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  • Melissa Thornton thinks this is interesting:

On the other hand, in a newly formed start-up with a new team, a poor understanding of the subject matter, and a new challenge that requires bleeding-edge technology, it is fairly certain that a lot can and will go wrong. This must be planned for. A good textbook answer for buffering in such a situation would be 200% [Goldratt 1997, p. 46]. In reality, it is only possible to get away with such a buffer, if there is no process maturity and no one making public guesses as to how long the project should take. In many cases, a development manager will find it impossible to gain agreement on 200%. In which case, I would suggest a fallback position of no less than 100%. Tab...