Cover image for XML Pocket Reference

Book description

XML, the Extensible Markup Language, is the next-generation markup language for the Web. It provides a more structured (and therefore more powerful) medium than HTML, allowing us to define new document types and stylesheets as needed. Although the generic tags of HTML are sufficient for everyday text, XML gives us a way to add rich, well-defined markup to electronic documents. The XML Pocket Reference is both a handy introduction to XML terminology and syntax, and a quick reference to XML instructions, attributes, entities, and datatypes. It also covers XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language), necessary to ensure that your XML documents have a consistent look and feel across platforms. Although XML itself is complex, its basic concepts are simple. This small book acts both as a perfect tutorial for learning the basics of XML, and as a reference to the XML and XSL specifications.

Table of Contents

  1. XML Pocket Reference
    1. 1. XML Pocket Reference
      1. XML Terminology
        1. Unlearning Bad Habits
        2. An Overview of an XML Document
        3. A Simple XML Document
          1. Namespaces
        4. A Simple Document Type Definition (DTD)
        5. A Simple XSL Stylesheet
      2. XML Reference
        1. Well-Formed XML
        2. XML Instructions
          1. <?xml ... ?>
          2. <!DOCTYPE>
          3. <?...?>
          4. CDATA
          5. -1
        3. Element and Attribute Rules
        4. XML Reserved Attributes
          1. xml:lang
          2. xml:space
          3. xml:link
          4. xml:attribute
        5. Entity References
      3. Document Type Definitions
        1. Element Declarations
          1. ANY and PCDATA
          2. Multiple elements
          3. Grouping and recurrence
          4. Empty elements
        2. Entities
          1. General entities
          2. Parameter entities
          3. External entities
          4. Unparsed entities
          5. Notations
        3. Attribute Declarations in the DTD
          1. Default values
          2. Datatypes
        4. Included and Ignored Marked Sections
        5. Internal Subsets
      4. The Extensible Stylesheet Language
        1. Formatting Objects
        2. General Formatting
        3. Pattern Matching
          1. Matching on ancestry
          2. Tests
          3. Other matchings
          4. Attribute value templates
          5. Numbering elements
          6. Template matching rules
          7. Linking in stylesheets
        4. XSL Elements
          1. <xsl:apply-imports>
          2. <xsl:apply-templates>
          3. <xsl:arg>
          4. <xsl:attribute>
          5. <xsl:attribute-set>
          6. <xsl:choose>
          7. <xsl:comment>
          8. <xsl:constant>
          9. <xsl:contents>
          10. <xsl:copy>
          11. <xsl:counter>
          12. <xsl:counters>
          13. <xsl:counter-increment>
          14. <xsl:counter-reset>
          15. <xsl:counter-scope>
          16. <xsl:element>
          17. <xsl:for-each>
          18. <xsl:id>
          19. <xsl:if>
          20. <xsl:import>
          21. <xsl:include>
          22. <xsl:macro>
          23. <xsl:macro-arg>
          24. <xsl:number>
          25. <xsl:otherwise>
          26. <xsl:pi>
          27. <xsl:preserve-space>
          28. <xsl:strip-space>
          29. <xsl:value-of>
          30. <xsl:template>
          31. <xsl:text>
          32. <xsl:use>
          33. <xsl:when>
      5. XLink and XPointer
        1. Unique Identifiers
        2. ID References
        3. XPointers
          1. ID references with XPointer
          2. Absolute location terms
          3. Relative location terms
          4. Arguments
          5. Terms
          6. Strings
          7. Spans
          8. Arcana
          9. Additional node types
          10. Locating attributes
          11. When XPointers fail
        4. XLink
          1. Attribute remapping
        5. Building Extended Links
          1. Inline multiended links
          2. Out-of-line links
    2. Index