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3D Video: From Capture to Diffusion

Book Description

While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.

The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide the necessary elements for understanding the underlying computer-based science of these technologies. They consider applications and perspectives previously unexplored due to technological limitations.

This book guides the reader through the production process of 3D videos; from acquisition, through data treatment and representation, to 3D diffusion. Several types of camera systems are considered (multiscopic or multiview) which lead to different acquisition, modeling and storage-rendering solutions. The application of these systems is also discussed to illustrate varying performance benefits, making this book suitable for students, academics, and also those involved in the film industry.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Contents
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright
  5. Foreword
  6. Notations
  7. Acknowledgments
  8. Introduction
  9. PART 1. 3D ACQUISITION OF SCENES
    1. Chapter 1: Foundation
      1. 1.1 Introduction
      2. 1.2 A short history
      3. 1.3. Stereopsis and 3D physiological aspects
      4. 1.4. 3D computer vision
      5. 1.5. Conclusion
      6. 1.6. Bibliography
    2. Chapter 2: Digital Cameras: Definitions and Principles
      1. 2.1. Introduction
      2. 2.2. Capturing light: physical fundamentals
      3. 2.3. Digital camera
      4. 2.4. Cameras, human vision and color
      5. 2.5. Improving current performance
      6. 2.6. Conclusion
      7. 2.7. Bibliography
    3. Chapter 3: Multiview Acquisition Systems
      1. 3.1. Introduction: what is a multiview acquisition system?
      2. 3.2. Binocular systems
      3. 3.3. Lateral or directional multiview systems
      4. 3.4. Global or omnidirectional multiview systems
      5. 3.5. Conclusion
      6. 3.6. Bibliography
    4. Chapter 4: Shooting and Viewing Geometries in 3DTV
      1. 4.1. Introduction
      2. 4.2. The geometry of 3D viewing
      3. 4.3. The geometry of 3D shooting
      4. 4.4. Geometric impact of the 3D workflow
      5. 4.5. Specification methodology for multiscopic shooting
      6. 4.6. OpenGL implementation
      7. 4.7. Conclusion
      8. 4.8. Bibliography
    5. Chapter 5: Camera Calibration: Geometric and Colorimetric Correction
      1. 5.1. Introduction
      2. 5.2. Camera calibration
      3. 5.3. Radial distortion
      4. 5.4. Image rectification
      5. 5.5. Colorimetric considerations in cameras
      6. 5.6. Conclusion
      7. 5.7. Bibliography
  10. PART 2. DESCRIPTION/RECONSTRUCTION OF 3D SCENES
    1. Chapter 6: Feature Points Detection and Image Matching
      1. 6.1. Introduction
      2. 6.2. Feature points
      3. 6.3. Feature point descriptors
      4. 6.4. Image matching
      5. 6.5. Conclusion
      6. 6.6. Bibliography
    2. Chapter 7: Multi- and Stereoscopic Matching,Depth and Disparity
      1. 7.1. Introduction
      2. 7.2. Difficulties, primitives and stereoscopic matching
      3. 7.3. Simplified geometry and disparity
      4. 7.4. A description of stereoscopic and multiscopic methods
      5. 7.5. Methods for explicitly accounting for occlusions
      6. 7.6. Conclusion
      7. 7.7. Bibliography
    3. Chapter 8: 3D Scene Reconstruction and Structuring
      1. 8.1. Problems and challenges
      2. 8.2. Silhouette-based reconstruction
      3. 8.3. Industrial application
      4. 8.4. Temporally structuring reconstructions
      5. 8.5. Conclusion
      6. 8.6. Bibliography
    4. Chapter 9: Synthesizing Intermediary Viewpoints
      1. 9.1. Introduction
      2. 9.2. Viewpoint synthesis by interpolation and extrapolation
      3. 9.3. Inpainting uncovered zones
      4. 9.4. Conclusion
      5. 9.5. Bibliography
  11. PART 3. STANDARDS AND COMPRESSION OF 3D VIDEO
    1. Chapter 10: Multiview Video Coding (MVC)
      1. 10.1. Introduction
      2. 10.2. Specific approaches to stereoscopy
