Cover image for Mastering HD Video with Your DSLR

Book description

Many of the newest DSLRs include HD video capability, and while the interest from the photography community was initially cool, we have seen a recent shift. Photographers are beginning to explore the video capabilities of their cameras and want to learn about the art and craft of creating high quality video.

This book takes photographers through video concepts, video features of their DSLRs, equipment needed to shoot video, to understanding the restrictions, problems, and pitfalls of shooting video with a DSLR. Learn how to capture and edit video footage, to achieve the unique "motion picture look" and effects not possible with standard digital video equipment. Examples, video clips, and other useful materials are on the DVD included with the book.

Photographers who are ready to give HD video a serious try, as well as videographers interested in exploring the possibilities of DSLRs for their work will find this book an indispensable source of technical know-how and inspiration.

Table of Contents

  1. Mastering HD Video with Your DSLR
    1. Foreword
      1. Technology
      2. Aesthetics
      3. Presentation
    2. 1. Basics
      1. Video Formats and Resolution
      2. Frame Rates and Refresh Rates
        1. Cinema Projection
        2. Interlaced TV and Video Applications
        3. Full-frame or Progressive Scan Projection
        4. General Terminology
        5. DSLR Frame Rates
        6. Playback Frame Rates
      3. Data Formats and Data Compression
        1. Video Codecs
        2. Container Formats
      4. Storage Media
        1. SD Cards
        2. CompactFlash Cards
      5. Image Sensor Size
        1. Common DSLR Sensor Types
        2. Comparing DSLR Sensors with Common Video Formats and Video Camera Sensors
        3. The Effects of Sensor Size on Exposure
        4. The Effects of Sensor Size on Depth of Field
      6. Types of Sensor
        1. Rolling Shutter Effect
        2. Blooming
        3. Optimum Use of Image Sensors
    3. 2. Equipment
      1. Types of Camera
        1. Compact Cameras
        2. Bridge Cameras
        3. Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) Cameras
      2. Lenses
        1. Wide-angle Lenses
        2. Standard Lenses
        3. Telephoto Lenses
        4. Zooms and Superzooms
        5. Ultra-bright Lenses
        6. Macro Lenses
        7. Fisheye Lenses
        8. Tilt/Shift Lenses
        9. Exotic Lenses
      3. Using Video Lights and Reflectors
      4. Tripods
      5. Using Microphones
      6. Other Useful Gadgets
        1. Spirit Level
        2. Lens Cloth
        3. Blower Brush
        4. Grayscale and Color Control Cards
        5. Light Meters
        6. Clapperboard
        7. GPS receiver
      7. Dedicated Video Accessories for DSLRs
        1. Lens Hoods and Matte Boxes
        2. Filters
        3. Follow Focus
        4. Fluid Zoom Drive
        5. External Monitor
    4. 3. Shooting Techniques
      1. From Concept to Finished Film
      2. Choosing Your Location
      3. Selecting Focal Length
        1. Differences between Photo and Video Formats
        2. Framing Using Formulas
        3. Focal Length and Image Field
        4. Focal Length and Perspective
      4. Aperture and Depth of Field
      5. Distance Settings
        1. Hyperfocus
      6. Exposure and White Balance
        1. Consistent Lighting
        2. Consistent Color Temperature
      7. Shutter Speeds
      8. Tripod or Handheld?
      9. Time-lapse Sequences
      10. Stop Motion Sequences
      11. Slow Motion
      12. Video as an Extension of the Photographic Medium
        1. Panorama Views
        2. Reducing Distance
        3. Capturing Movement
      13. Avoiding Errors
        1. Lens Flare
        2. Rolling Shutter Effect
        3. Moiré Effect
        4. Blooming and Smears
        5. Specks and Spots
        6. Flicker Effects
        7. Noise
        8. Under- and Overexposure
        9. Focusing without Autofocus
        10. Focusing with Autofocus
        11. Automatic Camera Functions
        12. Distortion
        13. Camera Shake
      14. Ten Rules for Shooting Better Video
        1. Avoid Unnecessary Zooms
        2. Avoid Unnecessary Pans
        3. Avoid Unnecessary Changes in Focal Length
        4. Use an Appropriate Lens
        5. Use Depth of Field Creatively
        6. Know Your Sensor
        7. Stay in Control
        8. Avoid Using too much Fast Movement
        9. Always Shoot Using the Best Possible Image Quality
        10. Learn from Your Mistakes
      15. Legal Issues
        1. Filming People
        2. Filming Children
        3. Celebrities and Other Media Personalities
        4. Getting Permission to Shoot on Location
        5. Filming Products
    5. 4. Sound
      1. Microphones
        1. Built-in Microphones
        2. Accessory Microphones
      2. Microphone Technology
        1. Dynamic Microphones
        2. Condenser Microphones
        3. Electret Microphones
        4. Mono and Stereo Microphones
        5. Directionality
