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A Companion to Digital Art

Book Description

Reflecting the dynamic creativity of its subject, this definitive guide spans the evolution, aesthetics, and practice of today’s digital art, combining fresh, emerging perspectives with the nuanced insights of leading theorists.

  • Showcases the critical and theoretical approaches in this fast-moving discipline
  • Explores the history and evolution of digital art; its aesthetics and politics; as well as its often turbulent relationships with established institutions
  • Provides a platform for the most influential voices shaping the current discourse surrounding digital art, combining fresh, emerging perspectives with the nuanced insights of leading theorists
  • Tackles digital art’s primary practical challenges – how to present, document, and preserve pieces that could be erased forever by rapidly accelerating technological obsolescence
  • Up-to-date, forward-looking, and critically reflective, this authoritative new collection is informed throughout by a deep appreciation of the technical intricacies of digital art

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. List of Figures
  4. Notes on Contributors
  5. Acknowledgments
  6. Introduction
    1. Histories of Digital Art
    2. Aesthetics of Digital Art
    3. Network Cultures: The Politics of Digital Art
    4. Digital Art and the Institution
    5. References
  7. Part I: Histories of Digital Art
    1. 1 The Complex and Multifarious Expressions of Digital Art and Its Impact on Archives and Humanities
      1. Introduction
      2. Media Art’s Revolution?
      3. Media Art’s Multifarious Potential for Complex Expression
      4. Media Art and the Humanities
      5. Image Science: From the Image Atlas to the Virtual Museum
      6. Art History—Visual Studies—Image Science
      7. Complex Imagery
      8. Collective Strategies: New Tools for the Humanities
      9. The Archive of Digital Art (formerly Database of Virtual Art)
      10. Bridging the Gap: New Developments in Thesaurus Research
      11. Media Art Education
      12. The Problem of Media Art Documentation Today—Future Needs
      13. A New Structure for Media Art Research
      14. References
      15. Further Reading
    2. 2 International Networks of Early Digital Arts
      1. The IT Sector as Capitalist Dream of Growth
      2. The Emergence of Digital Arts and Related Networks
      3. Bridging Analog and Digital Art in New Tendencies
      4. Digital Art Networks of the 1980s
      5. Is It Possible to Organize a Meta-Network?
      6. Conclusion
      7. References
      8. Further Reading
    3. 3 Art in the Rear-View Mirror
      1. Artists and Media Archaeology—Before the Beginnings
      2. Art, Technology, and the Past in the 1950s and 1960s
      3. Avant-Garde Cinema, New Film Historicism, and Archaeologies of Projection
      4. New Media Art, Media Archaeology, and Female Media Artists
      5. Alternative Archaeologies of Moving Images and Sounds: Toshio Iwai and Paul DeMarinis
      6. Conclusion: The Media-Archaeological Turn
      7. References
      8. Further Reading
    4. 4 Proto-Media Art
      1. An Overview of Postwar Avant-garde Art
      2. Collectives, Exhibitions, and Organizations
      3. East Asian Avant-garde Art after World War II
      4. From Experimental Art to Digital Media Art
      5. References
    5. 5 Generative Art Theory
      1. Introduction
      2. What Is Generative Art?
      3. Complexity, Systems, and Generative Art
      4. The Future of Generative Art
      5. References
    6. 6 Digital Art at the Interface of Technology and Feminism
      1. Exclusions and Exceptions
      2. Inclusions
      3. Cyberfeminist Critique
      4. Networking Communities
      5. Hacktivist Pedagogy
      6. Representation, Change, and Fabriculture
      7. References
      8. Further Reading
    7. 7 The Hauntology of the Digital Image
      1. References
    8. 8 Participatory Art
      1. A First Thesis
      2. A Second Thesis
      3. A Third Thesis
      4. Four Case Studies of Dynamic Displays
      5. Conclusion: Toward an Art of Participation
      6. References
  8. Part II: Aesthetics of Digital Art
    1. 9 Small Abstract Aesthetics
      1. Aesthetics
      2. Aesthetic Condition
      3. Aesthetic Carriers
      4. Material Aesthetics
      5. Aesthetic Repertory
      6. The First Definition of an Aesthetic Condition
      7. Processes
      8. Aesthetic Distribution
      9. Aesthetic Information
      10. Reality Themes
      11. Creative and Communication Pattern
      12. Common Signs
      13. Signal and Sign
      14. Categories of Signs
      15. Semioses
      16. Numeric and Semiotic Aesthetics
      17. Micro- and Macroaesthetics
      18. General Numerical Aesthetics
      19. Numerical Macroaesthetics
      20. Numerical Microaesthetics
      21. Semiotic Macroaesthetics
      22. Semiotic Microaesthetics
      23. Nuclear Aesthetics
      24. Numerical Nuclear Aesthetics
      25. Semiotic Nuclear Aesthetics
      26. The System of Semiotic Aesthetic
      27. Crude and Subtle Aesthetics
      28. General Conclusion
      29. Acknowledgment
    2. 10 Aesthetics of the Digital
      1. References
    3. 11 Computational Aesthetics
      1. Medium Specificity
      2. Computational Construction
