Posted on by & filed under Business, communication, Content - Highlights and Reviews, innovation, leadership, leading teams, managing people, managing yourself, Personal Development, work culture.

Safari has just loaded in a terrific collection of short articles from new publishing partner Harvard Business School Working Knowledge. Working Knowledge is an online-only periodical that gives a practical focus to new research and ideas from Harvard Business School faculty.

We’ve curated a special collection of Working Knowledge content specifically for Safari’s audience. Check out the full collection, which spans all the major management topics. And here are a handful of recommendations to get you started:

Horrible Boss Workarounds: Bad bosses are generally more inept than evil, and often aren’t purposefully bad, says Professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter. She discusses common bad-boss behaviors, and how good colleagues can mobilize to overcome the roadblocks.

It’s Not Nagging: Why Persistent, Redundant Communication Works: Managers who inundate their teams with the same messages, over and over, via multiple media, need not feel bad about their persistence. In fact, this redundant communication works to get projects completed quickly.

Five Ways to Make Your Company More Innovative: How do you create a company that unleashes and capitalizes on innovation? HBS faculty experts in culture, customers, creativity, marketing, and the DNA of innovators offer up ideas.

Being the Boss: Striking the right balance between good management and good leadership is a daunting but necessary challenge for anyone endeavoring to be a good boss. Harvard Business School professor Linda A. Hill and former executive Kent Lineback discuss the steps to take and the roadblocks to avoid in order to meet that challenge.

Are Creative People More Dishonest?: In a series of studies, Francesca Gino and Dan Ariely found that inherently creative people tend to cheat more than noncreative people. Furthermore, they showed that inducing creative behavior tends to induce unethical behavior. It’s a sobering thought in a corporate culture that champions out-of-the-box thinking.

 

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