      3. Microphone Accessories
        1. Windshields
        2. Suspension Units
        3. Booms and poles
        4. Plugs and Adapters
        5. Headphones
      4. Avoiding Background Noise
        1. Hum
        2. Clicking
        3. Hiss
        4. Camera Noise
        5. Wind Noise
        6. Echo
        7. Whistle
        8. Unintentionally Swapped Stereo Channels
      5. Dedicated Microphone Accessories for DSLRs
      6. Four Basic Rules for Capturing Great Sound
        1. Leave Microphone Setup, Sound Recording, and Post-processing to Specialists
        2. Always Record Location Sound
        3. Always Record Sound at the Best Available Quality
        4. Avoid Background Noise Whenever Possible
      7. Dubbing Sound
    6. 5. Editing and Post-Processing
      1. Step 1: View and Evaluate
      2. Step 2: Optimize
      3. Step 3: Creating Your Sequence
      4. Step 4: Transitions
      5. Step 5: Editing and Adding Sound
      6. Step 6: Finishing
      7. Mac OS and Windows
      8. Editing Software (iMovie & Co)
      9. Preparing Your Material
        1. Using Histograms to Correct Tonal Values
        2. Exposure
        3. Brightness
        4. Contrast
        5. Saturation
        6. Primary Color Correction
        7. White Point
        8. Correcting Shadows and Highlights
        9. Sharpening
        10. Image Noise
        11. Digital Steadycams
      10. Creating and Editing a Sequence
        1. Editing Basics
        2. Titles and End Credits
        3. Transitions
        4. Editing Effects
      11. Using Photos in a Video Sequence
        1. The Ken Burns Effect
        2. Three-dimensional (3D) Effects
      12. 10 Rules for Producing Great Edits
        1. Stick to Your Original Idea
        2. Don’t Forget the Opening Titles
        3. Experiment with Color and Monochrome
        4. Use Contrast Creatively
        5. Switch between Movement and Calm
        6. Preserve Continuity
        7. Use Transition Effects Carefullly
        8. Combine Still and Moving Images
        9. Pay Attention to Sound
        10. Use the End Credits to Give Praise Where it is Due
      13. Export Formats
    7. 6. Presenting Your Work
      1. Online Presentation
      2. Presenting Your Work on Your own Website
      3. Hardware
        1. Computer Monitors
        2. HDTV
        3. Mobile Devices (iPhones, iPods, notebooks and smartphones)
        4. Multimedia Projectors
      4. Sound
    8. 7. Moving from Still Photography to Video
      1. Entering the New World of Video
        1. Still and Video: A few similarities, many differences
      2. Telling Your Stories
      3. Working without a Script
      4. Editing
      5. Important Technical Issue to Consider
        1. Compression: your friend and enemy
        2. Picture Style Matters
        3. White Balance (WB)
        4. Resolution and Frame Rate
        5. Aperture and Shutter Speed
        6. What to do if the light is very bright
        7. What to do if the light is low
      6. Shooting Clips
        1. Lenses
        2. Zoom Effect
        3. Stabilization and Camera Movement
        4. Filters
        5. Focusing
        6. Shooting Footage
        7. Shooting for Common Special Effects
          1. Slow Motion
          2. Time Lapse
          3. Shooting Time Lapse
          4. Editing Time Lapse
          5. HDR Time Lapse
      7. Overall Workflow
        1. Script or equivalent
        2. Shooting Clips
        3. Copy your Clips to Your Computer
        4. Transcoding
        5. Viewing and Clip Rating
        6. Project Structure
        7. Pre-trimming of Clips
      8. Editing Basics
        1. HD NLE Editor (we use Final Cut Pro 7)
        2. Setting up Your Editor
          1. Scratch Disks for Video Caching
          2. Basic Project Settings (Your Defaults)
          3. Basic User Interface (UI) Elements
          4. Main Monitor
          5. Second Monitor
          6. Tools Palette
        3. New Project
          1. Import Assets into the Editor
          2. Timeline
          3. Play Head
          4. Adding One Clip at a Time
          5. Adding Multiple Clips at the Same Time
          6. Fine-tuning the Movie in the Timeline
          7. Transitions
          8. Generators
          9. Making Still Images Move
          10. The Motion Tab
          11. Corrections
          12. Stabilization Processes: Smoothcam, Motion, and Magic Bullet Steady
          13. Color/Contrast Corrections
          14. Sharpening
          15. Other Plug-ins (FCP FX Plug-ins)
          16. Overlays and Blending
          17. Titles, Text, and Credits
      9. Creating Your own Look
      10. Adding Sound
      11. Export Your Video
      12. Post-Processing and Adding Effects
        1. Working in Photoshop CS4 Extended with Videos
      13. Showing Your Videos
        1. Presenting Your own Movies
        2. Mac or PC
        3. Sharing over the Internet
          1. Export Your Movies for Internet Sharing
        4. Playing Your Movies on Your HD TV
      14. Conclusion
    9. A. Useful Links
    10. Index
    11. About the Authors