a batch application
        3. 11.3.3 Deploying the batch application in CICS
        4. 11.3.4 Submit the xJCL to run the batch job
    21. Related publications
      1. IBM Redbooks
      2. Online resources
      3. Help from IBM
    22. Back cover
    23. IBM System x Reference Architecture for Hadoop: IBM InfoSphere BigInsights Reference Architecture
      1. Introduction
      2. Business problem and business value
      3. Reference architecture use
      4. Requirements
      5. InfoSphere BigInsights predefined configuration
      6. InfoSphere BigInsights HBase predefined configuration
      7. Deployment considerations
      8. Customizing the predefined configurations
      9. Predefined configuration bill of materials
      10. References
      11. The team who wrote this paper
      12. Now you can become a published author, too!
      13. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
    24. Notices
      1. Trademarks