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97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know by Richard Monson-Haefel

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Chapter 34. "Software Architect" Has Only Lowercase a's; Deal with It

Barry Hawkins has played various roles in his 13 years in the software industry, from lone developer to team lead to Agile coach and mentor. Barry is one of the few native Atlantans, currently specializing in coaching and mentoring for Agile software development and domain-driven design.

Barry Hawkins
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A DISAPPOINTING TREND has been in bloom for some time now within software development: the attempt to professionalize the practice of software architecture as one on par with the classical school of Architecture. This seems to stem from some need to further legitimize one's accomplishment beyond acknowledgment among one's peers and employer. By comparison, Architecture itself was not professionalized until the late 19th century, at least a few millennia after the practice had been around. It would be no great stretch to say that some software architects seem a bit eager by comparison.

Software architecture is a craft, and it certainly takes practice and discipline to achieve success in the field. That said, software development is still a relatively nascent endeavor. We don't even know enough about this practice to adequately professionalize it. Despite its youth, software development's product has become a highly valued tool, and as such, the accomplished individuals (as well as those who wish to be seen as accomplished) ...

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