O'Reilly logo

97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know by Richard Monson-Haefel

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 36. Value Stewardship Over Showmanship

Barry Hawkins has played various roles in his 13 years in the software industry, from lone developer to team lead to Agile coach and mentor. Barry is one of the few native Atlantans, currently specializing in coaching and mentoring for Agile software development and domain-driven design.

Barry Hawkins
image with no caption

WHEN AN ARCHITECT ENTERS A PROJECT, there is an understandable desire to prove his or her worth. Being assigned the role of software architect typically indicates implicit trust on the part of the company in the architect's technical leadership, and it only follows that the architect would desire to make good on that expectation as soon as possible. Unfortunately, there are those who labor under the misapprehension that proving one's worth consists of showmanship—bedazzling if not baffling the team with one's technical brilliance.

Showmanship, the act of appealing to your audience, is important in marketing, but it's counterproductive to leading a software development project. Architects must win the respect of their team by providing solid leadership and by truly understanding the technical and business domain in which they are expected to operate.

Stewardship, taking responsibility and care of another's property, is the appropriate role of an architect. An architect must act in the best interests of his customer and not pander to the needs ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required