      3. Ten Aspects of Computational Aesthetics
      4. If – then
      5. References
    4. 12 Participatory Platforms and the Emergence of Art
      1. Archives, Art Platforms, and Web Communities
      2. Total Creativity and Social Media
      3. References
    5. 13 Interactive Art
      1. Introduction: Bodies in Process
      2. Bodies and Spaces
      3. Interaction and Relation
      4. Bodies and Signs
      5. Processing Interventions
      6. Bodies and Communities
      7. Strategies of Engagement
      8. Interactive Futures
      9. References
      10. Further Reading
    6. 14 The Cultural Work of Public Interactives
      1. Defining Public Interactives
      2. Importance of History
      3. The Cultural Impact of Public Interactives
      4. The Art and Design of Public Interactives
      5. Genres of Public Interactives
      6. Conclusion: Augmented Public Spaces, Experience Design, and the Technological Literacies of the Future
      7. References
      8. Further Reading
  9. Part III: Network Cultures: The Politics of Digital Art
    1. 15 Shockwaves in the New World Order of Information and Communication
      1. Introduction
      2. The Need for a New Political Economy of Communications
      3. “The Last Free Media of the West”
      4. The New New World Order
      5. Tactical Media
      6. Neoliberalism and Its Discontents
      7. Art of the Digital Commons
      8. Conclusion
      9. Acknowledgments
      10. References
    2. 16 Critical Intelligence in Art and Digital Media
      1. Digital Communication
      2. Interactive Media
      3. Intangible Materials
      4. Asymmetric Invisibility
      5. The Creative Empire
      6. Cultural Economies
      7. Imagineering Work
      8. A New Spirit of Art
      9. Smoke and Mirrors
      10. Phantoms in the City
      11. Operative Interventions
      12. From Tactics to Strategy
      13. Forgotten Futures
      14. Cultural Intelligence
      15. Fiction and Agency
      16. References
    3. 17 The Silver Age of Social Media
      1. References
    4. 18 Art in the Corporatized Sphere
      1. From Open Fields to Walled Gardens
      2. The Aesthetic Mechanics of Social Networks
      3. Trading Independence for Audience
      4. Appropriating the Platform
      5. Asserting Authorship
      6. What Defines Ownership Online?
      7. The Persistence of the Poor Image
      8. Building Critical Economies
      9. Acknowledgment
      10. References
      11. Further Reading
    5. 19 Artistic Visualization
      1. Defining Data Visualization
      2. Reduction and Space
      3. Visualization without Reduction
      4. Media Visualization: Examples
      5. Conclusion
      6. References
    6. 20 Critical Play
      1. Thinking “Critical Play”
      2. A Concise History of “Critical Play”
      3. Proposition 1: Critical Play Exposes and Examines Dominant Values
      4. Proposition 2: Critical Play Can Mean Toying with the Notion of Goals, Making Games with Problematic, Impossible, or Unusual Endings
      5. Proposition 3: Criticality Can Lead to Extreme New Kinds of Play, and Make Familiar Types of Play Unfamiliar
      6. The Future of Critical Play
      7. References
      8. Further Reading
  10. Part IV: Digital Art and the Institution
    1. 21 Contemporary Art and New Media
      1. Artworlds
      2. Bridging the Gap: Implicit vs. Explicit Influence and Medium Injustice
      3. The Post-Medium Condition and Its Discontents
      4. Further Provocations
      5. The $34.2 Million Question
      6. Acknowledgments
      7. References
    2. 22 One of Us!
      1. References
    3. 23 The Digital Arts In and Out of the Institution—Where to Now?
      1. What?
      2. Who?
      3. When?
      4. Where?
      5. How?
      6. Why?
      7. References
    4. 24 The Nuts and Bolts of Handling Digital Art
      1. Introduction
      2. Fundamental Concepts
      3. Learning the Work—Initial Conservation Assessment and Interview
      4. Collection and Capture
      5. When a Disk Image is Overkill
      6. Post-Capture Preparation for Long-term Storage
      7. Beyond the File System: Digital Repositories
      8. Intervention and Exhibition: Fundamental Treatment Concepts
      9. Intervention and Exhibition: The Magnavox Odyssey
      10. Documentation Practices
      11. Conclusion
      12. References
    5. 25 Trusting Amateurs with Our Future
      1. The Oldest Human Record
      2. What Are Professional Archivists to Make of This?
      3. The Amateurs Arrive
      4. The Amateurs Take Control
      5. Outperforming the Professionals: Emulation
      6. Learning from the Amateurs: Crowdsourcing
      7. Challenges of Proliferative Preservation
      8. Conclusion
      9. References
    6. 26 Enabling the Future, or How to Survive FOREVER
      1. Conservation Practice
      2. Authentic Alliances
      3. Identifying Authentic Alliances and the Use of Documentation
      4. Acknowledgments
      5. References
      6. Further Reading
    7. 27 Exhibition Histories and Futures
      1. New Media Systems—Databases, Taxonomies, and Methods
      2. Behaviors—Live, Social, Participative
      3. Exhibitions for Behaviors
      4. Documenting Exhibitions … and Audiences?
      5. Futures—Connected Modes of Documenting, Curating, and Historicizing?
      6. References
  11. Index
  12. End User License Agreement