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3D Programming for Windows® by Charles Petzold

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Defining "Solid" Figures

Let's ascend the MeshGeometry3D complexity ladder again and try constructing a solid figure, which is simply a matter of defining triangles that aren't in the same plane. A cube, for example, is simply six squares, each of which consists of two triangles, and it only looks like a cube because the corners and sides of the six squares meet. I put the word "solid" in quotation marks in the heading to this section because these figures only appear to be solid. A cube is defined as a collection of six squares, and the cube is actually hollow inside.

Rather than a cube, I want to construct a square cuboid such as the ones I showed toward the beginning of this chapter. Like the cube, the square cuboid consist of six sides, which ...

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