      3. 10.3. Multiview approaches
      4. 10.4. Conclusion
      5. 10.5. Bibliography
    2. Chapter 11: 3D Mesh Compression
      1. 11.1. Introduction
      2. 11.2. Compression basics: rate-distortion trade-off
      3. 11.3. Multiresolution coding of surface meshes
      4. 11.4. Topological and progressive coding
      5. 11.5. Mesh sequence compression
      6. 11.6. Quality evaluation: classic and perceptual metrics
      7. 11.7. Conclusion
      8. 11.8. Bibliography
    3. Chapter 12: Coding Methods for Depth Videos
      1. 12.1. Introduction
      2. 12.2. Analyzing the characteristics of a depth map
      3. 12.3. Depth coding methods
      4. 12.4. Conclusion
      5. 12.5. Bibliography
    4. Chapter 13: StereoscopicWatermarking
      1. 13.1. Introduction
      2. 13.2. Constraints of stereoscopic video watermarking
      3. 13.3. State of the art for stereoscopic content watermarking
      4. 13.4. Comparative study
      5. 13.5. Conclusions
      6. 13.6. Bibliography
  12. PART 4. RENDERING AND 3D DISPLAY
    1. Chapter 14: HD 3DTV and Autostereoscopy
      1. 14.1. Introduction
      2. 14.2. Technological principles
      3. 14.3. Design of mixing filters
      4. 14.4. View generation and interleaving
      5. 14.5. Future developments
      6. 14.6. Conclusion
      7. 14.7. Bibliography
    2. Chapter 15: Augmented and/or Mixed Reality
      1. 15.1. Introduction
      2. 15.2. Real-time pose computation
      3. 15.3. Model acquisition
      4. 15.4. Conclusion
      5. 15.5. Bibliography
    3. Chapter 16: Visual Comfort and Fatigue in Stereoscopy
      1. 16.1. Introduction
      2. 16.2. Visual comfort and fatigue: definitions and indications
      3. 16.3. Signs and symptoms of fatigue and discomfort
      4. 16.4. Sources of visual fatigue and discomfort
      5. 16.5. Application to 3D content and technologies
      6. 16.6. Predicting visual fatigue and discomfort: first models
      7. 16.7. Conclusion
      8. 16.8. Bibliography
    4. Chapter 17: 2D–3D Conversion
      1. 17.1. Introduction
      2. 17.2. The 2D–3D conversion workflow
      3. 17.3. Preparing content for conversion
      4. 17.4. Conversion stages
      5. 17.5. 3D–3D conversion
      6. 17.6. Conclusion
      7. 17.7. Bibliography
  13. PART 5. IMPLEMENTATION AND OUTLETS
    1. Chapter 18: 3D Model Retrieval
      1. 18.1. Introduction
      2. 18.2. General principles of shape retrieval
      3. 18.3. Global 3D shape descriptors
      4. 18.4. 2D view oriented methods
      5. 18.5. Local 3D shape descriptors
      6. 18.6. Similarity between 3D shapes
      7. 18.7. Shape recognition in 3D video
      8. 18.8. Evaluation of the performance of indexing methods
      9. 18.9. Applications
      10. 18.10. Conclusion
      11. 18.11. Bibliography
    2. Chapter 19: 3D HDR Images and Videos: Acquisition and Restitution
      1. 19.1. Introduction
      2. 19.2. HDR and 3D acquisition
      3. 19.3. 3D HDR restitution
      4. 19.4. Conclusion
      5. 19.5. Bibliography
    3. Chapter 20: 3D Visualization for Life Sciences
      1. 20.1. Introduction
      2. 20.2. Scientific visualization
      3. 20.3. Medical imaging
      4. 20.4. Molecular modeling
      5. 20.5. Conclusion
      6. 20.6. Bibliography
    4. Chapter 21: 3D Reconstruction of Sport Scenes
      1. 21.1. Introduction
      2. 21.2. Automatic selection of a region of interest (ROI)
      3. 21.3. The Hough transform
      4. 21.4. Matching image features to the geometric model
      5. 21.5. Conclusion
      6. 21.6. Bibliography
    5. Chapter 22: Experiments in Live Capture and Transmission of Stereoscopic 3D Video Images
      1. 22.1. Introduction
      2. 22.2. Retransmissions of various shows
      3. 22.3. Retransmissions of surgical operations
      4. 22.4. Retransmissions of "steadicam" interviews
      5. 22.5. Retransmission of a transatlantic video presentation
      6. 22.6. Retransmissions of bicycle races
      7. 22.7. Conclusion
      8. 22.8. Bibliography
  14. Conclusion
  15. List of Authors
  16. Index