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21st Century C

Cover of 21st Century C by Ben Klemens Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. 21st Century C
  2. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
  3. A Note Regarding Supplemental Files
  4. Preface
    1. C Is Punk Rock
    2. Q & A (Or, the Parameters of the Book)
    3. Standards: So Many to Choose From
      1. The POSIX Standard
    4. Some Logistics
      1. Conventions Used in This Book
      2. Using Code Examples
      3. Safari® Books Online
      4. How to Contact Us
      5. Acknowledgments
  5. I. The Environment
    1. 1. Set Yourself Up for Easy Compilation
      1. Use a Package Manager
      2. Compiling C with Windows
      3. Which Way to the Library?
      4. Using Makefiles
      5. Using Libraries from Source
      6. Using Libraries from Source (Even if Your Sysadmin Doesn’t Want You To)
      7. Compiling C Programs via Here Document
    2. 2. Debug, Test, Document
      1. Using a Debugger
      2. Using Valgrind to Check for Errors
      3. Unit Testing
      4. Interweaving Documentation
      5. Error Checking
    3. 3. Packaging Your Project
      1. The Shell
      2. Makefiles vs. Shell Scripts
      3. Packaging Your Code with Autotools
    4. 4. Version Control
      1. Changes via diff
      2. Git’s Objects
      3. Trees and Their Branches
      4. Remote Repositories
    5. 5. Playing Nice with Others
      1. The Process
      2. Python Host
  6. II. The Language
    1. 6. Your Pal the Pointer
      1. Automatic, Static, and Manual Memory
      2. Persistent State Variables
      3. Pointers Without malloc
    2. 7. C Syntax You Can Ignore
      1. Don’t Bother Explicitly Returning from main
      2. Let Declarations Flow
      3. Cast Less
      4. Enums and Strings
      5. Labels, gotos, switches, and breaks
      6. Deprecate Float
    3. 8. Obstacles and Opportunity
      1. Cultivate Robust and Flourishing Macros
      2. Linkage with static and extern
      3. The const Keyword
    4. 9. Text
      1. Making String Handling Less Painful with asprintf
      2. A Pæan to strtok
      3. Unicode
    5. 10. Better Structures
      1. Compound Literals
      2. Variadic Macros
      3. Safely Terminated Lists
      4. Foreach
      5. Vectorize a Function
      6. Designated Initializers
      7. Initialize Arrays and Structs with Zeros
      8. Typedefs Save the Day
      9. Return Multiple Items from a Function
      10. Flexible Function Inputs
      11. The Void Pointer and the Structures It Points To
    6. 11. Object-Oriented Programming in C
      1. What You Don’t Get (and Why You Won’t Miss It)
      2. Extending Structures and Dictionaries
      3. Functions in Your Structs
      4. Count References
    7. 12. Libraries
      1. GLib
      2. POSIX
      3. The GNU Scientific Library
      4. SQLite
      5. libxml and cURL
  7. Epilogue
  8. Glossary
  9. Bibliography
  10. Index
  11. About the Author
  12. Colophon
  13. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
  14. Copyright
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Chapter 12. Libraries

And if I really wanted to learn something I’d listen to more records. And I do, we do, you do.

The Hives, “Untutored Youth”

This chapter will cover a few libraries that will make your life easier.

My impression is that C libraries have grown less pedantic over the years. Ten years ago, the typical library provided the minimal set of tools necessary for work, and expected you to build convenient and programmer-friendly versions from those basics. The typical library would require you to perform all memory allocation, because it’s not the place of a library to grab memory without asking. Conversely, the functions presented in this chapter all make use of the an “easy” interface, like curl_easy_... functions for cURL, Sqlite’s single function to execute all the gory steps of a database transaction, or the three lines of code we need to set up a mutex via GLib. If they need intermediate workspaces to get the work done, they just do it. They are fun to use.

I’ll start with somewhat standard and very general libraries, and move on to a few of my favorite libraries for more specific purposes, including SQLite, the GNU Scientific Library, libxml2, and libcURL. I can’t guess what you are using C for, but these are friendly, reliable systems for doing broadly applicable tasks.

GLib

Given that the standard library left so much to be filled in, it is only natural that a library would eventually evolve to fill in the gaps. GLib implements enough basic computing needs that it ...

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